electrcians needed...

dsity

Senior member
Jan 5, 2005
945
2
0
Today my living room lights, tv, and all outlets stopped working. Upon further investigation I found out that the outside AC units were not powered on. (I have two). I did everything to try to get the lights back on....until i turned on all four stove burners (yes i said oven before). When I turned the burners on, lights in my living room turned back on, and so did the tv and outlets. So i was like WTF, but at the same time YAY! (I get to see Lakers Vs. Celtics HD!!) But to my surprise the AC units outside did not turn on. I flip my garbage disposal on....booom lights out again. I turn on burners....boom lights.. I turn off AC/Heater blower because it was not cooling...boom lights out again. The only way the lights stay on is if blower is on....WEIRD. every other appliance/room is fine..
 

Injury

Lifer
Jul 19, 2004
13,066
2
0
Sounds expensive. ;)

How old is the home? Recent rains that could have flooded an electrical box somewhere or anything? Maybe condensation from the AC is building up somewhere that an improper electrical "fix" is being affected.

 

arkcom

Golden Member
Mar 25, 2003
1,816
0
76
I'm having a very similar problem. I'm thinking mice. Let us know what you find out.
 

CorCentral

Banned
Feb 11, 2001
6,415
1
0
Originally posted by: Injury
Sounds expensive. ;)

How old is the home? Recent rains that could have flooded an electrical box somewhere or anything? Maybe condensation from the AC is building up somewhere that an improper electrical "fix" is being affected.

Originally posted by: mrrman
faulty breakers?



I'd go with these first hand.

 

BigJ

Lifer
Nov 18, 2001
21,335
1
81
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.
 

CorCentral

Banned
Feb 11, 2001
6,415
1
0
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.

But why all of a sudden? It's not like the wires came loose overnight. Unless there's a gremlin in there shaking the 220.

 

AlienCraft

Lifer
Nov 23, 2002
10,539
0
0
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.
I was also going to say this. ESPECIALLY when he says he turned on the stove and got lights

Or in a junction box, Mice / rats / squirrels will chew on insulation and could aggravate or even create such a "loose neutral" at a connection.

 

BigJ

Lifer
Nov 18, 2001
21,335
1
81
Originally posted by: CorCentral
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.

But why all of a sudden? It's not like the wires came loose overnight. Unless there's a gremlin in there shaking the 220.

Things fail over time. Connections could've worked their way loose oveer time, he could've had rust and corrosion that built up over time with the contacts or bus bar finally failing. Pests is another common one. Poor connections in the first place. There's a lot of reasons why it could've eventually failed.
 

arkcom

Golden Member
Mar 25, 2003
1,816
0
76
I found my problem, maybe it will help you. One of my outlets at the beginning of the circuit had burn up. When a draw was put on the circuit, power would arc and the light/fan whatever would work for a second and then die. Replaced the outlet, all is good for now. Your problem sounds a little more complex.
 

CorCentral

Banned
Feb 11, 2001
6,415
1
0
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: CorCentral
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.

But why all of a sudden? It's not like the wires came loose overnight. Unless there's a gremlin in there shaking the 220.

Things fail over time. Connections could've worked their way loose oveer time, he could've had rust and corrosion that built up over time with the contacts or bus bar finally failing. Pests is another common one. Poor connections in the first place. There's a lot of reasons why it could've eventually failed.


Hard copper connections usually do not fail. I still say Moisture or a Breaker.
Rust with copper and getting loose over time? Gremlins, or Earthquakes!

 

AlienCraft

Lifer
Nov 23, 2002
10,539
0
0
Originally posted by: CorCentral
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.

But why all of a sudden? It's not like the wires came loose overnight. Unless there's a gremlin in there shaking the 220.
SSSSHHHHH, never mention grem-- you know. They are known to live in electricity.

What do computers run on? ;)
Do I need to say any more?

Re: why connections die.
Mechanical failure from movement, stress @ connector failure, animal activity, Immersion in water, Extreme relative humidity, temperature changes, wire oxidation, die-electric corrosion scale, are just a few actions that cause connection failure, from my experience.

Vibration, forgot to mention vibration.

 

BigJ

Lifer
Nov 18, 2001
21,335
1
81
Originally posted by: CorCentral
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: CorCentral
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.

But why all of a sudden? It's not like the wires came loose overnight. Unless there's a gremlin in there shaking the 220.

