Circular Polarizing filters

Rubycon

Madame President
Aug 10, 2005
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Originally posted by: tfinch2
Canon camera with a Nikon filter? You just made fanbois heads explode everywhere.


:thumbsdown: to fanboyisms.

If the shoe fits, wear it damgummit! ;)
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,799
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circular polarizing filters should work in any situation. its the other type of polarizer (drawing blank, kinda tired) that doesn't work with lens that rotate when focusing. or something like that... yea i was absolutely no help to this thread...
 

episodic

Lifer
Feb 7, 2004
11,088
2
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Originally posted by: MS Dawn
Originally posted by: tfinch2
Canon camera with a Nikon filter? You just made fanbois heads explode everywhere.


:thumbsdown: to fanboyisms.

If the shoe fits, wear it damgummit! ;)



I take it that it will work just fine. I figued this nikon would be better than the $3.00 filtres on ebay. . .
 

episodic

Lifer
Feb 7, 2004
11,088
2
81
Originally posted by: destrekor
circular polarizing filters should work in any situation. its the other type of polarizer (drawing blank, kinda tired) that doesn't work with lens that rotate when focusing. or something like that... yea i was absolutely no help to this thread...

I read that if you use an autofocus system, you have to use circular polarizers - there is also a *cheaper* linear polarizer.
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
62,812
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Should work fine. It's awful hard to find better glass than NIkon's...
 

tfinch2

Lifer
Feb 3, 2004
22,114
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For fighting reflections it works great, but saturation can be achieved in post processing. The reason why I ask is that cir polarizers affect metering. With something like a point and shoot and low aperture lenses, this practically forces you to use flash unless you are outside in bright light or like camera shake visible in your images.
 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
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Originally posted by: destrekor
circular polarizing filters should work in any situation. its the other type of polarizer (drawing blank, kinda tired) that doesn't work with lens that rotate when focusing. or something like that... yea i was absolutely no help to this thread...
Any circular polarizer will work just fine.

The other type (linear polarizer) will work on non-AF cameras in most situations (pellicle cameras being one situation where a linear polarizer won't work), and with some cameras the linear polarizer will muck with the metering system. General rule is that a circular polarizer will work on any camera, while a linear polarizer will only work in certain circumstances.

And yes, if you're doing landscape or other outdoor photography a polarizer is a great idea. Especially if you're shooting water. I'd also look into a warming filter, it can give a slightly "richer" look to the picture, more like stock photography.

ZV
 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
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Originally posted by: tfinch2
For fighting reflections it works great, but saturation can be achieved in post processing. The reason why I ask is that cir polarizers affect metering. With something like a point and shoot and low aperture lenses, this practically forces you to use flash unless you are outside in bright light or like camera shake visible in your images.
No... Linear polarizers can affect metering. Circular polarizers don't.

ZV
 

NTB

Diamond Member
Mar 26, 2001
5,179
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Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: destrekor
circular polarizing filters should work in any situation. its the other type of polarizer (drawing blank, kinda tired) that doesn't work with lens that rotate when focusing. or something like that... yea i was absolutely no help to this thread...
Any circular polarizer will work just fine.

The other type (linear polarizer) will work on non-AF cameras in most situations (pellicle cameras being one situation where a linear polarizer won't work), and with some cameras the linear polarizer will muck with the metering system. General rule is that a circular polarizer will work on any camera, while a linear polarizer will only work in certain circumstances.

And yes, if you're doing landscape or other outdoor photography a polarizer is a great idea. Especially if you're shooting water. I'd also look into a warming filter, it can give a slightly "richer" look to the picture, more like stock photography.

ZV


I thought a linear filter would only screw up the focus if the front lens element rotates?

Nate
 

episodic

Lifer
Feb 7, 2004
11,088
2
81
Originally posted by: tfinch2
For fighting reflections it works great, but saturation can be achieved in post processing. The reason why I ask is that cir polarizers affect metering. With something like a point and shoot and low aperture lenses, this practically forces you to use flash unless you are outside in bright light or like camera shake visible in your images.


I only planned to use this outside.
 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
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Originally posted by: NTB
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: destrekor
circular polarizing filters should work in any situation. its the other type of polarizer (drawing blank, kinda tired) that doesn't work with lens that rotate when focusing. or something like that... yea i was absolutely no help to this thread...
Any circular polarizer will work just fine.

The other type (linear polarizer) will work on non-AF cameras in most situations (pellicle cameras being one situation where a linear polarizer won't work), and with some cameras the linear polarizer will muck with the metering system. General rule is that a circular polarizer will work on any camera, while a linear polarizer will only work in certain circumstances.

