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Have You Gotten Your Covid Vaccine? Thread.

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vi edit

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 28, 1999
61,338
5,183
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Wife and I are both Pfizer gang. She's at her 8 month, I will be in September. She's going to try and seek out the J&J for us just to get a different mechanic of vaccination introduced to us.
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
18,173
5,413
136
It's also why the single shot J&J vaccine is so important, and shouldn't be left in the dust of the mRNA shots. Easier logistics chain, and easier to administer the full dose since it requires only a single visit.
I have heard the J&J vaccine was based on the way vaccines are traditionally made, either some kind of disabled actual virus, or a strain that does not cause symptoms. But, I heard something recently that says it works differently.
 

uallas5

Golden Member
Jun 3, 2005
1,033
722
136
I'm looking forward to my booster shot. I think my Gates-microchip-thingmy-bob needs new firmware. Sometimes right before I go to sleep I hear this really faint message about not being able to run critical Windows updates.
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
37,498
12,019
136
I hit 8 months about a week and a half before flying to Mexico in early Nov. May or may not decide to wait that long given the state of *broadly gestures at all of TX*.
 
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Dec 10, 2005
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I have heard the J&J vaccine was based on the way vaccines are traditionally made, either some kind of disabled actual virus, or a strain that does not cause symptoms. But, I heard something recently that says it works differently.
Not quite. The adenovirus tech is somewhat new too - it uses a non-competent (ie, can't reproduce) adenovirus to deliver spike protein instructions (in DNA form) to cells in your body.

The mRNA one is carried by lipid nanoparticles, which fuse with cells, delivering the mRNA instructions for making spike protein.

The adenovirus/DNA combo is just more stable than carefully crafted lipid nanoparticles and stabilized mRNA. RNA is not known for its stability.
 

balloonshark

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2008
5,008
1,352
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I wonder when they will tweak the vaccines so they are more effective against the delta variant? I wasn't able to get vaccinated until April but I have a heart cath next week and I strongly believe surgery is in my future. If the surgery is a little ways out perhaps a booster is something I should seek out. Or perhaps they'll have a better vaccine at the first of the year. Is that likely?
 

abj13

Senior member
Jan 27, 2005
989
700
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I wonder when they will tweak the vaccines so they are more effective against the delta variant? I wasn't able to get vaccinated until April but I have a heart cath next week and I strongly believe surgery is in my future. If the surgery is a little ways out perhaps a booster is something I should seek out. Or perhaps they'll have a better vaccine at the first of the year. Is that likely?
I think the threshold will be identifying variants that significantly escape the vaccine, leading to increased deaths or hospitalizations. For the most part, the current vaccines are still effective in preventing hospitalization and death caused by the Delta variant. The problem will be trying to stay ahead of the virus. While there are groups out there exploring the effect of potential future mutations of SARS-CoV-2, the world won't know there's a serious vaccine-escape variant until its too late. And then there will be a delay before the "new" vaccine gets EUA from the FDA, so it will an inefficient process using the current system.

Furthermore, scientists are figuring out what makes the Delta variant so infectious, as one mutation may affect the furin cleavage site. Vaccines may not have a major effect against this mutation, so in some ways, the virus is becoming more adapted to humans in ways that vaccines cannot block.
 

balloonshark

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2008
5,008
1,352
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I think the threshold will be identifying variants that significantly escape the vaccine, leading to increased deaths or hospitalizations. For the most part, the current vaccines are still effective in preventing hospitalization and death caused by the Delta variant. The problem will be trying to stay ahead of the virus. While there are groups out there exploring the effect of potential future mutations of SARS-CoV-2, the world won't know there's a serious vaccine-escape variant until its too late. And then there will be a delay before the "new" vaccine gets EUA from the FDA, so it will an inefficient process using the current system.

Furthermore, scientists are figuring out what makes the Delta variant so infectious, as one mutation may affect the furin cleavage site. Vaccines may not have a major effect against this mutation, so in some ways, the virus is becoming more adapted to humans in ways that vaccines cannot block.
Thanks for your reply. It sounds like the best plan is to wear a good mask, stay away from others when we have spikes like we are currently having and try to take care of ourselves.
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,415
4,047
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Kaiser Permanente explanation of who's considered immunocompromised in the context of being eligible for the boosters:

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended, giving an additional (3rd) dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to immunocompromised people who have had a solid organ transplant or who are diagnosed with a condition that similarly reduces immune function. The CDC does not recommend using an antibody (serologic) test to determine if an additional dose is needed and only recommends it for those with qualifying conditions. Age alone is not a condition that makes an individual eligible for an additional dose. There is not yet an authorization for an additional dose for those who received the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine.
 

Bitek

Diamond Member
Aug 2, 2001
9,710
3,863
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Companies are working on making mRNA vaccines more stable at higher temps. Pfizer and Moderna are both trying out freeze drying as an alternative.
Eh, that's a big pain in the ass. Problem with lyophilized vaccine would be that you need to resuspend the material in special sterile water (SWFI, sterile water for injection), while continuing to handle all the materials aseptically at the administration sites.

Slows everything down and creates risk. Doing this at a convention center or a grocery store is not a great environment.

You can do it, but not sure if it solves problems on net rather than just exchanging them.
 
