CPU Core Count Mania. What do you need more cores for?

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What is your most important use case[s] for more CPU cores.

  • Gaming

    Votes: 32 25.0%
  • Video Encoding

    Votes: 38 29.7%
  • 3D rendering

    Votes: 10 7.8%
  • Virtualization (VMware and similar)

    Votes: 31 24.2%
  • HPC and Scientific computing

    Votes: 18 14.1%
  • Other (detail below)

    Votes: 18 14.1%
  • Software Compilation

    Votes: 16 12.5%
  • e-peen

    Votes: 13 10.2%
  • I don't need more cores

    Votes: 17 13.3%

  • Total voters
    128

BigDH01

Golden Member
Jul 8, 2005
1,633
0
91
And while this nice open collaboration is a nice idea, its up against much more than the cost of hardware. The FCC will likely clamp down hard on people trying to setup an open wireless network. Even data scientists are going "WTF?" at the insistence that blockchain is going to solve any of the things it claims it will, and that the decentralized nature has already shown serious problems (and if you think it enhances security then...just wow).
Not just data scientists... I've spent nearly the last decade involved in distributed databases in some way, shape, or form and for the life of me I can't figure out why, right now, everyone is in love with distributed immutable ledgers. Distributed immutable databases have been around a long time and even after decades of research it is REALLY REALLY hard to get it right (just see Jepsen's tests: https://jepsen.io/analyses). Now, because investors don't know any better, everyone wants to solve a CAP problem where not only is P present it is omnipresent. It's like everyone has lost their freaking minds.

At least that's what I thought until I went to a startup meeting in a local incubator. Guy gets up and talks about how blockchain (and his startup) is revolutionizing his industry. His problem is one that is clearly better solved with a traditional database; it would be easier, cheaper, and more performant. Smart guy but clearly spewing bullcrap. I had no idea why he reached the conclusions he did until the end of the meeting when the gentlemen behind me raised his hand and asked if the speaker was taking new investment money as he represented a small group of local investors wanting to get into blockchain. Now I realize I've spent the last 10 years working on the wrong skills, I should master the art of bullcrapping.

edit: removed profanity ;)
 
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Aug 1, 2018
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5
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...Now I realize I've spent the last 10 years working on the wrong skills, I should master the art of bullcrapping.
I think many of us come to that conclusion. Fortunately there are enough of us who like to be able to look in the mirror, to keep things running...
 

whm1974

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2016
7,827
562
96
another discussion when we think average user needs to understand how computer works before using it....

reminds me of the time why unix lost the desktop ....
Because of Linux and the BSDs on cheap and widely available x86 hardware?
 

eek2121

Senior member
Aug 2, 2005
294
6
116
I am speaking about industry knowledge and perspective derived from actually working in this domain.
Why you keep claiming I'm ranting tells me more about you than me.

As for my home, I have a range of enterprise grade hardware and consumer hardware up to the HEDT level linked with consumer/enterprise grade solutions.. which relates to some of the work I do.

I would ask you from what perspective you're speaking from but I already have derived a bit of it.

...going hardware accelerated for years now - The only sound thing stated.

Yes, computing requirements have been shrinking due to hardware acceleration. When there are big bumps in computing at the desktop level, enterprise suffers not flourishes. Cloud computing evolved in a cyclically stagnant period on the desktop and domestic telecom. The future is a quite active desktop computing market, hardware acceleration, and boons in domestic telecom.

Where your perspective lies on this and whether or not you are personally involved and how involved in this domain will determine if you flourish or go bankrupt. To an outsider, such conversation seems like a cook level rant... It's simply beyond your purview and I'm not going to argue endlessly with someone who has no clue what I'm talking about.
You appear to fail to understand the problems that cloud computing solves:

  1. Redundancy - if your 'server farm' went up in flames tomorrow, you would suffer from downtime and potential data loss. I would not.
  2. Scale: my german users get their content locally from a server in Germany.
  3. DDoS protection - Because my platform is distributed, it is very difficult for a malicious user to take down the system.
  4. Cost - building similar infrastructure would cost hundreds of millions every upgrade cycle instead of a couple thousand a month.
While there are valid arguments to be had for both scenarios, your attempt to downplay cloud computing is based on flawed logic.
 

TheGiant

Senior member
Jun 12, 2017
506
138
86
Because of Linux and the BSDs on cheap and widely available x86 hardware?
IMO because the inability to understand that a user is on the first place not the technical excellence behind. Just like with a car. You are driving it without really able to repair or setup yourself. That is pretty much impossible with Unix/Linux style systems.
 

whm1974

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2016
7,827
562
96
IMO because the inability to understand that a user is on the first place not the technical excellence behind. Just like with a car. You are driving it without really able to repair or setup yourself. That is pretty much impossible with Unix/Linux style systems.
If a non-tech user friendly Linux distro is already installed or someone else installs it, then Linux is quit easy for the former type of user to use it, My dad is a prime example of that.
 

TheGiant

Senior member
Jun 12, 2017
506
138
86
If a non-tech user friendly Linux distro is already installed or someone else installs it, then Linux is quit easy for the former type of user to use it, My dad is a prime example of that.
I agree that is now. But at that time when the market decided Windows this wasn't the case.
Imo its the same with using tons of cores for home virtual server for typical users. That's not going to happen. (before I can use my personal cloud, I need to understand how it works a I must be able to set it up).
 
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