Things fail over time. Connections could've worked their way loose oveer time, he could've had rust and corrosion that built up over time with the contacts or bus bar finally failing. Pests is another common one. Poor connections in the first place. There's a lot of reasons why it could've eventually failed.


Hard copper connections usually do not fail. I still say Moisture or a Breaker.
Rust with copper and getting loose over time? Gremlins, or Earthquakes!

What do you mean by hard copper connections? If you're talking about junctions, they can absolutely work their way out of a wire nut over time if they weren't secured correctly in the first place.

I didn't say rust with copper connections. You ever see what rust can do to a main panel and the problems that can result from it? What about massive oxidation on bus bars or on terminals? This could all result in neutrals going out, resulting in problems similar to what he's having.

Aliencraft mentioned above a lot of common causes of connections failing.
 

AlienCraft

Lifer
Nov 23, 2002
10,539
0
0
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: CorCentral
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: CorCentral
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.

But why all of a sudden? It's not like the wires came loose overnight. Unless there's a gremlin in there shaking the 220.

Things fail over time. Connections could've worked their way loose oveer time, he could've had rust and corrosion that built up over time with the contacts or bus bar finally failing. Pests is another common one. Poor connections in the first place. There's a lot of reasons why it could've eventually failed.


Hard copper connections usually do not fail. I still say Moisture or a Breaker.
Rust with copper and getting loose over time? Gremlins, or Earthquakes!

What do you mean by hard copper connections? If you're talking about junctions, they can absolutely work their way out of a wire nut over time if they weren't secured correctly in the first place.

I didn't say rust with copper connections. You ever see what rust can do to a main panel and the problems that can result from it? What about massive oxidation on bus bars or on terminals? This could all result in neutrals going out, resulting in problems similar to what he's having.

Aliencraft mentioned above a lot of common causes of connections failing.

Wire Nuts are a fancy colored blob of plastic over a coiled wire or spring, of varying diameter. That spring is quite capable of storing energy and causing connection failure if the connections is improperly made.

 

dsity

Senior member
Jan 5, 2005
945
2
0
Originally posted by: AlienCraft
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.
I was also going to say this. ESPECIALLY when he says he turned on the stove and got lights

Or in a junction box, Mice / rats / squirrels will chew on insulation and could aggravate or even create such a "loose neutral" at a connection.

Is this something I could do/check myself...or better just leave it to an electrician? Something about electricity that scares the shit out of me.... I hate screwing in lightbulbs..


there has been heavy rain...but not recently. this winter we had an ice storm that cracked tree branches onto our power line....which happened to bend (i do not know what it is called) the pole looking thing which connected the power line to the house.

Also... wouldn't you say that if it were mice...I would see some in the house? I haven't seen a mouse in a while...
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
62,867
11,268
136
Originally posted by: dsity
Originally posted by: AlienCraft
Originally posted by: BigJ
Originally posted by: Greenman
Loose neutrals in the panel, or perhaps a loose hot leg in the panel.

I was actually coming into this thread to post this.

If it's multiple circuits you're having problems with, neutrals/neutral bus are/is a common culprit.
I was also going to say this. ESPECIALLY when he says he turned on the stove and got lights

Or in a junction box, Mice / rats / squirrels will chew on insulation and could aggravate or even create such a "loose neutral" at a connection.

Is this something I could do/check myself...or better just leave it to an electrician? Something about electricity that scares the shit out of me.... I hate screwing in lightbulbs..



Then by all means, pay a professional to fix this...unless you've always wanted to see how you'd look with a 'Don King" hairdo...
 

xgsound

Golden Member
Jan 22, 2002
1,374
8
81
If you hate screwing in light bulbs I'd say get an electrician, particularly if the problem is as described below.

If that stove is an electric one, I'd say a likely culprit is that one of your 110V feed wires has burned, corroded, or the main breaker popped and the 220V stove is completing the circuit (at a lower amperage and in an opposite from normal direction) from the other 110V feed line. If this is the case turn off the 220V devices (A/C, Stove, water heater) immediately. The 220V devices (Stove, water heater, particularly A/C) can be damaged by letting them run this way.

If you turn off all 220V devices and only about 1/2 of your 110V electricity works, but when you turn on the stove burners the other half seems to work 1/2 way, then this is your problem. This is more common with aluminum feed wires than copper wires.


Jim