electric roasters

nutxo

Diamond Member
May 20, 2001
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Had Easter dinner at a friends house yesterday and they had cooked the ham in an electric roaster. I was good,, not great. The roaster was interesting. It would be nice to have the oven available when I'm cooking large meals. Is there any way to do ham or turkeys in this thing or does it just steam the crap out of the food?
 

BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
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It should more or less equal an oven I would think though it won't work like a grill or broiler with direct flame heat.
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
79,221
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There are toaster ovens with a rotisserie, though not big enough for a turkey. Do turkey in main oven and the smaller things in convection toaster oven
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
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Had Easter dinner at a friends house yesterday and they had cooked the ham in an electric roaster. I was good,, not great. The roaster was interesting. It would be nice to have the oven available when I'm cooking large meals. Is there any way to do ham or turkeys in this thing or does it just steam the crap out of the food?
If you have the ability to plug it in outside, Oster makes a special electric-roaster, which also smokes:

https://www.oster.com/ovens-and-toasters/roaster-ovens/oster-16-quart-smoker-roaster-oven-red-ckstrosmk18/CKSTROSMK18.html

It's almost as good as my Traeger pellet grill, for 1/6th the cost. I also use pellets in the Oster instead of wood, these ones in particular:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00819OICI

Note that it is for OUTDOOR USE when using the smoker feature...it pumps out smoke like a chimney! I'm actually pretty surprised at how well it does, given the fact that it doesn't have an auger or a fan inside!
 

BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
25,228
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I bought an Oster Smoker Roaster, was delivered to my house today when I was at work. Wife brought it inside opened the box and then left it for me in the kitchen.

After I got home from work, I cleaned it off and set it up with 10 pounds of chicken drumsticks covered with garlic, lime, onion, and pepper.
I added 1/3 cup of Hickory wood chips to each of the 2 corner pockets, and set the temp to approx 275 (it's around 45ish deg F outside currently.)
After 1 hour, I added more wood chips. Have a meat thermometer in the center of the fattest leg, it's reading below it's range of 120-190.
After another 30 mins, temperature still below 120.
Checking it again in about 30 mins.
I'm taking it inside and letting it cool and sticking it in the fridge overnight when it's reading around 170-175 internal to maximize tenderness (I know 165 is safe.)
Then I sleep
Then, after I get some sleep, will be up 8-9am and will log in to work, and then after getting through some emails and some work, will finish the chicken in the broiler to make it crispy, then, bringing it to pot lock at the office.

We have 1 hardcore BBQ guy on the team who is bringing pulled pork, 2 other people on the team have restaurants in the family and will bring fantastic dishes, and a bunch of other people will bring good to excellent dishes because they are food nerds or whatever you wanna call em.

Will post some time temorrow or next week with some results, perhaps even a photograph, but don't get your hopes up.
 
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Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
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I bought an Oster Smoker Roaster, was delivered to my house today when I was at work. Wife brought it inside opened the box and then left it for me in the kitchen.

After I got home from work, I cleaned it off and set it up with 10 pounds of chicken drumsticks covered with garlic, lime, onion, and pepper.
I added 1/3 cup of Hickory wood chips to each of the 2 corner pockets, and set the temp to approx 275 (it's around 45ish deg F outside currently.)
After 1 hour, I added more wood chips. Have a meat thermometer in the center of the fattest leg, it's reading below it's range of 120-190.
After another 30 mins, temperature still below 120.
Checking it again in about 30 mins.
I'm taking it inside and letting it cool and sticking it in the fridge overnight when it's reading around 170-175 internal to maximize tenderness (I know 165 is safe.)
Then I sleep
Then, after I get some sleep, will be up 8-9am and will log in to work, and then after getting through some emails and some work, will finish the chicken in the broiler to make it crispy, then, bringing it to pot lock at the office.

We have 1 hardcore BBQ guy on the team who is bringing pulled pork, 2 other people on the team have restaurants in the family and will bring fantastic dishes, and a bunch of other people will bring good to excellent dishes because they are food nerds or whatever you wanna call em.

