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Special K

Diamond Member
Jun 18, 2000
7,098
0
76
Technically if you are salaried, then you are paid to do a job, regardless of the time involved.
 

shocksyde

Diamond Member
Jun 16, 2001
5,539
0
0
Originally posted by: Special K
Technically if you are salaried, then you are paid to do a job, regardless of the time involved.
I think this argument trumps all others.
 

senseamp

Lifer
Feb 5, 2006
35,665
5,936
126
Originally posted by: shocksyde
Originally posted by: Special K
Technically if you are salaried, then you are paid to do a job, regardless of the time involved.
I think this argument trumps all others.
So if you can do your job for the week in 2 days, you can just not come in the other 3 days?
 

Special K

Diamond Member
Jun 18, 2000
7,098
0
76
Originally posted by: senseamp
Originally posted by: shocksyde
Originally posted by: Special K
Technically if you are salaried, then you are paid to do a job, regardless of the time involved.
I think this argument trumps all others.
So if you can do your job for the week in 2 days, you can just not come in the other 3 days?
I guess in that case they would be paying you to sit around and play solitare or nef on AT. It's obviously not the same as being on vacation, but you aren't being paid to do any actual work in that case.

If you had to stay over the weekend to finish a project, then you technically wouldn't be getting paid for those days either.

I just think if you are salaried, then it doesn't really make sense to talk about whether or not you were paid for a particular hour, day, week, etc. You get paid to perform certain tasks and meet certain deadlines. It is up to you to ensure that everything is completed on time, regardless of the time involved.
 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
24,510
13
81
Originally posted by: NuclearNed
Originally posted by: lokiju
Background?

Why would I not get paid?
Most salaried workers are payed on a yearly basis (i.e. $100k per year). $100k is constant no matter how many days there are in the year. On leap years there is an extra day for which you don't get paid.
Personally, I just take solace in all the times I've been able to duck out at 4:00 or take a 90 minute lunch without it affecting my paycheck and in realising that I still come out ahead. :p

ZV
 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
24,510
13
81
Originally posted by: puffff
Originally posted by: NuclearNed
Originally posted by: lokiju
Background?

Why would I not get paid?
Most salaried workers are payed on a yearly basis (i.e. $100k per year). $100k is constant no matter how many days there are in the year. On leap years there is an extra day for which you don't get paid.
2 out of 3 places i've worked at, my annual pay is converted to an hourly rate based on 52 weeks a year, 5 days a week, 8 hours a day. i then get paid every week or every two weeks based on a 40 hour week. so an extra leap year day doesnt affect me.
That too. Where I work the salary is converted to a bi-weekly amount and we get paid that fixed amount every two weeks. That means that leap year doesn't affect me either.

ZV
 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
24,510
13
81
Originally posted by: shocksyde
So should we skip every 100th leap year? Does this mean I get paid for an extra .04 days every 4 years? My head asplode.
We do something like that already. Leap years do not occur when the year is divisible by 100 but not divisible by 400. (E.g. 2000 was a leap year but 1900 was not.)

ZV
 

Indolent

Platinum Member
Mar 7, 2003
2,128
2
0
Originally posted by: shocksyde
Originally posted by: A5
Originally posted by: oldsmoboat
Originally posted by: shocksyde
Actually, that's not true.

You get paid $X per year. A year is defined as 365.25 days.
http://www.google.com/search?h...ear&btnG=Google+Search
Counter-Ownage
It's actually 365.24 days/year.
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

So should we skip every 100th leap year? Does this mean I get paid for an extra .04 days every 4 years? My head asplode.
I thought there actually was some complicated rule like this.


checked wikipedia
However, some exceptions to this rule are required since the duration of a solar year is slightly less than 365.25 days. Years which are evenly divisible by 100 are not leap years, unless they are also evenly divisible by 400, in which case they are leap years.[1][2] For example, 1600 and 2000 were leap years, but 1700, 1800 and 1900 were not. Going forward, 2100, 2200, 2300, 2500, 2600, 2700, 2900, and 3000 will not be leap years, but 2400 and 2800 will be. By this rule, the average number of days per year will be 365 + 1/4 - 1/100 + 1/400 = 365.2425, which is 365 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes, and 12 seconds.
 

