If you link two surge protectors together will you get double protection.

steppinthrax

Diamond Member
Jul 17, 2006
3,990
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I have a freind who has an "in the wall surge protector". He goes and attaches another surge protector to it. Essentailly putting two surge protectors together. I don't know if that makes any sense.
 

Tiamat

Lifer
Nov 25, 2003
14,074
5
71
You get more protection if you get a whole house surge protector installed at the box then use individual surge protectors throughout the house. I am not familiar with in-wall surge protectors though and how much protection they offer compared to whole-house suppressors.
 

BigJ

Lifer
Nov 18, 2001
21,335
1
81
Absolutely not.

The simplest reason is that it completely voids the warranty of both surge protectors. So if anything does happen and either of them fail, you're SOL. On top of this, it is a violation of electrical code (there's a nifty catch-all in the NEC that basically states if you use the device and do not comply with the the manufacturer's specifications on it's usage/installation, it's a code violation). In this event, if something does happen your homeowners insurance is now useless.
 

dandragonrage

Senior member
Jun 6, 2004
385
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Yes, it will increase the protection. Will it be worth it? Who knows. Some manufacturers may tell you only to plug them directly into the wall - this is more because they don't want you chaining 10 power strips together to plug 50 plugs into one outlet. They claim that will cause a fire but all it would do is just trip your breaker.
 

Rubycon

Madame President
Aug 10, 2005
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Surge suppressors work by engaging when a spike occurs above the defined clamping level. If you take apart most electronic equipment you will find that it has basic spike protection built in - MOV's and often a hash filter if it has a digital switching mode power supply.

Daisy chaining surge protectors does nothing and is not recommended as it's another avenue of failure and any contact point creates heat. Even worse is using a power strip with LC hash filtering on a UPS with modified sine wave output. When the UPS is on battery power the distorted sine wave increases current in the inductor, places excessive load on the battery (dramatically shortening battery run times) and can even cause burning!

When lightning strikes a power line it can send very high voltage spikes down the line however the most you will ever see in a dwelling is roughly 6.6kV which happens to be the flashover voltage on secondary equipment busbars. (120-500VAC normally) Popping sounds associated with close lightning strikes is evidence of flashover. 0:34 hereWhen flashover occurs, everything plugged in has been exposed to potentially damaging spikes and should be checked.

These spikes are short lived but can be destructive whether surge suppression is used or not. They occur infrequently and the biggest offender of power anomalies is the induction motor. Universal motors found in mixers, vacuum cleaners, and some power tools give off a hash that can cause interference with some devices and the LC filter present in a better surge arrestor or entry level power conditioner provides adequate rejection.

The best conditioners provide full galvanic isolation using ferroresonant transformers or motor generator combinations. They are expensive and only used where availability is top priority such as medical and mission critical applications.
 

Schadenfroh

Elite Member
Mar 8, 2003
38,416
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Originally posted by: Tiamat
You get more protection if you get a whole house surge protector installed at the box then use individual surge protectors throughout the house. I am not familiar with in-wall surge protectors though and how much protection they offer compared to whole-house suppressors.

I called my power association about this one time and they told me that they do not offer it. Is whole house surge protection available via third party install on the house's end rather than through the power company providing it?
 

Tiamat

Lifer
Nov 25, 2003
14,074
5
71
Originally posted by: Schadenfroh
Originally posted by: Tiamat
You get more protection if you get a whole house surge protector installed at the box then use individual surge protectors throughout the house. I am not familiar with in-wall surge protectors though and how much protection they offer compared to whole-house suppressors.

I called my power association about this one time and they told me that they do not offer it. Is whole house surge protection available via third party install on the house's end rather than through the power company providing it?

I've seen them being sold at Lowe's and Home Depot. You could get an electrician to install it. The units go for roughly 500$, I don' t know how much installation would cost though, but this is typically recommended for people who have nice stereo/home theaters etc.
 

BigJ

Lifer
Nov 18, 2001
21,335
1
81
Originally posted by: Tiamat
Originally posted by: Schadenfroh
Originally posted by: Tiamat
You get more protection if you get a whole house surge protector installed at the box then use individual surge protectors throughout the house. I am not familiar with in-wall surge protectors though and how much protection they offer compared to whole-house suppressors.

I called my power association about this one time and they told me that they do not offer it. Is whole house surge protection available via third party install on the house's end rather than through the power company providing it?

I've seen them being sold at Lowe's and Home Depot. You could get an electrician to install it. The units go for roughly 500$, I don' t know how much installation would cost though, but this is typically recommended for people who have nice stereo/home theaters etc.

The units can be had for as little as $80. If you know what you're doing, the basic ones are VERY simple to install. You need two open spaces in your panel and need to be comfortable enough with electrical to work inside your panel.
 

Rubycon

Madame President
Aug 10, 2005
17,768
485
126
Originally posted by: BigJ


The units can be had for as little as $80. If you know what you're doing, the basic ones are VERY simple to install. You need two open spaces in your panel and need to be comfortable enough with electrical to work inside your panel.

Yes anyone that can install a CB can install one. Pull the meter if you want to kill all the power but in some places opening the meter socket cover may not be permitted.



 

BigJ

Lifer
Nov 18, 2001
21,335
1
81
Originally posted by: Rubycon
Originally posted by: BigJ


The units can be had for as little as $80. If you know what you're doing, the basic ones are VERY simple to install. You need two open spaces in your panel and need to be comfortable enough with electrical to work inside your panel.

Yes anyone that can install a CB can install one. Pull the meter if you want to kill all the power but in some places opening the meter socket cover may not be permitted.

Or you could, you know, throw the main ;)

A person shouldn't be working in a service panel if they think they'll be running into the service wires in a panel.