Will post some time temorrow or next week with some results, perhaps even a photograph, but don't get your hopes up.
A few tips from a couple Amazon reviews:
This smoker is incredible, easy, and reliable to use. The unit heats up very fast and smokes very well.

I just tried my first boxed pizza in this smoker and I never want another oven pizza again! The flavors from the cheese, meat, vegetables and bread are like a kaleidoscope of bursting flavors. Boxed pizza from the oven was never this good. Fish and poultry have also been very very good smoked in this smoker.

I found the temperature marks around the heat setting dial are calibrated for water in the pan under the rack (wet smoking).

If you want to dry smoke, such as with a pizza on the rack with no water in the pan under it, you have to allow for the smoker getting about 60 degrees hotter than the dial. If you dry smoke a large food item, the difference may only be 40 degrees. At the hot end of the dial, the difference starts going away.

I marked my dial with some enamel paint so I have a calibrated dial when dry smoking. I've included a picture of my dial, and the white dots are each 50 degrees apart from 200 degrees F to 450 degrees F. If you want to mark your own smoker, I'd test these dot positions with your smoker before permanently marking it. Maybe start out by marking your dots with just a pencil.
temp.jpg

One other tip:
Only smoke one chicken or roast at a time to ensure doneness. Only insert wood chips 3 times to prevent bitter flavor.

My advice with Oster smoker is to only put the wood chips in three times at most or you will end up with a bitter flavor. With other brands of smokers, you need to put new wood chips in several times to get a smoke flavor, but, the Oster smoker seems to concentrate the smoke flavor.

Also do not try to smoke more than one roast or chicken at a time. If you put in two pieces of meat, the meat does not cook evenly throughout and you end up having to over cook the meat to get it done completely on all sides. Does a great job of smoking just one roast, but not two or more.

I made a thin wire handle so I could get inserts out easier. (See photo.)
I have tried 4 other electric smokers including the Char-Broil, Masterbuilt, Smokin It and Big Chief. The other brands all had many product flaws and were much more expensive.
This is light enough to carry, it holds the correct temperature and the wood chunks stay lit.
flavor. With the Oster model, because the smoking area is so small, if you put in more wood, you get a bitter flavor in your food.
Summary:

1. Printed temps are for wet smoking
2. Add 40 to 60F for dry smoking (you can verify with a temp probe)
3. Be careful about adding wood to smoke too many times, as it's a small space. I forget how long my pellets lasted, I want to say between 30 to 90 minutes, depending on the heat.
4. If you're doing big pieces of meat (i.e. a whole roast), limit them to just one so that the heat & air can flow around the meat for proper heating. As always, verify with an internal temp probe.
5. Adding wire handles makes removing the insert easier.

Additional notes:

1. It's a phenomenal smoker for the price. I also use it indoors when I need a ton of baked potatoes or whatever, but my oven is busy doing other things.
2. The cord is a bit short, so I'd recommend getting a heavy-duty extension cord.
3. I use mine both standalone & in conjunction with sous-vide projects.
4. Check out the Amazing Ribs website for some great recipes & information on smoking. Be sure to read up on the truth about marinades, injections, the Texas crutch, and brining. A little bit of knowledge & a few tweaks to my cooking, baking, grilling, and smoking processes have gone a long way to stepping up my making-food-at-home game!
5. We have a great smoking thread here that is worth reading through, just for the pics alone!
 
Last edited:

nakedfrog

Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
49,771
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BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
25,228
934
126
10 pounds of drumsticks on the smoker, after about 2 hours
20190503_001719.jpg

Half the chicken barely fitting on a plate after taking out of the roaster/smoker
20190503_004838.jpg

After sticking in the broiler for a few mins to crisp the skin a bit
20190503_010446.jpg

Chicken is all gone, was very good, way better than any chicken I had ever cooked in the past.
 
