Is there any year that has only 51 weeks?

FoBoT

No Lifer
Apr 30, 2001
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uh, all years have 365 days (except for leap century or whatever when it is 366? or not?)
so there are always 52 weeks

i think
 

DrPizza

Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
Mar 5, 2001
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Didn't the OP ask another retarded question earlier today?

51 weeks, times 7 days in a week, = 357 days.
52 weeks, times 7 days in a week, = 364 days.

So, ALL years have 52 weeks and at least 1 extra day... leap years 2 extra days. Leap years occur every four years, except if you live long enough, there won't be a leap year in 2100.
 

amol

Lifer
Jul 8, 2001
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Originally posted by: DrPizza
Didn't the OP ask another retarded question earlier today?

51 weeks, times 7 days in a week, = 357 days.
52 weeks, times 7 days in a week, = 364 days.

So, ALL years have 52 weeks and at least 1 extra day... leap years 2 extra days. Leap years occur every four years, except if you live long enough, there won't be a leap year in 2100.

or 2200 or 2300
 

yhelothar

Lifer
Dec 11, 2002
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Originally posted by: Amol
Originally posted by: DrPizza
Didn't the OP ask another retarded question earlier today?

51 weeks, times 7 days in a week, = 357 days.
52 weeks, times 7 days in a week, = 364 days.

So, ALL years have 52 weeks and at least 1 extra day... leap years 2 extra days. Leap years occur every four years, except if you live long enough, there won't be a leap year in 2100.

or 2200 or 2300

How about 2051?
 

nineball9

Senior member
Aug 10, 2003
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When continental Europe converted from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar, the calendar was pushed ahead 10 days. In 1582, October 5 through October 14 simply vanished and never existed!

By the time anti-Papist Britain and its colonies adopted the Gregorian Calendar in 1752, it was an 11 day jump. (Which is why George Washington wasn't born on George Washington's birthday, February 22, 1732. In addition, the Julian year began in March, at least in Britain anyway.)

Russia did not adopt the Gregorian calendar until the Russian Revolution in 1918, (Which explains why the Soviets celebrated their "October Revolution" in November.)

Finally, the Eastern Orthodox church never adopted the Gregorian calendar.

So with these calendar changes - the Gregorian Calendar adoption dates - one can find find a short year using the so-called modern western calendar.

(From the dawn of civilization, many different cultures have developed many different calendars. Some calendars are/were solar based, others lunar based while some are/were a combination - eg: the Hebrew and Islamic calendars. The Mayans even included the morning star appearance cycle of Venus in their calendar.)