Is there any disadvantage to a hammer drill?

Feb 10, 2000
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I am looking to buy a set of cordless tools (probably DeWalt or Milwaukee), and I am debating between a hammer drill and a conventional drill/driver.

I MAY have a need to drill perhaps one hole through masonry in the foreseeable future, but the drill will mostly be used for woodworking and other fairly light duties. I will also be using it fairly often as a driver.

Is there any disadvantage to a hammer drill when you're using it for regular duties as a drill/driver?
 

lokiju

Lifer
May 29, 2003
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Well most hammer drills you can turn off the hammer function, so there is no down side except they usually cost more.
 

laurenlex

Platinum Member
Feb 26, 2004
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Originally posted by: blazert40
Well most hammer drills you can turn off the hammer function, so there is no down side except they usually cost more.
Correct answer. /thread

 

lokiju

Lifer
May 29, 2003
18,536
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Originally posted by: Excelsior
Are they much more? Id say don't bother getting a hammer drill.
They are great to have when you need to go through concrete, if you don't have a hammer drill you'll just end up burning up bits.

If the money isn't an issue for you I'd say get the hammer.

 

desk

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2004
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Originally posted by: laurenlex
Originally posted by: blazert40
Well most hammer drills you can turn off the hammer function, so there is no down side except they usually cost more.
Correct answer. /thread
they are a little heavier also.
 

AndrewR

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
11,157
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Originally posted by: oneshot47
and bigger
After using my cordless (Craftsman 18V) drill quite a bit (no pun intended) lately, I'd say this is a serious consideration. While the Craftsman is not heavy, if there were any more added weight, it would be cumbersome to maneuver.

You can always rent a hammer drill if you really need one (or find a neighbor with one!).
 

Ornery

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
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Buy this Milwaukee Lok-Tor? Combo Kit Discount Price $429.88
  • ...get ONE of the following free: A Jobsite Radio, A Multi-Bay Charger, Two (2) 18V batteries, or an 18V ½? Impact Wrench by Mail in Rebate. Offer ends July 8, 2005. Click here for details
    • Hammer-Drill provides up to 495 in./lbs. of torque and up to 1700 rpm and features an all-metal ratcheting chuck with carbide jaws for the highest grip torque on bits
      Part of the new Lok-Tor TM series - Lok-Tor TM delivers higher torque, higher speeds, longer run-time and the increased durability and quality
    • Sawzall "The Hatchet TM " features a 6 position pivoting handle and an orbital action selector for aggressive wood cutting or straight reciprocating action for metal and plastics
      Sawzall is only 13" long when fully pivoted, allowing you to cut in tight spaces
    • 6-1/2" circular saw cuts up to 145 2x4's on one charge!
      Circular saw cuts 2 by material at a 45 degree bevel in one pass. Features a comfortable soft-grip handle, 50 degree bevel capacity, 3200 RPM motor, and electric brake
    • Multiposition flashlight has strong beam and stays where you put it
    • Milwaukee's exclusive reversible battery allows users to adjust balance and get into tight spaces
      Includes: Hammer drill, "The Hatchet TM " sawzall, circular saw, worklight, three batteries, charger, and contractor bag
 

hippy

Senior member
Oct 9, 1999
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Originally posted by: DonVito
I am looking to buy a set of cordless tools (probably DeWalt or Milwaukee), and I am debating between a hammer drill and a conventional drill/driver.

I MAY have a need to drill perhaps one hole through masonry in the foreseeable future, but the drill will mostly be used for woodworking and other fairly light duties. I will also be using it fairly often as a driver.

Is there any disadvantage to a hammer drill when you're using it for regular duties as a drill/driver?
Weight.

 

hippy

Senior member
Oct 9, 1999
952
0
71
Originally posted by: DonVito
Originally posted by: hippy

Weight.
They're both a little on the heavy side, but the hammer drill is only 0.05 pounds heavier than the drill/driver.
I can only say to pick what you feel works best in the long run for what you need... don't let the Dark Side persuade you young skywalker. :p

 

ShadesOfGrey

Golden Member
Jun 28, 2005
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Buy the Dewalt kit you are looking at(linked). DeWalt in my experience has been a better cordless drill than others.

