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Graphic Driver Version in Catalyst 12.10 Package?

tornadobox

Platinum Member
Jun 3, 2001
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Hey guys,

Just putting the final touches on my new build (AMD A10-5800K APU), and downloaded the AMD Catalyst 12.10 package to 'update' my video drivers (I had previously installed the AMD Catalyst chipset package that came with the motherboard, MSI FM2-A75MA-E35, which also included video drivers).

When checking the graphics adapter in Device Manager, the driver version is listed at 9.2.0.0, is this correct (and it's just that the AMD driver package numbering is wonky)?

I just want to make sure I have the latest non-beta drivers for my new rig.

Thanks!
 

tornadobox

Platinum Member
Jun 3, 2001
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Yeah, I noticed that the graphics driver 9.2.0.0 was dated Sept 2012 which also added to my confusion (as the Catalyst package is dated Oct 2012).

Thanks for the confirmation though, glad to know I've got the drivers all set :)
 

Obsoleet

Platinum Member
Oct 2, 2007
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I'd like to hear about your A10 experience.

I intend my 5870 to be the last discrete card I buy, I'll either use it with the next rig or just switch to integrated.
So I'm very interested in how it is for you.

I like Intel integrated for laptop (I have a HD4000 and it works well for laptop gaming), or a Samsung Chromebook is no gaming is required. And have my eye on AMD's APUs for desktop.

The A10 is good enough that I think it's going to be my default suggestion for anyone building a new computer, that doesn't need better graphics performance. The benchmarks show it would possibly even work for my requirements. But it'll be at least another generation of AMD APUs until I upgrade (and it's possible Intel will catch up or surpass them).
 

tornadobox

Platinum Member
Jun 3, 2001
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Hey Obsoleet,

I think the A10 is great. The computer I built is actually for gaming (yeah I know a lot of people will laugh) and I put the whole thing together for less than the price that some people are paying for a discreet video card!

I'm running with 2GB shared system memory (DDR3 1866MHz) which leaves the remainder of my system with 6GB to use.

So far I've been able to run everything I've wanted to, granted most of the things I'm buying/playing are older games. I have the computer hooked up to my TV and intend to run Big Picture (Steam) on it in the long run, then eventually...when it becomes necessary...run the APU Crossfire with an AMD HD 6670 card.

Right now, with just the APU (HD 7660D) @ stock speeds with 2GB ram allocated, at 720p resolution (which is what my TV supports), I'm running Crysis @ ~45fps medium settings and Fallout: New Vegas @ ~60fps medium settings (these are the only two I've tested so far, I plan on running a 3DMark test once all my Steam content finishes downloading).

I would definitely recommend this APU to anyone looking to save some $$ on a build, even if they are a gamer.
 

Obsoleet

Platinum Member
Oct 2, 2007
2,181
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Hey Obsoleet,

I think the A10 is great. The computer I built is actually for gaming (yeah I know a lot of people will laugh) and I put the whole thing together for less than the price that some people are paying for a discreet video card!
They will laugh, especially here. Don't worry, they're idiot kids or immature adults (probably mostly the former, if not all of them). I'm with you though, it's the future and it's an inevitable future.
If it's 'fast enough', then I see no reason to wait. I'm a futurist and a pragmatist. :)
I was an early adopter of dropping the soundcard when most couldn't bear the thought of giving up their Soundblaster and the EAX gimmick. I'm also OK without math coprocessors and physics cards.
You gotta understand there's an asinine amount of paid and unpaid Nvidia people on this board, and just general fanboys. They do NOT want discrete cards to lose their popularity for as long as they can milk the cow. Obviously, I see the way the trend is going and now have more interest in Intel and AMD's integrated products. I could care less if it's Intel Inside or AMD Inside, but I definitely don't want an Nvidia inside my case.

Not to mention what you said about Crossfire working with the APU, and that Crossfire supports mixed mode cards to begin with.. that and the APU has caused me to write off an Nvidia purchase in the future. Too many advantages having AMD product all work together. Not to mention, to my understanding you can power 4 monitors just off your APU?? And it has the standard (excellent) Catalyst features like multiple monitor profiles.

I'm running with 2GB shared system memory (DDR3 1866MHz) which leaves the remainder of my system with 6GB to use.

So far I've been able to run everything I've wanted to, granted most of the things I'm buying/playing are older games. I have the computer hooked up to my TV and intend to run Big Picture (Steam) on it in the long run, then eventually...when it becomes necessary...run the APU Crossfire with an AMD HD 6670 card.

Right now, with just the APU (HD 7660D) @ stock speeds with 2GB ram allocated, at 720p resolution (which is what my TV supports), I'm running Crysis @ ~45fps medium settings and Fallout: New Vegas @ ~60fps medium settings (these are the only two I've tested so far, I plan on running a 3DMark test once all my Steam content finishes downloading).

I would definitely recommend this APU to anyone looking to save some $$ on a build, even if they are a gamer.
I guess I haven't looked into it as much as I should, but you can allocate any amount of memory to the APU? That's pretty interesting if true. Since most people are popping in at least 8GB and more.
It sounds good enough for me from the FPS you described. I'm going to have to look into how the APU + my 5870 work together in this case.

I run Steam in BigPicture mode as well.. I mostly play League of Legends and Killing Floor, among a few other games (I like older games as you do). I recommend picking up Castle Crashers during the Steam sale and Magicka. Both of those are pretty fun if you have the wireless Xbox360 gamepad for PC.
Thanks for the info. :)

I'd like to add, that your point about saving money shouldn't be lost on anyone. I have a lot of money. I just choose to not waste it. I buy for efficiency and bang for buck. It's tough to beat the bang for buck of the A10 IMO. With as fast as the pace moves in hardware, it's kind of silly to continually buy top end every few years. That said, people can do what they want. I want a nicely integrated machine like your A10 personally. When there's a huge APU advancement (and I think over time we'll see the APU/iGPU advancements start to improve the CPU side as well), I'll upgrade and sell or pass down the older hardware.. which will still be a slick rig for most.
 
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tornadobox

Platinum Member
Jun 3, 2001
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76
Not to mention, to my understanding you can power 4 monitors just off your APU?? And it has the standard (excellent) Catalyst features like multiple monitor profiles.
I'm not sure if it can power 4 monitors (I don't personally have that many to test with), but the Catalyst software does seem to have the ability for profiles for 3 monitors at the very least off of the APU.

I guess I haven't looked into it as much as I should, but you can allocate any amount of memory to the APU? That's pretty interesting if true. Since most people are popping in at least 8GB and more.
You can allocate pre-defined amounts of memory (up to 2GB on my MSI FM2-A75 board) via the BIOS, the default was 256MB. My board allowed 256MB, 500MB, 1GB, and 2GB options IIRC.
 

tornadobox

Platinum Member
Jun 3, 2001
2,081
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76
Just ran 3DMark 2011 (the free version), 720p resolution and scored P1577 (this is with 2GB RAM allocated).

Definitely respectable. I'm going to try scaling back to 1GB allocated and see how that alters the results.
 

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