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Core i9 9900k Builders Thread

Feb 23, 2011
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#26
You could nitpick air flow issues a bit, but really all these small cases are compromised. I think this case is the best thought out of all of them by a large margin though. We'll see when I start looking at temps. Other things I liked were the ability to use a typical ATX PSU (many were limited to <160mm) and side USB ports (top ones seem like dust catchers to me). Cable routing is excellent on the back side, which is also where the SSD mounts.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
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#27
If your paying a markup on the 9900k i do not think its a good buy.
I would much rather wait for the market to get a bit saturated and the prices to hit retail before you actually purchase, if you can afford to wait.

I do not endorse getting anything until you have seen enough numbers to convince yourself its a good buy.
With PC's buyers remorse is very heavy.... meaning there will always be something where you go

"@#$#@% i should of gotten this instead, or waited on this because now its 20% cheaper".
 
Nov 4, 2012
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#28
Thanks for answering BrandonT.

My AIO is only a 140mm one which was planning on putting in the front alongside a 120mm/140mm intake fan. The define nano S also has 1 120mm intake on the bottom, 1 120mm exhaust on the back and the possibility of 2 140mm/120mm exhausts on top.

Granted is a more spartan/utilitarian design with no tempered glass etc.

This is not a 9xxx series build for me (yet, possibly a 9700k build in the near future), more of a intermediate build to have better thermals and more space to work with now that I crammed a 1080ti in my current node 304 build.
 
Apr 4, 2013
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#29
Man...I built a Coffe Lake system right after I heard Z370 would take the 9th gen chips. My 8700k is comfortably OC'd at 4.8, but not sure my MSI SLI Plus mobo will handle the power needs to OC the 9900k...

I would have bought a more robust mobo had I known what a power hog this chip would be. Really thinking I may just stick with the 8700k for the life of this system.
 

ttechf

Senior member
Jun 11, 2012
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#30
Man...I built a Coffe Lake system right after I heard Z370 would take the 9th gen chips. My 8700k is comfortably OC'd at 4.8, but not sure my MSI SLI Plus mobo will handle the power needs to OC the 9900k...

I would have bought a more robust mobo had I known what a power hog this chip would be. Really thinking I may just stick with the 8700k for the life of this system.
If you already have an i7-8700k NOW, then I would personally ride it out for the life of the system. Not really any reason to upgrade to the i7-9700k or i9-9900k. If you are coming from Haswell Refresh or earlier, then oh yeah, I think one would benefit greatly from the upgrade.

Another reason I wouldn't bother upgrading from an i7-8700k is time is on your side. You already have a fantastic processor and system. So wait for Intel's next offering, skip the continued 14nm process & 9th generation CPUs all together and wait for Intel's new architecture whether that comes in 2019 or 2020. That's my view anyway.
 
Feb 23, 2011
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#31
asendra> yeah that Define Nano S was the other choice. IIRC the top USB and size just edged it out. Watch though where you put the radiator, if top it might interfere with the mobo, if front it might prevent a long video card. Also fans don't necessarily work the same pulling a vacuum as pushing, so I don't know if I would try to supply case air by pulling through a radiator. I could totally be wrong since I don't know what a typical pressure drop is for these, but something to think about. I always like positive pressure and focus on the supply side.
 
Jun 19, 2012
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#32
With regards to pricing, compsource was pretty close to msrp at 515 usd. Compsource includes no retail packing, only OEM packaging.

With regards to Ram 3200mhz is probably sufficient, above 3200mhz you run into the issue of the law of diminishing returns. Plus Intel isn't as dependent on faster Ram as AMD is.
 
Apr 4, 2013
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#33
If you already have an i7-8700k NOW, then I would personally ride it out for the life of the system. Not really any reason to upgrade to the i7-9700k or i9-9900k. If you are coming from Haswell Refresh or earlier, then oh yeah, I think one would benefit greatly from the upgrade.

Another reason I wouldn't bother upgrading from an i7-8700k is time is on your side. You already have a fantastic processor and system. So wait for Intel's next offering, skip the continued 14nm process & 9th generation CPUs all together and wait for Intel's new architecture whether that comes in 2019 or 2020. That's my view anyway.
I have no issue sticking with the 8700k, it runs great. But I built the system with the plan to drop in the 'the beast' and sell off the 6 core. Probably still could, just may not be able to fully overclock the 8c/16t chip. I have workflows that can use the extra threads, plus...I just want it! But not at the expense of possibly needing a different mobo also. I would imagine all Z370 boards could handle the 9900k at stock speeds?
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
17,013
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#34
ompsource includes no retail packing, only OEM packaging
That is by definition NOT a retail cpu, and does not carry the same RETAIL warrenty Intel has.

I would not buy this chip, especially from a store which is not an official intel distributor.
 
Feb 23, 2011
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#35
Looking at my case a bit more, I'm a little concerned. The front 140's only pull through some vents on the side of the front face. Might be an issue. We'll see what happens when I test it. I'm going to start without that 120 on the bottom, then turn it on and see what happens, If it is significant, that might imply the front 140's aren't doing much. There is another version of this case that leaves the VC mounted to the mobo, and so you could put two 120's on the bottom to supply the air, with it exhausting out a front radiator, PSU, and back 120. If you move the radiator to the front you can't use the side for fans at all. Choices, choices...
 

ttechf

Senior member
Jun 11, 2012
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#37
I have no issue sticking with the 8700k, it runs great. But I built the system with the plan to drop in the 'the beast' and sell off the 6 core. Probably still could, just may not be able to fully overclock the 8c/16t chip. I have workflows that can use the extra threads, plus...I just want it! But not at the expense of possibly needing a different mobo also. I would imagine all Z370 boards could handle the 9900k at stock speeds?
At stock speeds? I'd say so. Depends what you mean by stock speed? 3.6Ghz or 4.7Ghz?
Either way, I think you'd be fine.
 
