Question Is It Normal to Have Two Different WiFi Networks With a WiFi Extender?

ascendant

Member
Jul 22, 2011
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So, I bought a wifi extender recently so I could get service on the far side of my house. To set this extender up, I had to create a secondary WiFi network specifically for the extender. It's a bit annoying, as if I go towards the bathroom or laundry room, I have to switch to the extender network, but if I head to the bedrooms, I have to switch to the original wifi network or it's laggy.

Is this typical of extenders? I used one a VERY long time ago, and from what I remembered, I don't recall it creating a 2nd network, just extending the signal of the original one. Just wanted to see if this is typical of them, or if I just have a PoS one?
 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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What make and model? You might be better off with installing DD-WRT or OpenWRT if it is supported. When I needed multiple access points to cover my usage area I had them all using the same SSID but different channels (you need to check all your settings to see what channels are actually free as most of the systems are now using extended channel ranges to support additional bandwidth to the devices, but that makes it more difficult for additional access points to be in use due to channel overlap).
 
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ascendant

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Jul 22, 2011
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What make and model? You might be better off with installing DD-WRT or OpenWRT if it is supported. When I needed multiple access points to cover my usage area I had them all using the same SSID but different channels (you need to check all your settings to see what channels are actually free as most of the systems are now using extended channel ranges to support additional bandwidth to the devices, but that makes it more difficult for additional access points to be in use due to channel overlap).
Thanks for the info, and as far as the make and model, here is the one I have here:

 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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Ok with that device, you do NOT want to use repeater mode unless you absolutely have to do so. You really want to use AP mode where-in you connect it via a wired ethernet cable. It is a 2.4 device, meaning you already only have 3 usable channels without overlaps and only if you are not using HT20 or HT40 (with HT40, there is only 1 non-overlapping channel, HT20 technically only has 1 non-overlapping channel as well, but with 2 choices with at least half the data always going to be overlapping between the two).

So in repeater mode, the device needs to be well within range of your main WiFi router, so that it can connect to it via one of it's antenna and then rebroadcast over the other. This means that all data going to the repeater has high probability of dealing with delays and collisions. In AP mode, there is no need to put the extender well within range of your main WiFi router, and instead, you simply place it in the area that you have the worst WiFi coverage and run a wire to it.
 
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Tech Junky

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Jan 27, 2022
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@Fallen Kell reading between the lines of being on the far side of the house assume there's no Ethernet for a backhaul to the cheap repeater. AP mode won't work w/o a cable so, repeater is the next best option w/o having 2 SSID's.
 
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ascendant

Member
Jul 22, 2011
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Reset it with a paper clip and connect it to your laptop and configure it again in repeater mode.
Well, that was a waste of 5mins. It can't be configured in repeater mode on this model. The one and only way it lets you configure it is as the extender network separate from the original.

I'm just returning this PoS. It's more annoying than it is helpful.
 
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Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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You are better off buying a cheap wifi router that support DD-WRT or OpenWRT to do what you are trying to do.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
29,377
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And what is so good with Repeaters?

Unless it is very expensive Pro that has double Transmitter/Reciter, all sub few hubdreds units reduce the Bandwitdh by 50%.

All if these gizmos all depends more on the enviroment and actual needs, and Not on marketing Numerical "Bluffs".

So.. what one can do?? Either look intro the Pro expensive na of Extenders/Reapeaters.

Or... if One knows how istall twp or three Ethernet wires leading to good spots in the environment and put there APs, or Wirless Routers configured as AP.

:cool:
 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
5,901
380
126
And what is so good with Repeaters?

Unless it is very expensive Pro that has double Transmitter/Reciter, all sub few hubdreds units reduce the Bandwitdh by 50%.

All if these gizmos all depends more on the enviroment and actual needs, and Not on marketing Numerical "Bluffs".

So.. what one can do?? Either look intro the Pro expensive na of Extenders/Reapeaters.

Or... if One knows how istall twp or three Ethernet wires leading to good spots in the environment and put there APs, or Wirless Routers configured as AP.

:cool:
Agreed. A proper AP is the correct solution with a wired backhaul (i.e. network cable, or even using Powerline network adapters, or MoCA (ethernet over coax)) to extend the WiFi network.
 

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