Cyclists..... Omg!

Sea Moose

Diamond Member
May 12, 2009
6,936
7
76
...... I am thinking of becoming one! D:

So i either need advice on bikes or i need an exorcism.

But yeah, i need to get fit and i thought that becoming a bike person might be an option.
 

sivart

Golden Member
Oct 20, 2000
1,786
0
0
make sure you ride on 2 lane road that have no shoulder and are super busy...on the wrong side of the road, too...that way no fault of mine when I run you over ;)
 

lifeobry

Golden Member
Oct 24, 2008
1,326
0
0
...... I am thinking of becoming one! D:

Is it the allure of wearing seizure inducing jerseys and too-tight black shorty short shorts?

Or the gear-lust for carbon fibre-laden contraptions with oodles of specifications to pore through?
 

JulesMaximus

No Lifer
Jul 3, 2003
74,459
854
126
I'm going to be one of the few supporting you here posting in a sea of idiots who hate cyclists.

Check out www.bikeforums.net it's one of the best sites for cyclists and if you need any tips or advice drop me a PM.

Welcome!
 

Sea Moose

Diamond Member
May 12, 2009
6,936
7
76
make sure you ride on 2 lane road that have no shoulder and are super busy...on the wrong side of the road, too...that way no fault of mine when I run you over ;)

yea, i shall ride in the middle of a narrow street, just to ensure that traffic is block, even though the foot path has a "bikes allowed" sign. That, and i like the idea that my junk shall be visible with only a thin layer of Lycra blocking it from motorists view.

The path down the dark side begins.........
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
67,347
12,102
126
www.anyf.ca
Wow I just remembered it's been like 2 years since I've been on my bike. It's actually still in my parent's shed. I need to dust it off one day and go for a ride. I should put studded tires on it so I can ride in winter, our summers have been non stop rain and the good trails are usually 4 feet under. Probably why I have not touched it.
 

olds

Elite Member
Mar 3, 2000
50,054
712
126
make sure you ride on 2 lane road that have no shoulder and are super busy...on the wrong side of the road, too...that way no fault of mine when I run you over ;)
Don't forget the gay, too tight, circus clown looking clothing.
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,924
45
91
what is fixed gear?

Most bikes have a freewheel, so when you stop pedaling the bike keeps going. A fixed gear bike doesn't have a freewheel, so when the back wheel is turning the pedals are turning.

You don't want to get a fixed gear bike.
 

Mo0o

Lifer
Jul 31, 2001
24,227
3
76
Most bikes have a freewheel, so when you stop pedaling the bike keeps going. A fixed gear bike doesn't have a freewheel, so when the back wheel is turning the pedals are turning.

You don't want to get a fixed gear bike.

What's the advantage of a fixed wheel bike
 

dawp

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
11,345
2,705
136
plus most if not all fixed gear are single speed, not the greatest for hilly terrain.
 

arrfep

Platinum Member
Sep 7, 2006
2,318
16
81
What's the advantage of a fixed wheel bike

Chubby pale girls with boy haircuts and skinny pale boys with girl haircuts all wearing jeans 2 sizes too small will think you're cool.
 

alevasseur14

Golden Member
Feb 12, 2005
1,760
1
0
and if you're a hipster doofus you'll call it a fixie

Most bikes have a freewheel, so when you stop pedaling the bike keeps going. A fixed gear bike doesn't have a freewheel, so when the back wheel is turning the pedals are turning.

You don't want to get a fixed gear bike.

Stereotypes from those who likely have no experience on one. It's true, the pedals always turn, but that doesn't mean you can't stop. If you buy a complete fixed, it'll come with at least one break from the shop and most are drilled to allow the addition of a rear break. You can also use your legs to lock up the pedals and skid the rear tire. I've kept my front break on so far as a sort of 'OH SHIT' lever. Once you get over the ackwardness of the pedals constantly turning, you forget about it. I've been riding fixed for three years now, year round, even through the MN winters and wouldn't think of going back at this point.

There are definitely pluses to a fixed. They are much lighter because they don't have any shifting mechanisms. In addition to being light, there's basically zero maintenance aside from greasing/replacing the chain (the chain on a fixed will stretch faster than a freewheeled bike due to the additional pressures on the chain), and replacing tires every couple years (again, if you skid stop, you'll go through rear tires faster). I usually replace my chain once a year for the huge sum of 15 bucks or so. I also prefer riding fixed in the Minneapolis winters because I can feel exactly how much traction I've got in my rear wheel and adjust my riding style accordingly.

That said, the riding experience is completely different - in a good way. I know it sounds cheesy but you're way more in touch with the bike. If I'm flying down the road and have to make a sharp turn, I always know exactly where the pedal is going to be in relation to the ground. When coming up to a light, I need to start planning out if I can keep going or if I should start slowing down if it's yellow. If I don't think a car sees me, I can react and slow down or stop. If I'm in traffic, I feel like I'm much more in control. I don't need to jam the breaks if something comes up - I can put a touch of back pressure on the pedals to shave off a little speed if I have to.

I'd recommend at least trying one to see what you think. Give it some time and you just might like it. Like I said, I love mine. If not, to each their own - any bike is a good bike!

I have four other bikes in various configurations. One coaster, one single speed (rain bike), and a 10 speed - I'm not blind to other kinds. I just prefer fixed for the feel and simplicity.

Oh yeah, I don't wear spandex, don't have a racing jersey, and generally try to keep out of the way of cars. I'm also pretty sure you guys wouldn't call me a hipster if you ever met me in person. Pretty normal guy here. I'm not really sure how all bikers got lumped into the Armstrong crowd...
 
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FleshLight

Diamond Member
Mar 18, 2004
6,883
0
71
If you want to cruise around the city/bike path, consider a fixie. If you want to do anything intense, such as climbing or sprinting, you don't want a fixie.
 

ecom

Senior member
Feb 25, 2009
479
0
0
make sure you ride on 2 lane road that have no shoulder and are super busy...on the wrong side of the road, too...that way no fault of mine when I run you over ;)

You forgot to put ignore all traffic control devices.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
48,411
5,270
136
Be prepared to spend, spend spend. I bought a used road bike for $50 and ended up dumping about $430 into it for repairs, upgrades, and equipment. It all adds up - new derailler, chain, handlebar tape, reflectors, helmet, gel gloves, water bottle, etc. etc. etc.

fwiw I've found it REALLY helpful to wear a heartrate monitor (the wireless watch ones for like $30 are fine). I tend to go go go when I get pumping and then get exhausted, and the HRM keeps me in check so I don't burn out too quick. 20-mile rides are cake like that. You can learn to listen to your body too, but I've found having something beep at me is really nice when I'm not thinking about it and just powering up a hill or something.