fat don't crack?

Mar 15, 2003
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the wife and I are both admittedly ... cardio impaired.. and have spent every year since before puberty on the wrong side of the scale. now that we're in our mid-to-late 30s and also responsible for the health of two kids, we're eating smarter and are losing weight very slowly, though still have a long way to go. as i lose weight in my face and shaved the beard for the season, i'm realizing that i have the skin of a 20-something, wrinkle and age decay free. i'm not sure if it's the nyc pollution or hard living, but a lot of my peers are REALLY showing their years, the hair dye's not hiding the sun/smoke/alcohol damage anymore.. but we're looking younger and younger, toning up and looking healthy while lots of people seem sickly/tired all the time.

to jump to the point, could being fat through our 20s led to a blubber shield of sorts, protecting us from a lot of the damage our always thins faces are now showing?
 

Azraele

Elite Member
Nov 5, 2000
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I would think skin damage is skin damage. Skin is external, and may get damaged when exposed to lots of sun, pollution, etc. I'm not sure how fat might play into protecting skin. My guess is good genes, less exposure, and now your effort at healthier living and diet.
 
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destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
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the wife and I are both admittedly ... cardio impaired.. and have spent every year since before puberty on the wrong side of the scale. now that we're in our mid-to-late 30s and also responsible for the health of two kids, we're eating smarter and are losing weight very slowly, though still have a long way to go. as i lose weight in my face and shaved the beard for the season, i'm realizing that i have the skin of a 20-something, wrinkle and age decay free. i'm not sure if it's the nyc pollution or hard living, but a lot of my peers are REALLY showing their years, the hair dye's not hiding the sun/smoke/alcohol damage anymore.. but we're looking younger and younger, toning up and looking healthy while lots of people seem sickly/tired all the time.

to jump to the point, could being fat through our 20s led to a blubber shield of sorts, protecting us from a lot of the damage our always thins faces are now showing?
NYC? Your peers are probably sleep deprived, most of us are, but the major metro areas and the hustle seem to make it that much more common. Sleep deprivation is hell on the body, bad diet choices compound it, and this can lead to the folk who are 30 something going on 50 in terms of appearance.

I have not ever heard of fat, be it obese or just a little extra padding, being something good for the skin.

Wait, maybe I need to walk that one back. There are different types of fat, and the most known and worst is the visceral fat in the abdomen. Belly fat. Never a good thing to carry around.
Then there is the general adipose tissue that serves as the fatty layer under the skin throughout the body; this is a good fat! This type of fat produces healthy metabolic compounds and anti-inflammatory agents, which then circle the blood stream. It may very well be that an amount of good fat could be helping to preserve your skin.

I'd still wager diet and sleep may have played a larger role than any benefits from adipose tissue - if you were always heavier, I'd wager you didn't skip all that many meals to press on with some task and then barely slept to boot. All of those "little things" are increasingly becoming obvious as culprits for at least some of our health maladies.

Some people, no matter the situation, career, or lifestyle, somehow can force themselves to always maintain adequate sleep, and some of these could be the fresh faced youthful colleagues surrounded by worn out sleep [and perhaps nutritionally] deprived ghosts with sunken faces.
 

Jon-T

Senior member
Jun 5, 2011
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Could be that your old "eat it all" diet increased the odds of getting a full range of nutrients (along with all those extra calories).
 
Mar 15, 2003
12,516
33
91
NYC? Your peers are probably sleep deprived, most of us are, but the major metro areas and the hustle seem to make it that much more common. Sleep deprivation is hell on the body, bad diet choices compound it, and this can lead to the folk who are 30 something going on 50 in terms of appearance.

I have not ever heard of fat, be it obese or just a little extra padding, being something good for the skin.

Wait, maybe I need to walk that one back. There are different types of fat, and the most known and worst is the visceral fat in the abdomen. Belly fat. Never a good thing to carry around.
Then there is the general adipose tissue that serves as the fatty layer under the skin throughout the body; this is a good fat! This type of fat produces healthy metabolic compounds and anti-inflammatory agents, which then circle the blood stream. It may very well be that an amount of good fat could be helping to preserve your skin.

I'd still wager diet and sleep may have played a larger role than any benefits from adipose tissue - if you were always heavier, I'd wager you didn't skip all that many meals to press on with some task and then barely slept to boot. All of those "little things" are increasingly becoming obvious as culprits for at least some of our health maladies.

Some people, no matter the situation, career, or lifestyle, somehow can force themselves to always maintain adequate sleep, and some of these could be the fresh faced youthful colleagues surrounded by worn out sleep [and perhaps nutritionally] deprived ghosts with sunken faces.
You might be on to something - our diet's more rich than junk food heavy. Lots of good fats and nutrients (ethnic food and clean eating for the most part). I'm especially thankful for how elastic our skin seems to be, not a lot of loose skin (yet, fingers crossed). I also think our netflix and chill slacker life helped, not a lot of sun tanning going on between us. As an ex-smoker i was worried about it, it really seems to have ravaged some of our friends. They probably did harder drugs too, we prefer the mellow stuff.
 
Feb 25, 2011
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A layer of fat does smooth out the wrinkles, and not going outside reduces sun damage. If you get down to about a 23 BMI you'll start to notice your skin hanging. It's pretty obvious with people who run marathons. No fat, lots of sunshine, crinkly skin.
 

