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I dehydrated

ThePresence

Elite Member
Nov 19, 2001
27,730
16
81
Playing softball today. Very hot today. We usually play on Sundays, I have never had a problem before. In the 3rd inning everything just swam before my eyes and I almost fell down. I managed to get off the field and I almost fainted. I drank a bottle of water but I couldn't get back in the game. Everytime I stood up I felt dizzy again. I still feel a little woozy now, an hour later.
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,902
10
81
Happened to me after a round of golf once. Nearly passed out in the shower afterward. Drinking helped of course, but eating did too.
 

Tiamat

Lifer
Nov 25, 2003
14,074
4
71
it takes time for the water to get absorbed into your body. Lucky you caught yourself though, heat stroke and similar is not a fun experience for anybody.

You probably know this already, but anytime you are going to be active, try to get fluids in your body before you start, and during the activity, keep a decent supply of fluids consumed. Of course, you will have to watch your electrolyte intake as well (just as important as keeping hydrated).
 

Chaotic42

Lifer
Jun 15, 2001
33,854
957
126
How much water do you drink per day? On days when I don't do anything (like today), I try and drink a gallon of water. When I'm active it's even more.
 

sniperruff

Lifer
Apr 17, 2002
11,644
1
0
or you might have been on an empty stomach. once i went to the gym first thing in the morning without any breakfast... my eyes just went black and no matter how much water i drank i just sweat it out in like a minute. i had to sit down and eat something.
 

YoungGun21

Platinum Member
Aug 17, 2006
2,551
1
81
I dehydrated last year on our first day of soccer practice. It was 100+ degrees and at the end of a 2 hour practice while we were doing sprints. This year coach isn't taking a chance and we always have water bottles filled with gatorade or water for whenever we need them.
 

TallBill

Lifer
Apr 29, 2001
46,044
62
91
Most of us are dehydrated a lot of the time. Being dehydrated itself is only a factor in becomming a heat casualty. The three levels of heat casualties are heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke.

Cramps are exactly what they sound like. Actual cramping of the muscles. Exhaustion is heavy sweating, dizzyness, light headed, pale skin, feel ready to pass out. Heat stroke is when your body stops sweating, and you do pass out. Brain damage happens pretty quickly when someone actually passes out from a heat stroke, your brain actually is superheated.

Sounds like you were well into the heat exhaustion range, fairly dangerous. You definitely should have not continued, and found some cool shade.
 

ThePresence

Elite Member
Nov 19, 2001
27,730
16
81
Originally posted by: TallBill
Most of us are dehydrated a lot of the time. Being dehydrated itself is only a factor in becomming a heat casualtyt. The three levels of heat casualties are heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke.

Cramps are exactly what they sound like. Actual cramping of the muscles. Exhaustion is heavy sweating, dizzyness, light headed, feel ready to pass out. Heat stroke is when your body stops sweating, and you do pass out.

Sounds like you were well into the heat exhaustion range, fairly dangerous. You definitely should have not continued, and found some cool shade.
I don't remember feeling cramps?
I just got into my car when I was able to make the walk across the field, put my seat back and hit the AC. After about 15 minutes I drove home.
 

TallBill

Lifer
Apr 29, 2001
46,044
62
91
You don't necessarily have to hit each stage. Also, heat stroke is a very serious medical emergency. Like, quick call 911 so this guy doesn't die. When someone dies from a hot summer, its from heat stroke. Physical activity, dehydration, heat are all factors among others.

Also, by being a heat casualty, your chances for being one again are increased.

The Army treats heat casualties as a very serious threat, so thats how I know so much. I've had and taught numerous classes on the subject.
 

StageLeft

No Lifer
Sep 29, 2000
70,150
2
0
It may simply have been heat exhaustion unrelated directly to lack of water intake or fluid levels in the body. Some people are prone to heat related issues and in other cases it may just be a few peculiar factors at play. There's also excercise induced collapse, which one often sees at the tail-end of an endurance rate. Shortly after people cross the finish line, they collapse because they stopped moving so quickly, the treatment for this being in great part putting their head low to keep blood going into it.
 

imported_Imp

Diamond Member
Dec 20, 2005
9,148
0
0
Got close to it last month; bike course had to wear my black nylon, multi-layered jacket in 25+C, sunny weather with a full face helmet and gloves. Finished a two full 'water' bottles in a morning, and one more in 3 minutes after I bought it. Was so exhausted, slept at 6pm to 10am the next morning.
 

Manuwell

Senior member
Jan 19, 2006
900
0
71
It happened to me 6 weeks ago. Lawnmowing between 11.00 am and 1.00 pm with a friend under a burning sun (95+ degrees). Covered from head to toes to prevent sunburns.

I eventually felt seated in the grass, sweating like a pig, unable to catch my breath and my brain was kind of unplugged. I drove back home cautiously and crash in bed for 4 hours.

I barely had enough energy to talk/drink/whatever. Definitely, a bad experience and a good example of what not to do :confused:
 

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