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BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
25,228
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Made a rack of cheap spare ribs .... I added some brazillian hot BBQ sauce I had in the cupboard about 15 mins before taking off the heat ... only sauced about 1/2 of it though since the wife only like sweet style bbq sauces...

I thought the ribs were magnificent, but, maybe cooked a bit too hot, next time will try to set it a bit lower and slower.
 

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Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
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Pork Shoulder .. left it at about 225 for 17 hours until internal temp got up to 200. Didn't get much smoke since the Oster seems to like smoking a bit hotter than that ... but doesn't matter ... it was one of the most delicious meats I've ever had.
People don't believe me when I tell them about this thing...it's a real gem for the money! Plug it in, insert food & wood, enjoy delicious food!

If you haven't gotten into vacuum-sealing yet, you should give it a shot! I have this one:

https://www.amazon.com/Razorri-Selectable-Preservation-E5200-M-Automatic/dp/B07FT5LWFT

I use these bags:

https://www.amazon.com/stores/node/6705582011

For the rolls, I cut the plastic with titanium scissors:

https://www.amazon.com/AmazonBasics-0188-3-PACK-Multipurpose-Scissors/dp/B01BRGU8R0/

I also flash-freeze many of my foods, so that they hold their shape & don't get smooshed when vac-sealing. To do that, I flash-freeze the food for 2 or 3 hours on a Silpat mat, which is a silicone-wrapped fiberglass non-stick mat. Reusable, washable, and everything peels right off! (I generally don't like them for baking, but I DO love them for flash-freezing!)

https://www.amazon.com/AmazonBasics-Silicone-Baking-Mat-2-Pack/dp/B0725GYNG6

Those are available in different sizes, depending on your freezer space. Bakers use full sheets; at home, your baking sheet is called a "half-sheet". There are also quarter-sheets & much smaller eighth-sheets, so if you have a small freezer or low amount of space, you can flash-freeze on a smaller pan. So you put the mat on a metal baking sheet, put the food on the mat, flash-freeze for a couple hours, then take it out, peel it off, vac-seal it, and throw it back in the freezer. Not all foods need this procedure, but especially for stuff like cookie dough, where you might want to make a 4-pack & have it hold its shape as a cookie dough ball (cut the bag & bake when ready, straight from the freezer!), it's SUPER handy!

Raw meats that are vacuum-sealed typically least 2 to 3 years in the freezer (no air inside = no freezer burn!). I have a deep-freezer chock-full of frozen stuff...steaks, hand-formed burger patties, chicken breast, chicken wings, various pork cuts, fish, etc. Super useful to buy in bulk & save money, especially at places like Costco/BJ's/Sam's Club. Then you just take it out of the freezer & toss it in the fridge to thaw overnight, and smoke it up the next day!
 

Fritzo

Lifer
Jan 3, 2001
40,662
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Roasters = ovens with a hotspot on the bottom. Ham needs to be basted to keep from drying out as a roaster is very dry heat. Also, only heat ham to about 125F, then wrap it and remove it from the heat. It will heat up to 135-140F on its own and should be the perfect temp.

I myself came up with a "double smoked ham" recipe where I put my ham on a smoker for 3-4 hours with a special glaze at the end.

IMG_20190421_151704.jpg
 
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nutxo

Diamond Member
May 20, 2001
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Roasters = ovens with a hotspot on the bottom. Ham needs to be basted to keep from drying out as a roaster is very dry heat. Also, only heat ham to about 125F, then wrap it and remove it from the heat. It will heat up to 135-140F on its own and should be the perfect temp.

I myself came up with a "double smoked ham" recipe where I put my ham on a smoker for 3-4 hours with a special glaze at the end.

View attachment 6300
Is that a spiral ham?
 

nutxo

Diamond Member
May 20, 2001
6,336
165
106
You know I've always avoided those because I've never had a good one. I honestly thought they were only good for potlucks and sandwiches.