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Dec 10, 2005
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Eh, that's a big pain in the ass. Problem with lyophilized vaccine would be that you need to resuspend the material in special sterile water (SWFI, sterile water for injection), while continuing to handle all the materials aseptically at the administration sites.

Slows everything down and creates risk. Doing this at a convention center or a grocery store is not a great environment.

You can do it, but not sure if it solves problems on net rather than exchanging them.
You could always ship to local compounding pharmacies, assuming they would have the capacity to do the mixing.

On the other hand, compounding pharmacies lack proper oversight and don't always have a great track record (looking at you fungal meningitis outbreak a few years ago).
 

Bitek

Diamond Member
Aug 2, 2001
9,710
3,863
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You could always ship to local compounding pharmacies, assuming they would have the capacity to do the mixing.

On the other hand, compounding pharmacies lack proper oversight and don't always have a great track record (looking at you fungal meningitis outbreak a few years ago).
It can be done, but it's just more handling on the administration end. So nurses have to mess about with water and resuspension and all that, then give out the shot.
Seems like it will mostly push Pfizer's problem (distribution chain) onto someone else.

There will be environments were it's worth it (maybe ex-us) but it's not a universal solution.
 

Meghan54

Lifer
Oct 18, 2009
10,273
3,243
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Eh, that's a big pain in the ass. Problem with lyophilized vaccine would be that you need to resuspend the material in special sterile water (SWFI, sterile water for injection), while continuing to handle all the materials aseptically at the administration sites.

Slows everything down and creates risk. Doing this at a convention center or a grocery store is not a great environment.

You can do it, but not sure if it solves problems on net rather than just exchanging them.
Brings back memories of mixing up some good old yellow fever vaccine … back when I’d have a glass ampule to score and break. Hated that crap.
 
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woolfe9998

Lifer
Apr 8, 2013
14,252
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MtnMan

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2004
6,618
4,882
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New question....
Have you gotten your "third" vaccine shot ?????
Do you want one?

Myself, I do and will after the recommended eight week waiting period from the initial vaccination. I think a booster is a good and sound idea. I realized if I wait the eight weeks, that will be about the same time when I am due for my yearly flu shot, so I hope getting the two shots close together won't turn me into a junkie. :p
That's 8 months, not weeks.

I will be at the health department on 10/1/21, my 8-month mark from my second Pfizer. My county is already giving the 3rd dose for those eligible, health care workers and first responders, that got some of the first in December.
 

UNCjigga

Lifer
Dec 12, 2000
23,239
5,783
136
Of course you will because fuck you!
Meh, skipping the booster isn’t that big a deal. I suppose my 8 months would be December 9–I’ll probably try to get one a week or 2 before Thanksgiving so I’m covered for Holiday travel. But I’m more concerned with when my 4 year old and 1 year old can take the vaccine (and knowing that it’s safe for them!)
 

Jaskalas

Lifer
Jun 23, 2004
30,268
3,803
126
Good news. We had over 1 million vaccine doses delivered yesterday. The first time in months we've exceeded that mark. Apparently, fear of Delta is swaying some people to get vaxxed.
It sure as hell convinced me. As news of the current wave began to spread in July. Vaccine effectiveness against Delta became apparent, DESPITE some media doing everything humanly possible to scare people away from vaccination. "Breakthrough cases" "40% effective", that BS is going to weigh heavily on those who are hesitant. The additional data indicating hospitalization rates are lost in the noise.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
73,360
25,106
136
It sure as hell convinced me. As news of the current wave began to spread in July. Vaccine effectiveness against Delta became apparent, DESPITE some media doing everything humanly possible to scare people away from vaccination. "Breakthrough cases" "40% effective", that BS is going to weigh heavily on those who are hesitant. The additional data indicating hospitalization rates are lost in the noise.
I agree, this is a big messaging problem. I think the data shows the vaccines are not super effective at preventing COVID infection but they ARE super effective at preventing an infection that is severe. That’s amazing! If we turn COVID into the common cold then it’s nothing to worry about.
 
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ivwshane

Lifer
May 15, 2000
29,660
10,009
136
Semi off topic.

I had a coworker today who is vaccinated but her husband didn’t want to do it. Monday he got tested because of symptoms and it came back negative. Things got worse and he got tested again, this time he got a positive result. Two days later he’s now in ICU and they’ve put him in a coma and he’s intubated.

They are a young couple with two young kids.

What kind of fucking ego maniac does one have to be to not get vaccinated in order to not put ones family through such trauma?

I feel sorry for her and her kids and I hope he pulls though but I don’t feel bad for the guy at all. Straight selfishness!
 

skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
19,770
1,506
136
It sure as hell convinced me. As news of the current wave began to spread in July. Vaccine effectiveness against Delta became apparent, DESPITE some media doing everything humanly possible to scare people away from vaccination. "Breakthrough cases" "40% effective", that BS is going to weigh heavily on those who are hesitant. The additional data indicating hospitalization rates are lost in the noise.
I posted this elsewhere, but a hospital system near me had 197 covid cases in the several hospitals, and only 1 was vaccinated. Those are impressive numbers. Another system had 76 and 4 vaccinated. Not as impressive but the aggregate is good, at around 2%.
 
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