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Feb 23, 2011
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#38
asendra> yeah that Define Nano S was the other choice. IIRC the top USB and size just edged it out. Watch though where you put the radiator, if top it might interfere with the mobo, if front it might prevent a long video card. Also fans don't necessarily work the same pulling a vacuum as pushing, so I don't know if I would try to supply case air by pulling through a radiator. I could totally be wrong since I don't know what a typical pressure drop is for these, but something to think about. I always like positive pressure and focus on the supply side.
Just remembered the other reason I decided against the Define Nano S: the PSU looks like it restricts flow to the vidcard. Looking at my air flow now with the MG Neo MiniG, I'm really going to have to try different fan combos to tease what's going on. I'll keep you guys posted.
 

The Sauce

Diamond Member
Oct 31, 1999
4,709
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#39
The Corsair 275R isn't a bad little case. Can support full ATX but smaller and more efficient than any other case I have owned. Not nearly as cramped as that looks and easily handles my 280mm AIO. Doesnt do 200mm fans like my HAF but easily handles a bunch of 140's.

Just occurred to me that this CPU thread has derailed into a case thread....sorry.
 
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Feb 23, 2011
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#40
I thought it was a builders thread? Seems legit to talk about the case.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
17,013
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#41
Compsource still includes the manufacturer warranty.
I call BS to this.

They are giving you in house warranty which is NOT manufacturers warranty.

Manufacturers warrenty means as it states, that Intel direct honors the warrenty.
If something happens, you file a RMA with Intel, and Intel takes care of you.

Compusource is not listed as an authorized distributor. If something happens you would have to go though them.
Also OEM packaging to me means could of been used in house, or worse off, you will get a Intel Confidential CPU, AKA, an ES chip.

This is a list of authorized distrubtors.
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/partner/where-to-buy/overview.html
If they said Intel will honor warranty on a OEM chip, then i would believe them. But only if they show up on this list.

All the stores get retail cpu's from those vendors above... like newegg, amazon ect...
Another example is when newegg used to sell OEM cpu's.
They would handle the 1yr (OEM)... not 3yr (retail) on there side.
They took the risk in the OEM chip, because IRL intel only gives a a OEM chip 30 days, and the 335 days that follows is handled by the vendor direct.

And trust me, i used to work closely with a intel partner back in the days when i was actively reviewing intel stuff.

Make sure you have it in writting and not from a low level sales, but someone up in management that will vouch you have the full 3 years warranty though INTEL direct, and not though there store.
 
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Zucker2k

Senior member
Feb 15, 2006
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#43
BrandonT, looks a little cramped in there BUT, it does look nice and should be able to cool effectively. I'm still on the fence of getting the i7-9700k, i7-8700k or i9-9900k. I just don't want to purchase the i9-9900k and be in a bad spot thermally. So I am going to wait 2-3 weeks and wait for some more reviews to come out and overclock scenarios. Agian, good stuff though!
From Linus Tech Tips review, the 9900k with HT off is the best gaming chip. Those extra 4MBs of cache the 9900k enjoys over the 9700k really matter in many games. If I was on the fence about which chip to choose for gaming, I would go with the 9900k. Heat won't be an issue if you're gaming, even with HT on. Turning HT off and overclocking the chip to 5.2GHz is going to be a real treat for high end gaming.
 

ttechf

Senior member
Jun 11, 2012
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#44
From Linus Tech Tips review, the 9900k with HT off is the best gaming chip. Those extra 4MBs of cache the 9900k enjoys over the 9700k really matter in many games. If I was on the fence about which chip to choose for gaming, I would go with the 9900k. Heat won't be an issue if you're gaming, even with HT on. Turning HT off and overclocking the chip to 5.2GHz is going to be a real treat for high end gaming.
Hey, thanks for that. I don't really game on my computer much though, lol. In the future I may game with it tops 33% of the time. The other 2 thirds of the time, it's for business and work and everything in between.
 

The Sauce

Diamond Member
Oct 31, 1999
4,709
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#45
Crap! I was all settled in a 9700k and now you have me wondering. Will a 9900k with HT turned off be a better gaming chip??? For just the extra cache I’m guessing not enough to be worth the extra cash.
 

ttechf

Senior member
Jun 11, 2012
336
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#46
Crap! I was all settled in a 9700k and now you have me wondering. Will a 9900k with HT turned off be a better gaming chip??? For just the extra cache I’m guessing not enough to be worth the extra cash.
If gaming is your main priority, I'd get the i7-9700k. It's still a powerhouse of a chip that can easily overclock to 5Ghz to 5.1Ghz on all cores.
 

Zucker2k

Senior member
Feb 15, 2006
678
25
136
#47
Crap! I was all settled in a 9700k and now you have me wondering. Will a 9900k with HT turned off be a better gaming chip??? For just the extra cache I’m guessing not enough to be worth the extra cash.
You can always turn HT back on for that extra performance if you need to.
 

IEC

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
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#49
Considering neither the 9700K nor 9900K is readily available yet, might be best to not jump the gun on buying your other components unless you run across a deal...
 

epsilon84

Senior member
Aug 29, 2010
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#50
Crap! I was all settled in a 9700k and now you have me wondering. Will a 9900k with HT turned off be a better gaming chip??? For just the extra cache I’m guessing not enough to be worth the extra cash.
An extra $150 just for the cache? I'd pass.

I'd only get the 9900K if HT is important for you, or you plan to keep the CPU for many years without upgrading.

It's basically like the 2500K vs 2600K choice people faced in 2011. It took about 4 - 5 years for games to catch up to the point where HT actually mattered.
 

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