Massive security hole in CPU's incoming?Official Meltdown/Spectre Discussion Thread

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deasd

Senior member
Dec 31, 2013
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Just went over old Spectre/Meltdown mitigation test summary from last year, it seems context switching result heavily depends on memory latency, IO, and core-interconnect, since 10980XE has the same arch as 10900K but only different in some other factors that mentioned above... the only way that explain why Intel HEDT suffer the most.

In short, this is not a generic algorithm test and more of a stress program switching test between cores, we have to wait for Windows responding to new Spectre.

With the number of cores per CPU growing ever since, there is less and less need to even switch between programs. (There is still the user<->kernel transition on each syscall, depending on one's interpretation of "context switch". However, I seem to remember TSS change/TLB flush was the expensive part, so program switch it is.)

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deasd

Senior member
Dec 31, 2013
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So..... a month later, still no action from Microsoft against Spectre V2 ??? What's going on there,....
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
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So..... a month later, still no action from Microsoft against Spectre V2 ??? What's going on there,....
Nothing, apparently. I guess they think they can ignore it so long as there are no PoCs or active exploits in the wild.
 

igor_kavinski

Platinum Member
Jul 27, 2020
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Intel can't take the performance hit. They will wait till Raptor Lake possibly to slow down ADL with security patches.
 

beginner99

Diamond Member
Jun 2, 2009
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So..... a month later, still no action from Microsoft against Spectre V2 ??? What's going on there,....
The issue is overblown. Always has been for client (=us) users. It has always been an issue with cloud providers where different people share stuff on the same machine (CPU) and exploting these could give them unwanted access. But let's be clear. Nobody runs security ciritical stuff on shared machines so even then it's doubtful how useful that attack ever was outside of state-actors.
For linux it is fixed and these machines all run linux and not windows. The only place you find windows server is inside corporations and here the whole sharing one machine part is much less critical as only your admins could really exploit and they are your admins so they don^t need security bugs to do nefarious things. (These machines are behind firewalls so only internal users are possible attackers)
 
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