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Intel begins selling multiplier unlocked CPUs

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ShawnD1

Lifer
May 24, 2003
15,999
1
0
Originally posted by: Nemesis 1
Originally posted by: ShawnD1
I think it's more shocking that they haven't done this in the past. Having an unlocked multiplier does not affect business computers, other OEM computers, or even most custom computers. All the locked multiplier does is alienate the enthusiast market. Intel's marketing team must be run by idiots if it took them 40 years to figure out that alienating people is bad.
Ya really should learn the history of unlocked multi. In the beginning they were unlocked but people bought them and sold them as higher cost cpus .
This issue was already answered by Idontcare:
For example even if you overclock your E6600 to 3GHz, you can't do anything to make the boot-up screen report your E6600 as a E6850.
He's right. My unlocked Phenom 9600 is running at 2600mhz right now instead of 2300 but it still shows up as "AMD Phenom X4 9600 Black Edition". Changing the multiplier does not change the displayed name of the processor.
 

Nemesis 1

Lifer
Dec 30, 2006
11,379
0
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Ya know I shouldn't have to repeat this. Its been said so many times befor . Intel Builds for the masses not us. Intel sells to make a profit not lose money. You buy the cpu best bang for the buck. Normal people by according to price or performance from Dell . The Hotties buy $$$$ VOdoos or Alienware. Way over the top on price .

We that do self builds or custom builds Think in differant terms also . I see many say why would ya buy the $1ooo Intel . Most laugh . But what if your selling custom PCs and O/C to 4.2+ . For self thats fine. But for customer the $1000 cpu is best choice unless you don't warranty your work . But O/C just the multi. and leaving memory at 1600 is not a bad thing to do . For stability issues.

Stop believing Intel is building for us . There not. There building for the masses . Each according to there desires. Thats why all the differant speed bins. Each according to there desires or Wealth. Its easy concept to grasp. Do some real world testing. Which will be faster the 1000 dollar cpu at 4.2 with 1600 6-6-6-15 timing or a cheaper locked Intel At 4.2 with FSB pushed up . The ans might be serprizing as fot stability the 1000 dollar multi unlocked memory at 1600 . Will be positively more stable . Quality is not an option sometimes .

On the unlocked AMDs. I remember AMDs 64 pricing. To be honest you guys that shame intel for there pricies . Should look in mirror to find shame it will be there starring at ya.

I also remember the pricing on ATIs R300. So much depends on who is sucking hind tit. and who does the cring.
 

Gillbot

Lifer
Jan 11, 2001
28,828
16
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Originally posted by: geokilla
Who actually buys an Intel Extreme Edition?
I bought an Intel x6800. Granted, I got it WELL after the hype died off, 45nm parts were out for quite a while and it was used.
 

hans007

Lifer
Feb 1, 2000
20,211
7
81
Originally posted by: Eeqmcsq
I read somewhere a while ago that Intel locked their multipliers because it hurt sales of their higher parts. People would buy the lower part and simply increase the multiplier.
It wasn't really that.

They started locking them in the Pentium MMX days after the first few steppings. I don't think any pentium non mmx were locked just some did not have the higher multipliers at all since they didnt have as many VID pins.

The pentium MMX days they started locking, but i know some pentium IIs were unlocked, but most later ones were not (the earlier hotter running ones I believe a lot were not unlocked).

I don't think intel really cares about people getting more out of their cpu. they could probably put in a clock limiter in their chips now if they cared. the main reason they locked them was that back then the margins were so huge between chips.

I think the biggest example was the pentium MMX. the price difference was something like say $150 for a pentium 166 mmx and $550 for a 233mmx. People would remark the 166s to 233s... after testing them. sometimes they were not all that reliable, sometimes it worked fine, but retailers sold those remarked chips as actualy 233s...
 

hans007

Lifer
Feb 1, 2000
20,211
7
81
Originally posted by: Nemesis 1
Originally posted by: ShawnD1
I think it's more shocking that they haven't done this in the past. Having an unlocked multiplier does not affect business computers, other OEM computers, or even most custom computers. All the locked multiplier does is alienate the enthusiast market. Intel's marketing team must be run by idiots if it took them 40 years to figure out that alienating people is bad.
Ya really should learn the history of unlocked multi. In the beginning they were unlocked but people bought them and sold them as higher cost cpus . Don't blame intel for mans greed. Same thing will happen with these In china or were ever . Crooks will up the multi. and sell as more expensive cpu in a pre built.;

I have a great perspective on mankind and that is this . Man is anything but kind
well i think the difference this time is that these special editions will be the only unlocked ones.

back in the days, all cpus were unlocked, so you would not know if your cpu had been remarked and be unreliable or pushed to its limits, or if it was a genuine cpu.

i could see them still trying to sell it as a complete system though. i guess no one cares if AMD has unlocked cpus since honestly the spread in prices for their CPUs isnt big enough to make it worth while to remark.
 

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