Mai72

Diamond Member
Sep 12, 2012
9,770
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Like others have said, a layer of fat is good for skin youthfulness. I eat avacados, organic coconut oil, butter and my skin is wrinkle free as well. And, I'm in my 40s. I also don't have children which helps a lot with stress. I'm also not big on going out in the sun. That's a big one. Laying in the sun, drinking and smoking. I don't do any of those things. I have ZERO interest.

Just enjoy it for now, because eventually you'll get old and the passage of time will make you obsolote. Like it does all of us. For, in the end we all endure the same fate. As the Buddha once stated "The Root of Suffering is Attachment."
 
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DrunkenSano

Diamond Member
Aug 8, 2008
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Sun, lack of sleep, stress, are all big contributors to having worn out skin. So it's not a surprise your NYC buddies look more worn out. Fat is not good for your body at all and should never be suggested to be a good thing in life. Unfortunately, lots of our cheap foods and bad eating habits leads to being unhealthily overweight. I see so many fat kids these days it's sad and not a good sign for society's future.
 

GrumpyMan

Diamond Member
May 14, 2001
5,513
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Maybe it's just that you have ok skin but your vision is going to crap. You may think that you are looking good in the mirror, but perhaps you are really looking like an old boot in the desert..
 

snoopy7548

Diamond Member
Jan 1, 2005
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We'll need pics to make any sort of judgement. Feel free to just post pics of your wife.
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
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Fat is not good for your body at all and should never be suggested to be a good thing in life. Unfortunately, lots of our cheap foods and bad eating habits leads to being unhealthily overweight. I see so many fat kids these days it's sad and not a good sign for society's future.
I was in agreement, until this part.

Dietary fat, as in fatty acids, is not inherently bad. In fact, other than trans fat, all other fatty acids are generally good, especially in moderation. Excessive carb intake leads the body to sequester fat for later, because carbs are less resource intensive to extract energy from, and fatty acids are calorie dense.

And the body needs a fair amount of fatty acid intake just to meet basic life needs - can't grow cells without lipids.

Now you should minimize straight saturated fats, unless it's a soul source of energy - they offer a ton of energy and if burned for energy they cannot lead to harm. Otherwise your diet should be comprised of unsaturated fatty acids, be they mono- or polyunsaturated. The Omega fatty acids fall into this category, as do a host of other important fats. In fact there are a number of them which are labeled Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) -- these are those the body cannot produce on its own, but from these the body can then create a host of others. That being said, it's often terribly inefficient at the conversion - you'd never get all the Omega 3s you'd need from Flax alone, because the body is very bad at converting ALA into the versions found primarily in seafood, EPA and DHA.

There is also good fat [storage] in the body - everybody has it, in fact you absolutely must have it or else you'd be dead. The adipose tissue that accumulates under the skin is generally positive - you can have a little padding equally spread across the body and be in peak health. There's also the intramuscular fat, which IIRC is largely neutral. If you have central obesity, where adipose tissue collects as visceral fat in the abdomen, that is a kind of fat that is very bad for you, and does nothing but wreck havoc. Subcutaneous fat is now recognized as a major contributor to the endocrine system as it manufactures and releases various hormones, as well as assorted immune and other functions.

If you can generally see someone as "big boned" who has a fair amount of padding, but see they don't really have belly fat, that person is probably healthy.
 
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snoopy7548

Diamond Member
Jan 1, 2005
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Any blanket statement of, "____ is not good for you at all" is always false, unless you're talking about cigarettes, hard drugs, and poisonous substances.
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
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Any blanket statement of, "____ is not good for you at all" is always false, unless you're talking about cigarettes, hard drugs, and poisonous substances.
Point being that "moderation" for fat should be essentially an unneeded goal. For too long the grain and sugar lobbies paid for anti-fat legislation, policies, and marketing that completely shaped the national diet and conversation for decades; the notion that dietary fat = body fat become accepted fact.

Aim to eat a diet that's naturally high in protein, fat, with some foods that are high in fiber, and you'll likely get all the carbs you really need. Depending upon your luck sticking to those guidelines, you may need to seek some food that has a moderate carb level to help prevent the damage that long-term carb deprivation can induce. Temporary diets inspired by the paleo diet ideal are great, but they are not sustainable long-term, there will be ill effects - internal cancers most likely. Too few carbs also tends to mean not enough fibers and complex carbs which, perhaps more importantly, means a likelihood that key nutrients were missed, some key antioxidant, flavonoid, terpene, a specific level of an essential amino acid, or some other ingredient that offers physiological benefits. This is actually my largest concern because I loathe most greens and other veges, and it's becoming quite clear that the overall balance of diet is key in determining the odds avoiding many internal issues.

Frankly, I think the surest way if one just wants to wing it: avoid added sugars. Just, ban them. Or set a low and hard limit, because some things may need a little sugar but are otherwise quite healthy in moderation. I suspect the dietary choices following that singular change will be better for every single person who abides by that.
 
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Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
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Sunlight breaks down the collagen in your skin - or something like that. Since my first really bad sunburn at 16 I've avoided the sun like a vampire. I have pretty smooth skin in my early 60's but that runs in the family. When my cousin tells people how long she's worked at her company the comments tend to be like 'did they have to wheel you in in a stroller when you started?'

It's too bad you need sun to make vitamin D but that's easy enough to fix.
 

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