Connecting two wired networks via wireless

imported_BigH

Junior Member
May 24, 2004
2
0
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We have two houses on our property and we will soon be getting DSL in one of them. What I want to do is share the DSL (and other data sharing) between the two houses. The houses are about 100 feet apart with a clear view of each other.
What we have planned is to have a wired network in each house, then connect the networks together trough a wireless link. Meaning: House A has a wireless router, from the ethernet ports on the router it connects to two computers. House B has the same setup, a wireless router connecting via a wire to two computer and the DSL modem. The two wireless routers communicate back and forth, linking the two houses and sharing the DSL connection.
Is this even possible? I've been talking to some friends on another forum and they seem to think it is (from what I can understand. I'm just getting into wireless networks).
Here's a picture I made in MSPaint that I posted on the other forum:
Clicky

I was thinking about this router:
D-Link AirPlus Xtreme G series High-Speed 108Mbps 2.4GHz 4-Port Wireless Router, Model DI-624
And my backup choices were:
LINKSYS Wireless G 54Mbps Cable/DSL Router, Model WRT54GS w/ Speed Booster
LINKSYS 54Mbps Access Point, Model WAP54G

What's the difference between an Access Point and a Bridge?

Let me know if any details need further explanation.
Thanks a lot!
Big_H
 

alexXx

Senior member
Jun 4, 2002
502
0
0
i beleive a bridge works the opposite of an access point(correct me if im wrong) the bridge connects a wireless connection to a wired connection and an access point connected a wired connect to a wireless connection
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
29,471
387
126
Welcome to the Network Forum.

It can be done.

1. The two devices that you are going to use have to be put in two facings windows or similar arrangement. Do not expect to signal to travel through walls and 100?.

2. Wireless Cable/DSL Routers do not talk one t o the other they talk to Client card (or an AP that can be configured as a Client.

3. APs in a bridge mode talks one to the other to brodge between two site (basically replacing the Cable), but while in Bridge Mode they do not talk to Wireless Clients. I.e. you can bridge the two sites with APs but you will not have Wireless at each site unless you put an Additional Router/AP in each site. However this is the way the pro go.

4. You can use a Wireless Router in one site and a "Bridge Client card" or an AP thta can be configured as a client in the other site. Doing so you would have Wireless also on the site that uses the Wireless Router.

More here:

Link to: Wireless Network - Configuration Modes.

Link to: Extending the Distance of Entry Level Wireless Network.

Link to: Wireless What Should I Get?

:sun:
 

imported_BigH

Junior Member
May 24, 2004
2
0
0
I've looked through the D-Link site, and I don't hink the DI-624 can act as a bridge. :(
So how about the DWL-G810? That's the same thing only in bridge form (I think).

Now looking at the picture here, it looks like I need one bridge and one router. Is this true? I was assuming I'd need two bridges and zero routers... I guess I'm still a little confused.

So using the above house setup: House B would have the DSL modem, a wireless router (DI-624), and the wired computer network. And House A would have a bridge (DWL-G810), and the wired computer network. Right? Or am I missing something...

Thanks!
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
29,471
387
126
With a little luck it should work.

The G810 is a ""Bridge"" it is not the same as an AP Bridge it is a actualy a Driverless Client card, and thus will work work with a Wireless Router.