Drywall Gap question

polarmystery

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2005
3,908
2
81
#1
Hey folks,

I'm currently re-modeling my basement, and I had a question about drywall. Part of my re-model is to add a curb-less shower. The drain is going to be a linear drain at the right side of the shower at the bottom of the slop (see pic). I understand that when you hang drywall, you are supposed to leave a gap between the foundation and the drywall base (I used a 1/2" around the perimeter).

My question is, when I add tile to the shower (floor and wall), are you supposed to put a waterproof membrane all the way down to the bottom of the floor (thereby covering the drywall gap), or just to the edge of the drywall? I think the answer is put the membrane to the bottom, and when I combine the underlayment with the wall membrane it will be sealed off. I just want to make sure.

Any thoughts, tips are appreciated.

Model pics attached
 

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herm0016

Diamond Member
Feb 26, 2005
6,649
68
106
#2
yes you need to waterproof your shower. I think i would use cement board and redguard. you really should not have drywall behind the tile or whatever your finish is at all.
 
Oct 15, 1999
13,977
848
126
#3
Waterproof the shower pan and the walls. Don't use sheetrock anywhere in the shower. Hardibacker, wonderboard, goboard, or densheild will do the job.
 

rsutoratosu

Platinum Member
Feb 18, 2011
2,668
2
81
#4
Yup.. they will get moldy and break apart behind
 

polarmystery

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2005
3,908
2
81
#5
Alright noted. I am all new to this so any feedback is appreciated. What about the ceiling above the shower? I'm not putting tile on it, just the three surrounding walls. (Picture attached w/update).

I found a youtube video explaining the gap as well (stating the backer-board has that gap, and you fill the gap with the tile.
 

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Sukhoi

Elite Member
Dec 5, 1999
15,111
5
81
#6
When I first met my wife she was renting a room from a slumlord. The guy had converted a tub to a shower simply by adding a showerhead. The walls were still painted drywall. They were squishy.
 

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