Job Offer acceptance etiquette

Mellman

Diamond Member
Jul 9, 2003
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Last week, I got a job offer, verbally accepted...and the paperwork was mailed to my house on saturday (actual letter, drug test form etc.)

Today (monday) I get 5 phone calls and a few emails with companies who want to interview me, and also a tentative offer from one...

I'm not really sure what to do here. I verbally accepted the offer from the first company, and that means nothing. I'd like to interview with these other companies to compare what their jobs will be like etc. Salaries will all be comparable, and all are on government contracts.

HELP! I have no clue how to handle all of this, I didn't expect to be under the gun like this!

-Matt
 

D1gger

Diamond Member
Oct 3, 2004
5,411
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Take your time and talk to at least a couple of the other companies. Make some excuse to buy yourself some time with company #1. You won't be happy with company #1 if you don't know what the competition will be offering. If you end up taking an offer from company #2 or #3, then #1 will be pissed, but they will quickly move on.
 

Mellman

Diamond Member
Jul 9, 2003
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yeah, the job at company # 1 is pretty good - but the benefits can't be beat. Their salary offer was topped by a little bit - but 4 weeks PTO right out of college at company 1 is pretty darn good... all the other companys i doubt can compete with THAT and on salary...
 

jaybert

Diamond Member
Mar 6, 2001
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Originally posted by: Mellman
yeah, the job at company # 1 is pretty good - but the benefits can't be beat. Their salary offer was topped by a little bit - but 4 weeks PTO right out of college at company 1 is pretty darn good... all the other companys i doubt can compete with THAT and on salary...

Sounds like you are pretty happy with the first job offer. Recruiters aren't stupid....they will see right through your excuses as to why you arent willing to sign a written offer letter. They recruit, so I'm sure they've heard all the excuses.

Question you need to ask yourself: Are you willing to lose this offer for the chance of getting another offer? Are the jobs who you want to interview for THAT great? Sure, the company that gave you the offer wants you to work for them, but even in today's stronger job market, there are plenty of people who would take the offer in a split-second, so surely you arent their only option (especially if the job is as good as you say it is).
 

jagec

Lifer
Apr 30, 2004
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Originally posted by: Mellman
yeah, the job at company # 1 is pretty good - but the benefits can't be beat. Their salary offer was topped by a little bit - but 4 weeks PTO right out of college at company 1 is pretty darn good... all the other companys i doubt can compete with THAT and on salary...

If they offer that much PTO, and the salary is pretty close, I'd jump on that right away. Then again, I'm more of a "quality-of-life" rather than "quantity-of-bank-account" sort of person.
 

Mellman

Diamond Member
Jul 9, 2003
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I'm definetly more quality of life rather than quantity of bank account...i just think well maybe one of the other jobs would be better suited for me.

I'm going to interview tomorrow with two companies, I love interviewing it is a great experience, and I figure I can always use the practice...

-Matt
 

UNCjigga

Lifer
Dec 12, 2000
24,832
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I have a related question--when you get an offer, what is the best way to negotiate salary? If I want to ask for more money, what is the best reasoning to give? Do I cite cost of living in that market and median range figures from salary.com, or is it better to offer a personal reason? I've never really done this before so I'm not very skilled at this art. Basically, if I ask for more money, I'm sure the other side will ask "why" and I'll have to provide a reason. What's a good % range for negotiation? 5%? 10%?
 

