How much louder is 110db vs. 90db?

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Imp

Lifer
Feb 8, 2000
18,829
184
106
No. The military is researching how to make the battlefield quieter. There are other things to think about aside from long term hearing damage at that moment in time though.

I think they were experimenting with $600/set earplugs for use during combat or any activity. It supposedly filtered out booms/bangs but still let voices or "useful" noise through.

Last I heard, they didn't work and are being scrapped.
 

stormkroe

Golden Member
May 28, 2011
1,550
97
91
I've seen those. Its very touching. I have what I would consider super hearing. at 40 i can still hear 17khz sine waves.
I haven't had a test in a loooong time. I can still here the whine of a tube TV being on (around 16-17k I believe), when I was a teenager I could here 18k+ from a piezo on an oscilloscope. I know what you're talking about when you mention very particular hearing, it's what separates people who are good at their job from wal-mart style job when installing public address and setting up sound equipment for studio.
I'm sure that by now I can still here at least 7.5k ;(
 

SKORPI0

Lifer
Jan 18, 2000
18,390
2,302
136
512px-Animal_hearing_frequency_range.svg.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hearing_range

Hearing range
describes the range of frequencies that can be heard by humans or other animals, though it can also refer to the range of levels. The human range is commonly given as 20 to 20,000 Hz,
though there is considerable variation between individuals,especially at high frequencies, and a gradual loss of sensitivity to higher frequencies with age is considered normal.
 

Eug

Lifer
Mar 11, 2000
23,561
982
126
I haven't had a test in a loooong time. I can still here the whine of a tube TV being on (around 16-17k I believe), when I was a teenager I could here 18k+ from a piezo on an oscilloscope. I know what you're talking about when you mention very particular hearing, it's what separates people who are good at their job from wal-mart style job when installing public address and setting up sound equipment for studio.
I'm sure that by now I can still here at least 7.5k ;(
I could hear the whine of a tube TV even when my hearing wasn't great. Dunno about now, since I haven't encountered a tube TV in a while, but I had my hearing measured several years ago when I definitely could hear that whine, and was told my hearing was in the normal range but while it was decent enough in one ear, it was just mediocre in the other. It seems that "normal range" includes mediocre hearing.

Google tells me the whine is at 15625 Hz.

BTW, I bought a high frequency sound emitter for the garden to ward off the deer eating our flowers. It doesn't work, except to give me a headache when I'm near it.
 

JSt0rm

Lifer
Sep 5, 2000
27,399
3,947
126
I think they were experimenting with $600/set earplugs for use during combat or any activity. It supposedly filtered out booms/bangs but still let voices or "useful" noise through.

Last I heard, they didn't work and are being scrapped.

I could of told them that wasn't going to work lol. Low end sound energy will travel through your body. Ear plugs won't fix that.