Last Christmas my daughter wanted to buy the hams. I didn't notice until Christmas eve they were spiral hams. I looked it up and it appears that most people don't know how to cook em. I packed my ham ( I didn't take a chance on the included glaze ). Cooked it to about 125 and wrapped it. It turned out really well although the bottom few layers were crap ( IMHO). People ate it when they picked at things after dinner calling it ham candy.
 

Fritzo

Lifer
Jan 3, 2001
40,662
905
126
You know I've always avoided those because I've never had a good one. I honestly thought they were only good for potlucks and sandwiches.

Last Christmas my daughter wanted to buy the hams. I didn't notice until Christmas eve they were spiral hams. I looked it up and it appears that most people don't know how to cook em. I packed my ham ( I didn't take a chance on the included glaze ). Cooked it to about 125 and wrapped it. It turned out really well although the bottom few layers were crap ( IMHO). People ate it when they picked at things after dinner calling it ham candy.
A spiral ham simply means it's pre-cut with a spiral slicer. Hams come in three cuts: whole, butt (triangle shaped), and shank (rounded end). I'm a big fan of the butt spiral cut because it has more usable meat. The reason most hams suck is people either undercook them or cook them at too high of a heat. Ham cooks best around 250F for 3-4 hours or until the internal temp hits 125F. Once you get there, start basting it with a sugar-based glaze every 10 minutes. The glaze will start to caramelize and stick to the meat. Wrap it up and let it sit for 30-60 minutes before carving. The rendered fat and tender meat is absolutely heavenly! I do mine on a smoker and the flavor is like a sweet pulled pork.

If anyone is interested, it took a year of trial and error to get this down, but this is my recipe:


Double Smoked Ham:
1 10-13lb butt ham (shank will work too, butt is better)
8 pineapple rings
Maraschino cherries
Favorite KC rib rub (my favorite: https://www.thespruce.com/kansas-city-rib-rub-recipe-335915)
Cheap Yellow Mustard (CYM)

Glaze:
3 cups light brown sugar
3 tbs Dijon or English mustard
1/3 cup honey
2 tbs apple cider vinegar
½ cup whole pecans (OPTIONAL)
12 oz Dr. Pepper (do not use diet)
2 tbs butter

Glaze Preparation-
Add sugar and honey to a stainless steel pot on medium heat until it starts to melt. Once the sugar begins to get pasty, stir in pecans, butter, mustard, and vinegar. Let all ingredients incorporate for 5 minutes, then slowly add the Dr. Pepper. Lower the heat and simmer for 45 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes (make sure nothing is sticking to the bottom of the pan- a wooden or silicone spatula works well here). Let the glaze cool- it should end up the consistency of pancake syrup when cooled. If you’d like it thicker, simmer for an additional 15 minutes.

Ham Preparation-
-Get smoker up to temperature (250F), and add dry pecan or maple wood chips to get white smoke rolling
-Slather CYM all over ham, then generously apply KC rib rub. The mustard acts as a bonding agent for the rub- it doesn’t add anything to the flavor. You can do this the night before.
-Add a water pan underneath the smoker rack to catch any drippings from the ham. Use boiling water to prevent smoker temperature issues. Feel free to use apple juice instead of water.
-Place ham flat side down over the water pan
-Cook ham until it reaches an internal temperature of 120F, then take it off the smoker and place on a cutting board.
-Attach pineapple and cherries to outside of ham using toothpicks, then brush on a generous coat of glaze. Wrap the ham loosely in foil, and return to the smoker.
- Apply a coat of glaze every 10 minutes or so, and repeat 4-5 times. The glaze will begin to thicken. TIP: put the ham in a foil pan or make a tray out of foil to catch the drippings.
- Remove the ham from the grill and wrap tightly in foil. Let the ham sit 30-60 minutes before carving.

The internal temp will rise to 135-140F on its own. At this temperature the fat begins to render, but the meat stays nice and moist. The extra smoke flavor and the sweet/spicy glaze coating with the smoked pecans take everything over the top! This is the best ham you’ll ever eat
 
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