[Digital Trends] Nvidia RTX 2080 Ti Graphics Cards Are Dying in Alarming Numbers

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Krteq

Senior member
May 22, 2015
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#51
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4g5CZCaWXo

GamerNexus suggests some of the issues could be related with display dependent. I had BSODs similar to this with my 2080 Ti and my 3 different monitors blue screened on all of them.
Display controller built in GPU is taking down a whole GPU? I don't thing that's a RC of this issue.

.... or nVidia messed up display controller once again - remember Paxwell display port issues?
 

amenx

Platinum Member
Dec 17, 2004
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#52
GN has a follow up vid to that. (Half) dead 2080ti wont go above 1350mhz. Also says he is seeing a larger pattern of problematic RTX cards as people are sending him their dead/problem cards for analysis.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0dRm5DqHWQ
 

n0x1ous

Platinum Member
Sep 9, 2010
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#53
waiting to see the results for the artifacting cards since thats what most of the problems seem to be. 1 of mine included.
 

n0x1ous

Platinum Member
Sep 9, 2010
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#54
There is a user on the nvidia forums claiming to have 2080ti FE's with Samsung GDDR6. I asked for clarification if that is the case on his replacement cards. If so that would certainly give weight to the Micron VRAM being the problem

EDIT: many users now reporting their replacement cards have Samsung GDDR6 and a new bios
 
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MrTeal

Platinum Member
Dec 7, 2003
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#56
At least we've finally answered the question "Can it run Space Invaders?"
 

Gikaseixas

Platinum Member
Jul 1, 2004
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#59
They're lucky the competition is bad right now. Still have time to correct the issue.
Feel kinda bad for early adopters thou
 
Aug 14, 2000
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#60
Supposedly the 2080TI has been pulled from nVidia's website because of these issues.
 

psolord

Golden Member
Sep 16, 2009
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#63
It's like the God of IT is trying to give AMD a chance and AMD is like, "no I'm asleep now, try again later but here's a third Polaris"!
 

ZGR

Golden Member
Oct 26, 2012
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#65
With Samsung GDDR6 on some failing cards, I have to wonder what the heck the root cause of failure is. This is one of the worst GPU launches of this decade.


I do hope we learn why these cards are failing, because right now I have very little confidence in the 2000 series.
 

Kippa

Senior member
Dec 12, 2011
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#67
I know that there have been a lot of reports on the 2080ti going tits up, I was just wondering if any of you lot have heard of any problems people are having with Quadro Turing cards? I haven't heard about any failings with them yet.
 
Apr 27, 2000
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#68
It's like the God of IT is trying to give AMD a chance and AMD is like, "no I'm asleep now, try again later but here's a third Polaris"!
AMD doesn't care about the consumer market right now. Look at where they are selling Vega20. Navi is an afterthought.

With Samsung GDDR6 on some failing cards, I have to wonder what the heck the root cause of failure is. This is one of the worst GPU launches of this decade.


I do hope we learn why these cards are failing, because right now I have very little confidence in the 2000 series.
If the failures can be definitively linked to the memory subsystem and can be found with both Hynix and Samsung VRAM, then the next logical place to look is the memory controller. That being said, with some of the cards going into "partial failure" mode where they can operate with limited GPU clocks, I have to wonder if the problem is the memory subsystem at all.

Either that, or we are seeing failures on multiple levels. That will make diagnosis all the more difficult.
 
Mar 11, 2004
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#69
AMD doesn't care about the consumer market right now. Look at where they are selling Vega20. Navi is an afterthought.



If the failures can be definitively linked to the memory subsystem and can be found with both Hynix and Samsung VRAM, then the next logical place to look is the memory controller. That being said, with some of the cards going into "partial failure" mode where they can operate with limited GPU clocks, I have to wonder if the problem is the memory subsystem at all.

Either that, or we are seeing failures on multiple levels. That will make diagnosis all the more difficult.
What? How is it an afterthought? They allegedly overruled the former head of the graphics division to focus on Navi development at the behest of one of their largest partners.

What did some of you expect them to do? 12nm doesn't offer much real improvement over 14nm (some but nothing spectacular, it wouldn't change things), and they obviously have other products that they should be prioritizing on 7nm. Its not like they could've fast-tracked 7nm more, as Apple likely got the bulk of early 7nm production. They've been saying for years that Navi was designed for 7nm, so trying to port it to 12nm would've been stupid.

Plus there's simple costs, if you think they're going to lead production on a new process with a new design, on a chip that tends to not be high margin for them and doesn't offer the outright numbers of other markets, I don't know what to say.

The most baffling part is that you guys ignore that the issues Nvidia is having are a perfect example of why AMD is smart to have stayed course. Backporting Navi to 12nm would likely be a stupendous blunder, and an updated Vega would likely only have them competing better with the 1070 and 1080, and that's if Vega isn't fundamentally flawed in design for gaming, or they didn't botch it somehow. And even then they'd likely have made it look poor like they did with the 590. It'd already be using more power due to GDDR vs HBM (unless they really want to compete with RTX on price while offering likely worse performance in traditional rendering and also not having any of the features Nvidia is selling people on RTX for), so a 12nm Vega likely would be sucking down 300W just so they could go "look we compete with stock 1080Ti!, at 1/3 more power.

I get it, its a bummer that the graphics market is stagnating, but let's not get too absurd.