MasterOfKtulu109

Senior member
May 16, 2006
205
0
0
because of taxes, i figure i work 3 months of EVERY year without getting paid, so a leap year really isn't that big of a deal.
 

EKKC

Diamond Member
May 31, 2005
5,895
0
0
yeah! 3-4 months out of the year i work for the war

*runs away in flame suit
 

DrPizza

Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
Administrator
Mar 5, 2001
49,606
164
111
www.slatebrookfarm.com
But, over the course of 40 working years, quite a few of those February 29'ths are going to fall on Saturdays and Sundays. ;)


</knows that quite a few people are going to hurt themselves thinking about that.>
 

torpid

Lifer
Sep 14, 2003
11,631
11
76
Originally posted by: DrPizza
But, over the course of 40 working years, quite a few of those February 29'ths are going to fall on Saturdays and Sundays. ;)


</knows that quite a few people are going to hurt themselves thinking about that.>
Roughly 2-3 days out of 10, though I'm sure if you actually figured it out it would depend greatly on the particular 40 year span. So after 40 years you have worked an extra week in some circumstances.

If you are paid every two weeks then this does not apply, because you are still being paid a certain amount for every ~80 hours you work. Over time your "actual" annual salary would reflect the extra day worked.

If you are paid on the 1st and 15th, monthly, or annually, the OP has a point in that you are doing additional work without pay. What if you only work this year? Then your salary is very slightly less-per-hour-worked than that of coworkers who have worked over a two year period or more.
 

her209

No Lifer
Oct 11, 2000
56,352
11
0
365 / 7 = 52 weeks 1 day

This means that there are at least fifty-two Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturday. Depending on what day of the week January 1st falls, the next January 1st will fall on the next sequential weekday, e.g., January 1st, 2007 fell on Monday, January 1st, 2008 fell on Tuesday. We can logically conclude that there are 53 Mondays and 52 of the other days for 2007. This means that:

53 x 8 + 4 x 52 x 8 = 424 + 1664 = 2088 hours

Now because 2008 is a leap year, January 1st, 2009 will fall on a Thursday. We can conclude that there are 53 Tuesdays, 53 Wednesdays, and 52 of the other days. This means:

2 x 53 x 8 + 3 x 52 x 8 = 848 + 1248 = 2096 hours

Now if we assume January 1st fell on Saturday or Sunday then:

5 x 52 x 8 = 2080 hours

Unless that year is a leap year then you'd end up with 2088 hours.
 

Cdubneeddeal

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2003
7,476
3
81
I'm exempt as well but get paid for overtime. Whatever my wage would be per hour +$5.00 for anything after 45 hours. You lose.
 

dug777

Lifer
Oct 13, 2004
24,778
4
0
Originally posted by: Tweak155
This only holds true if you get paid by the month on a certain day each month (i.e the 1st and the 15th or just the 1st, etc).

If you get paid weekly, bi-weekly, every 4 weeks, etc...its just a continuous cycle of weeks regardless of what the date is.

I'm bi-weekly so it doesn't matter. But I do know someone getting hit by this ahahahaha.
What is this bi-weekly crap? There's a word for that period of time, 'fortnight' and 'fortnightly'.

I get paid fortnightly, on a Thursday.
 

PeeluckyDuckee

Diamond Member
Feb 21, 2001
4,464
0
0
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: NuclearNed
Originally posted by: lokiju
Background?

Why would I not get paid?
Most salaried workers are payed on a yearly basis (i.e. $100k per year). $100k is constant no matter how many days there are in the year. On leap years there is an extra day for which you don't get paid.
Personally, I just take solace in all the times I've been able to duck out at 4:00 or take a 90 minute lunch without it affecting my paycheck and in realising that I still come out ahead. :p

ZV
Exactly. Even without crunching any numbers I know I'm still ahead by a long shot. The amount of down time I've taken at the expense of the company is absolutely stunning. At one time I was a salaried employee and over the course of that one year, 3 months of away down time was paid out 100% as if I was on the job and performing.
 

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