i7 6700K = 4Ghz.. won't these overheat?

Page 2 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.
Feb 27, 2003
15,108
19
126
#26
Watt/mm^2 can become a problem for heat dissipation.
 
Aug 25, 2001
43,585
533
126
#27
Nope. The blame was on mobo makers with their auto OC and high voltage.
So the mobo makers were to blame, for the +0.1v overvolt, when the CPU detects AVX/AVX2 instructions? That wasn't a built-in mechanism from Intel? Interesting...

Edit: Kind of funny, that if it were the mobo makers forcing the CPU out of spec with overvolting "at stock", and the CPU subsequently throttling under full Prime95 AVX load, that Intel never took any actions against mobo makers to fix the issue, when it was Intel that ended up looking bad because of it.

And of course, this factor that the highest-end K Haswell SKUs were overheating and throttling on the stock heatsink, had NOTHING to do with the fact that on Skylake, Intel no longer even supplies a stock heatsink with their K SKUs, right?

Edit: And of course, if this was all mobo makers fault, then why did Intel make a point of changing the TIM used in the D.C. chips, and even advertising that fact?
 
Last edited:

isamu99

Junior Member
Feb 9, 2013
16
0
0
#28
Out of curiosity do they still sell Phase Changing cases? If so do you recommend them?
 

2is

Diamond Member
Apr 8, 2012
4,287
1
106
#29
Edit: And of course, if this was all mobo makers fault, then why did Intel make a point of changing the TIM used in the D.C. chips, and even advertising that fact?
Mutually exclusive occurrences. Overclockers complained about the TIM since they moved away from solder when they introduced ivy bridge so it's not like it's the first time they've changed TIM.
 

Whyyy

Junior Member
Jan 4, 2016
1
0
0
#30
Just bought my i7 6700k lets hope it doesnt overheat lol
 

KaRLiToS

Golden Member
Jul 30, 2010
1,918
0
81
#32


^^What is that thing anyway?
 

crashtech

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2013
8,917
197
126
#33
That's the one Intel doesn't give away with their CPUs, the TS15A.
 

KaRLiToS

Golden Member
Jul 30, 2010
1,918
0
81
#36
Guys, I was just kidding and being sarcastic. We just don't see many users using those around here.

I know it is the TS15A :D
 
Aug 25, 2001
43,585
533
126
#37
I bought one, for one of my OCed G4400s, but I'm not using it, I'm using a $9 copper-cored 115x cooler off of Ebay.
 

know of fence

Senior member
May 28, 2009
555
0
71
#38
Everything else being equal, yes, a 4GHz CPU will produce more heat than a 3GHz CPU. That doesn't mean it will OVERheat though.
There is also a physical threshold around 3.2 GHz, after which the power consumption to reach higher frequencies goes from linear to exponential. So not only will a 4 GHz CPU produce more heat, it might produce 100 % more heat despite representing just a 33 % increase in in frequency. Diminishing returns from raising voltage and power consumption is why even under liquid nitrogen cooling, only 77 Kelvin above absolute zero, CPUs reach a measly maximum of 7 GHz.
 

Similar threads



ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS