if my fluorescent light works intermittently, does that mean the bulb is about to go?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by MagnusTheBrewer, Aug 30, 2009.

  1. zinfamous

    zinfamous No Lifer

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    It is indeed much better, I suppose...but "clean coal" is an insane misnomer.
     
  2. zinfamous

    zinfamous No Lifer

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    Sometimes, I think people just post threads in OT only to see how Rubycon will respond
    :)
     
  3. dawp

    dawp Diamond Member

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    just might be corosion in some of the contacts too. had that problem with a saltwater aquarium i have.


    as far as the brightness of CFLs, i got some nice yellowish shaded ones that look almost the same as incadecent bulbs. you just have to try different kinds to find what you like.
     
  4. Rubycon

    Rubycon Madame President

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    CRI is independent of color temperature. You can have a 5000K lamp with a CRI of 50 and another could have a CRI of 96. Those are quite extreme though.

    You've never seen a class P on 120V overheat and open the bimetal protector? 277 and 480 ballasts are going to have faster insulation breakdown for sure but I'm sure there are ancient (tar) ballasts still out there that are snapping on and off. ;)

    p.s. the typical 4100K CW bulb with a CRI of 69 is quite gloomy looking. They've been lighting factories and offices for years before the recent upgrades to better quality lighting in the 90's, namely T8 electronically ballasted fixtures.
     
  5. Gothgar

    Gothgar Lifer

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    is that per plant though?
     
  6. MotF Bane

    MotF Bane No Lifer

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    Is there any question Rubycon can't answer?
     
  7. evident

    evident Lifer

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    why is rubycon so smart?!?!
    she rocks :)
     
  8. Rubycon

    Rubycon Madame President

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    Oh believe me there is plenty. If I knew everything I'd have a field day in P & N. ;)
     
  9. BoomerD

    BoomerD Lifer

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    I think I'd buy tickets to see that...:D
     
  10. Jeff7

    Jeff7 Lifer

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    It looks like that "15 tons" figure is the goal for the entire country's coal-fired power plants.
    Going from 48 to 15 is a reduction of 68.75%.

    Coal power = 335.8 GW in 2006.

    Assuming those are English tons (2000lbs), that's 285.884lbs/GW = 129 675 008 milligrams/GW = 0.129675008 milligrams per watt.
    So for a 100W incandescent, that'd be 12.9675008 mg/hour.
    Vs a Neolite 23W CFL: 2.982525184 mg/hr + (1mg @ start of life)

    Under the new 15 tons rule:
    100W incandescent: 4.052344 mg/hour
    23W Neolite CFL: 0.93203912 mg/hr + (1mg @ start of life)

    Looks like fluorescent wins.


    For tubes, I don't have time to run the calculations, but here are some numbers:
    100W incandescent = 1710 lumens
    32W T8 fluorescent = 2950 lumens
    1.7mg of mercury per tube (Philips Alto II).

    32W of tube = 172.51W of incandescent

     
  11. DrPizza

    DrPizza Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
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    Not quite sure what your point is. Are you implying that the electricity production is far worse for releasing mercury than broken florescent bulbs? If that's the case, then, yes, we already knew that. However, your statistic is meaningless, because not all 15 tons of mercury come from production of electricity exclusively for lighting.
     
  12. Paperdoc

    Paperdoc Golden Member

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    I get the impression (because OP is concerned about replacing the ballast) that the question is about classic fluorescent tubes in fixtures with permanent ballasts, not about the Compact Fluorescent Bulbs that screw into regular incandescent fixtures.

    OP, any fluorescent tube will develop discoloration in bands around each end. This is the result of sputtering of the metal contacts at each end over time. Typically when the bands get real dark is when the bulbs get weak and quit working. And yes, intermittent operation with dark ends usually means the bulb is about to fail.

    By far the most common mode of failure in fluorescent fixtures is the bulb fails. Ballasts last MUCH longer. So since the bulb is so cheap (compared to ballasts) I usually replace the bulb first. If that does not work, only then do I suspect ballast failure.

    In 2-tube fixtures, many people will replace both tubes in the pair rather than just the dark one, on the hypothesis that the second one, being of the same age, is going to fail anyway sometime soon. Others replace only the failed one, and do the other only after it fails, too. Your choice. The replace-in-pairs way tends to happen more when the fixture is really hard to get up to (twice), of in industrial settings where you are paying big bucks to some worker to do two replacements instead of one.
     
  13. BlahBlahYouToo

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    awesome thx.