Is a 60W bulb in a 100W socket safe?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Legend, Aug 21, 2005.

  1. Legend

    Legend Platinum Member

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    I'm a n00b. Enlighten me.
     
  2. dartworth

    dartworth Lifer

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  3. Legend

    Legend Platinum Member

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    Seriously. I don't want to have to go back to walmart. Gas is fvcking expensive.
     
  4. Shawn

    Shawn Lifer

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    huh? 100w socket?
     
  5. Anubis

    Anubis No Lifer

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    WTF is a 100w socket?
     
  6. PHiuR

    PHiuR Diamond Member

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  7. Legend

    Legend Platinum Member

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    So there's no such thing as a 100 W socket? The power applied is variable?
     
  8. Engineer

    Engineer Elite Member

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    If you are placing a lower wattage bulb in a socket built for a higher wattage and the voltage is the same for the two bulbs, then yes, it's perfectly fine.
     
  9. Anubis

    Anubis No Lifer

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    sre you talking about a normal light socket?

    because they cna take ANY light bulb from say 15w to 1000w
     
  10. Leros

    Leros Lifer

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    A lower wattage bulb is safe, but higher may not be.

    For those of you that dont understand, some lamps and fixutres say "rated for XXXw bulb"
     
  11. Bozono

    Bozono Banned

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    A Legend in your own mind. Should be fine, though it's life will likely be shortened.
     
  12. Engineer

    Engineer Elite Member

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    Yes, light fixtures (sockets) are rated at a maximum wattage. Many ceiling fans, for instance, have sockets rated at 75 W per bulb. Many enclosed fixtures (sockets) are rated at 60W because of heat buildup. Also, some sockets may have smaller wiring leading to them that a 100W bulb might be a potential fire hazzard, but not likely as a 100W bulb pulls around one amp and it takes one hell of a small wire to not withstand one amp! :)
     
  13. Black88GTA

    Black88GTA Diamond Member

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    But the wires used to construct the fixture may only be rated to a certain wattage. If a bulb draws 500 watts, and the wires are rated to 100 watts - you're gonna have a fire.

    As Engineer said, 60w bulbs in a socket rated at 100 will be fine, as long as voltage is the same.
     
  14. Shawn

    Shawn Lifer

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    wtf are you people talking about?!?

    OP if you are talking about a light fixture that's rated for a maximum of 100w then you can use any bulb that's 100w or under.
     
  15. Pepsi90919

    Pepsi90919 Banned

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    it's "maximum 100W" not just "100W"
     
  16. Legend

    Legend Platinum Member

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    It's built into the ceiling.

    It wouldn't give the 60W bulb any light. The bulb works for a lamp so it's not the bulb. Unfortunately I can't test the old 100W bulb anywhere else. I just moved into this apartment.
     
  17. amdhunter

    amdhunter Lifer

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    No. Its not safe.
     
  18. Spencer278

    Spencer278 Diamond Member

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    The maximum watts is just the company covering there ass. Fee free to put what ever light bulb in that you want.
     
  19. villageidiot111

    villageidiot111 Platinum Member

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    That is the best pun I have heard all day! Made me laugh.
     
  20. Atheus

    Atheus Diamond Member

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    "I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question."

    Charles Babbage
     
  21. Legend

    Legend Platinum Member

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    Nevermind, It works now.

    Sad thing is I'm a computer engineer student. They don't teach us the simplest things about hardware.

    So

    Power = I*R^2
    V = I*R

    If V = 120, and R is variable, I didn't understand that current is changing.
     
  22. Reel

    Reel Diamond Member

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    For energy and heat conservation reasons, it is best to use the lowest wattage bulb that satisfies your lighting requirements. There is no harm in using a lower wattage bulb in a socket.
     
  23. Spencer278

    Spencer278 Diamond Member

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    It isn't really that simple because your light bulb isn't purely resistive and your using AC current.
     
  24. Wonderful Pork

    Wonderful Pork Golden Member

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    uh, if R is variable, then i doesnt have to change :confused:

    If R is fixed then i will change depending on voltage or power.
     
  25. Legend

    Legend Platinum Member

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    Ok, that makes more sense.

    Both bulbs are 120 V. Voltage is constant. I was assuming that resistance was purely changing the power and current was constant. With that in mind, V=I*R would not make sense because R changes while I and V remain constant.

    In math:

    120 = 5 * x
    120 = 5 * y

    y cannot equal x

    thus the equations are false