 

Ozoned

Diamond Member
Mar 22, 2004
5,578
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Originally posted by: DonVito
Originally posted by: hippy

Weight.
They're both a little on the heavy side, but the hammer drill is only 0.05 pounds heavier than the drill/driver.
Weight, increased energy consumption and more moving parts. I would avoid the hammer drill if you don't think you will use it.
 

Nitemare

Lifer
Feb 8, 2001
35,466
1
76
Originally posted by: Ozoned
Originally posted by: DonVito
Originally posted by: hippy

Weight.
They're both a little on the heavy side, but the hammer drill is only 0.05 pounds heavier than the drill/driver.
Weight, increased energy consumption and more moving parts. I would avoid the hammer drill if you don't think you will use it.
But if he ever thinks he will need to drill through concrete by all means get a hammer drill.
 

ShadesOfGrey

Golden Member
Jun 28, 2005
1,523
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Nitemare - While the Milwaukee certainly is a good kit - the DeWalt Drill is superior due to not having an angled handle like the Milwaukee. Users preference I suppose.
 

Ozoned

Diamond Member
Mar 22, 2004
5,578
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Originally posted by: DonVito


I MAY have a need to drill perhaps one hole through masonry in the foreseeable future, but the drill will mostly be used for woodworking and other fairly light duties. I will also be using it fairly often as a driver.
A good cordless tool will fit like a glove. I have literally, scores of them. I rarely choose to use my 1/2" drill over a 3/8 drill for anything except heavy duty drilling. I find it quite cumbersome for the type of chores that you describe. Weight is a huge factor if you are going to drill more than just a few holes. Weight is also a huge factor if you are going to do detailed work...

 

Pepsi90919

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
25,162
1
81
Originally posted by: Ornery
Buy this Milwaukee Lok-Tor? Combo Kit Discount Price $429.88
  • ...get ONE of the following free: A Jobsite Radio, A Multi-Bay Charger, Two (2) 18V batteries, or an 18V ½? Impact Wrench by Mail in Rebate. Offer ends July 8, 2005. Click here for details
    • Hammer-Drill provides up to 495 in./lbs. of torque and up to 1700 rpm and features an all-metal ratcheting chuck with carbide jaws for the highest grip torque on bits
      Part of the new Lok-Tor TM series - Lok-Tor TM delivers higher torque, higher speeds, longer run-time and the increased durability and quality
    • Sawzall "The Hatchet TM " features a 6 position pivoting handle and an orbital action selector for aggressive wood cutting or straight reciprocating action for metal and plastics
      Sawzall is only 13" long when fully pivoted, allowing you to cut in tight spaces
    • 6-1/2" circular saw cuts up to 145 2x4's on one charge!
      Circular saw cuts 2 by material at a 45 degree bevel in one pass. Features a comfortable soft-grip handle, 50 degree bevel capacity, 3200 RPM motor, and electric brake
    • Multiposition flashlight has strong beam and stays where you put it
    • Milwaukee's exclusive reversible battery allows users to adjust balance and get into tight spaces
      Includes: Hammer drill, "The Hatchet TM " sawzall, circular saw, worklight, three batteries, charger, and contractor bag
you are a bot. who the hell takes the time to format all their posts like this? :confused:
 
Feb 10, 2000
30,029
66
91
Originally posted by: Ozoned

A good cordless tool will fit like a glove. I have literally, scores of them. I rarely choose to use my 1/2" drill over a 3/8 drill for anything except heavy duty drilling. I find it quite cumbersome for the type of chores that you describe. Weight is a huge factor if you are going to drill more than just a few holes. Weight is also a huge factor if you are going to do detailed work...
What do you like in a lighter-duty 3/8 cordless drill? Ideally it'd still be 18V, just so it could share batteries with a circular saw and jigsaw. Unfortunately all the prepackaged kits use 1/2-in drills . . .
 

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