Triforceofcourage

Platinum Member
Feb 21, 2004
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Originally posted by: UNCjigga
I have a related question--when you get an offer, what is the best way to negotiate salary? If I want to ask for more money, what is the best reasoning to give? Do I cite cost of living in that market and median range figures from salary.com, or is it better to offer a personal reason? I've never really done this before so I'm not very skilled at this art. Basically, if I ask for more money, I'm sure the other side will ask "why" and I'll have to provide a reason. What's a good % range for negotiation? 5%? 10%?

market value FTW!!! Say the market currently pays more and ask if they can be more competitive
 

jaybert

Diamond Member
Mar 6, 2001
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Originally posted by: UNCjigga
I have a related question--when you get an offer, what is the best way to negotiate salary? If I want to ask for more money, what is the best reasoning to give? Do I cite cost of living in that market and median range figures from salary.com, or is it better to offer a personal reason? I've never really done this before so I'm not very skilled at this art. Basically, if I ask for more money, I'm sure the other side will ask "why" and I'll have to provide a reason. What's a good % range for negotiation? 5%? 10%?

do you have another offer? (even if its one you do not want). For me personally, I had 2 offers, one I really wanted, and 1 that I would have taken if I didnt get the other offer. The one I wanted actually paid more and allowed me to choose where I wanted to live (consulting), and the other was in AZ. What I did, was I plugged in the salary from AZ into a cost-of-living calculator, and found the equiv in NYC (where I had planned on living). I was upfront with them, I told them I really wanted the job, but I had another offer and wanted to see if they would be willing to match the cost-of-living equiv. I made it clear that even if they didnt match it, I was still interested in the position, just that my decision deciding between the two would be more difficult.

I think this is the best way if this is the job you really want, and you would take even if they did not offer you more money. Now, if you were willing to not take the job if they do not match your asking price, then you have more leverage.

 

RaistlinZ

Diamond Member
Oct 15, 2001
7,629
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Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: UNCjigga
I have a related question--when you get an offer, what is the best way to negotiate salary? If I want to ask for more money, what is the best reasoning to give? Do I cite cost of living in that market and median range figures from salary.com, or is it better to offer a personal reason? I've never really done this before so I'm not very skilled at this art. Basically, if I ask for more money, I'm sure the other side will ask "why" and I'll have to provide a reason. What's a good % range for negotiation? 5%? 10%?

market value FTW!!! Say the market currently pays more and ask if they can be more competitive

Um.. you can't just go in saying the market currently pays more if you haven't done your homework first, or else you'll look like a complete idiot and they may not hire you at all just for jerking them around.

Find out if what they're offering is comparable to what other corporations in the industry give to new hires with your talents and experience.
 

Eos

Diamond Member
Jun 14, 2000
3,473
16
81
In December of 2004, my girlfriend was interviewing for her first job out of her Master's program at Vanderbilt. The company was good, salary was good (plus $25,000 a year for loan repayment), but they never called back. She interviewed again in February, didn't like the position at all. Low salary (loan repayment again), on call every other weekend, feh.

After that one, she called the first one and asked for an update. They said they would call back in a week or so, but they were very impresseed with here. A few of the hiring team were out of the office and some more discussion had to take place. The second job made an offer within a week and she put it off for 10 days until the first interview made an offer. She took the first and told the second to get lost.

That was a rough 10 days.
 

Mellman

Diamond Member
Jul 9, 2003
3,083
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76
yeah currently i have several offers floating around...but the first offer has the best overall package...and the shortest commute, which in NOVA is a huge benefit.

to the person who asked how to negotiate salary...if you have no other offers, you can't really negotiate much. But you can see what other companies salary ranges are. Really most places try to be competitive, but if you feel they arent being competitive get out there and get more offers! or at least tell them you are interviewing a few other places.

The biggest thing for me, company #1 interviewed me, said they loved me, and would get back to me in about 2 weeks....Ok 2 weeks? thats a long time, so i goto a job fair the next day, my HR person see's me, and is seriously freaking out as to why i am there, telling me i dont need to interview, i should just go home. I tell her i want to keep my options open because an offer isnt guaranteed. well low and behold...i get home and have a voice mail with a verbal offer (so two weeks turned into less than 24 hours) It was higher than they originally told me my salary range would be...and it has 4 weeks vacation + great bene's....yea no brainer there. Im still interviewing with the other companies just to see what else is there, but all things point to company #1.

the most important thing is will you be happy working there....as someone else said, quality of life >>>>>> money :)