I'd be curious how the Quadro cards are doing. I think that's actually a much more important market (and Vega I believe is actually more competitive there than in consumer gaming). If Quadro is having issues too, that could spell trouble for Nvidia, as that might mean companies start looking at how much they're tied to Nvidia over CUDA.
 
Apr 27, 2000
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#70
What? How is it an afterthought? They allegedly overruled the former head of the graphics division to focus on Navi development at the behest of one of their largest partners.
I don't blame that partner, if it's true. AMD is doing a poor job servicing the consumer market. If the consumer market weren't an afterthought, there would be a cut-down 7nm Vega hitting the shelves now or in early 2019. There isn't. AMD went all-in on AI/deep learning.

When the only choice on the market are suicidal NV cards that cost $1200, it's hard not to be disappointed.

They've been saying for years that Navi was designed for 7nm, so trying to port it to 12nm would've been stupid.
Of course that would be stupid. Whoever suggested that? I'd rather see a 12nm Vega refresh than 12nm Navi.

Plus there's simple costs, if you think they're going to lead production on a new process with a new design, on a chip that tends to not be high margin for them and doesn't offer the outright numbers of other markets, I don't know what to say.
"tends not to be high margin" compared to what? If you said "pro cards we can sell in bulk to AI researchers" then you win a cookie. And that's why AMD didn't bother using a consumer card as their 7nm pipecleaner for the GPU market. It still sucks for us, and we're allowed to be upset about it.

The most baffling part is that you guys ignore that the issues Nvidia is having are a perfect example of why AMD is smart to have stayed course.
I see no reason why Nvidia's mysterious problems with Turing have anything to do with RTG. If we see similar problems with Navi then maybe you will be on to something.

I'd be curious how the Quadro cards are doing.
As would I. That's where NV gets its meat and potatoes.
 

Mopetar

Diamond Member
Jan 31, 2011
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#71
I don't blame that partner, if it's true. AMD is doing a poor job servicing the consumer market. If the consumer market weren't an afterthought, there would be a cut-down 7nm Vega hitting the shelves now or in early 2019. There isn't. AMD went all-in on AI/deep learning.
They don't even have their consumer 7nm CPU out and may not until mid 2019. The supply for 7 nm wafers is limited and AMD has multiple product lines. It makes no sense for them to rush out a consumer GPU that they could only sell for $$$ as opposed to making professional or enterprise cards that they can sell for $$$$.

The midrange where AMD is competing has also been a mess for almost the last two years due to the mining boom. It's pretty hard to ask companies to plan around that, because there was no guarantee that all of those gaming cards wouldn't just end up in mining rigs. Not much point in building consumer products that consumers won't actually get due to inflated prices. Worse yet if they play it wrong they get stuck with a lot of extra cards if they overproduce, which has been alleged to have happened to NVidia with the 1060.
 

Stuka87

Diamond Member
Dec 10, 2010
3,992
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#72
IMO this is caused by a faulty memory VRM in the FE PCB. No reported issues with AIB cards using a custom PCBs so the GDDR6 chips themselves are probably not to blame. FE PCB could be sending voltage spikes to the vram causing damage over time.
There have been AIB cards failing as well.
 
Apr 27, 2000
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#74
They don't even have their consumer 7nm CPU out and may not until mid 2019. The supply for 7 nm wafers is limited and AMD has multiple product lines. It makes no sense for them to rush out a consumer GPU that they could only sell for $$$ as opposed to making professional or enterprise cards that they can sell for $$$$.

The midrange where AMD is competing has also been a mess for almost the last two years due to the mining boom. It's pretty hard to ask companies to plan around that, because there was no guarantee that all of those gaming cards wouldn't just end up in mining rigs. Not much point in building consumer products that consumers won't actually get due to inflated prices. Worse yet if they play it wrong they get stuck with a lot of extra cards if they overproduce, which has been alleged to have happened to NVidia with the 1060.
In the end, it really comes down to: what kind of company does AMD want to be? Are they about the pro market first, or vice versa? They have answered that question, at least as far as it concerns RTG.

To tie this in to the main topic, as result we now get to watch the train wreck that is Turing play out in public, with no real alternative on the market. Want a next-gen video card? Good luck, yours may go tits-up. We don't even have a handle on exactly what is causing the problem (I see the "GPU on fire lulz" thing as being an outlier . . . I hope). What is anyone else doing to alleviate the problem? Nothing! Maybe Raja will come to the rescue with new, awesome Intel dGPUs in 2020 or whenever. Which in Intel lingo probably means 2025.

Even NV haters can't want something like this fiasco (outside of the cruel and insane). The dGPU buyer is being fed scraps. It's like we're becoming those poor, sad people slumming around in the garbage pits of Battle Angel/Gunm, looking for useful tech. We get to play with old stuff, or new broken crap. Those magical people in the sky get all the good tech . . .
 

Mopetar

Diamond Member
Jan 31, 2011
4,390
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#75
It's only the high-end enthusiast part of the market that's really affected by this in any way, and that's a tiny majority. The 2070 has a price just barely below what the 980 Ti cost a little over 3 years ago.

Right now, most consumers are happy that they can buy mid-range cards without having to compete with the miners who were driving the prices up.

It still seems like no one is quite sure exactly what the issue is with these cards, but at least NVidia will be able to get it sorted out before the 2060 and 2050 line go on sale.
 

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