And yes, if you're doing landscape or other outdoor photography a polarizer is a great idea. Especially if you're shooting water. I'd also look into a warming filter, it can give a slightly "richer" look to the picture, more like stock photography.

ZV
I thought a linear filter would only screw up the focus if the front lens element rotates?

Nate
Depends on the orientation of the filter when it screws on. It will absolutely muck with focusing if it's screwed on the "wrong" way, but may not muck with focus when it is screwed on the other way if the lens doesn't rotate. It all depends on how the polarizer aligns with the sensors. If the barrel rotates, then you're guaranteed to have the polarizer interfere at some point. If the barrel does not rotate, then it may or may not interfere.

ZV
 

tfinch2

Lifer
Feb 3, 2004
22,114
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Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: tfinch2
For fighting reflections it works great, but saturation can be achieved in post processing. The reason why I ask is that cir polarizers affect metering. With something like a point and shoot and low aperture lenses, this practically forces you to use flash unless you are outside in bright light or like camera shake visible in your images.
No... Linear polarizers can affect metering. Circular polarizers don't.

ZV

O RLY? I just slapped my circ onto my E-300. At ISO 100 I metered on the lampshade and got a shutter speed of 1/400. Without the polarizer I metered at 1/1250.
 

NTB

Diamond Member
Mar 26, 2001
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Originally posted by: aphex
I absolutely LOVE my circular polarizer....

I'll go hunt for some of my favorite pictures using it, but heres a quick example of how big of a difference it can make;
http://www.aphexii.com/pics/cp.jpg

Cool :) One of these would have helped when I was camping this weekend. Anybody know a good place to get one?

EDIT: And do brands matter at all? Like, some are good and some are junk?

Nate
 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
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Originally posted by: tfinch2
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: tfinch2
For fighting reflections it works great, but saturation can be achieved in post processing. The reason why I ask is that cir polarizers affect metering. With something like a point and shoot and low aperture lenses, this practically forces you to use flash unless you are outside in bright light or like camera shake visible in your images.
No... Linear polarizers can affect metering. Circular polarizers don't.

ZV
O RLY? I just slapped my circ onto my E-300. At ISO 100 I metered on the lampshade and got a shutter speed of 1/400. Without the polarizer I metered at 1/1250.
Did you take the shot with the filter? If the shot came out, then it's not mucking with metering.

It's essentially putting sunglasses on the lens, of course it's going to take a longer exposure. That doesn't mean it's screwing up the metering. A linear polarizer can be 90 degrees out of phase with the sensors in the camera and you'll meter a bulb shot every time. That's mucking with the metering. What you're seeing is your camera metering correctly based on a reduced amount of light.

ZV

EDIT: To be clear, the metering is not affected. The amount of light transmitted through the lens is, however, reduced. The camera will meter correctly based on the reduced amount of light when a circular polarizer is used. A linear polarizer will cause the camera to meter incorrectly.
 

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
Moderator
Jul 19, 2001
38,572
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Originally posted by: NTB
Originally posted by: aphex
I absolutely LOVE my circular polarizer....

I'll go hunt for some of my favorite pictures using it, but heres a quick example of how big of a difference it can make;
http://www.aphexii.com/pics/cp.jpg

Cool :) One of these would have helped when I was camping this weekend. Anybody know a good place to get one?

EDIT: And do brands matter at all? Like, some are good and some are junk?

Nate


Yes, IMO brand DOES matter... If you go with some cheap ones, you can sometimes see a green tinge to your images, also the polarizing effect seems to be less pronounced.

This image was taken using a Hoya S-HMC Pro 1 on my 18-70 nikkor kit lens;
http://www.aphexii.com/pics/londonsm.jpg - Big Ben


I recently picked up a 72mm B+W Kaasemaan Multi Coated CP and i LOVE IT! Amazing quality.... Lemme find a pic...
 

tfinch2

Lifer
Feb 3, 2004
22,114
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Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: tfinch2
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: tfinch2
For fighting reflections it works great, but saturation can be achieved in post processing. The reason why I ask is that cir polarizers affect metering. With something like a point and shoot and low aperture lenses, this practically forces you to use flash unless you are outside in bright light or like camera shake visible in your images.
No... Linear polarizers can affect metering. Circular polarizers don't.

ZV
O RLY? I just slapped my circ onto my E-300. At ISO 100 I metered on the lampshade and got a shutter speed of 1/400. Without the polarizer I metered at 1/1250.
Did you take the shot with the filter? If the shot came out, then it's not mucking with metering.

It's essentially putting sunglasses on the lens, of course it's going to take a longer exposure. That doesn't mean it's screwing up the metering. A linear polarizer can be 90 degrees out of phase with the sensors in the camera and you'll meter a bulb shot every time. That's mucking with the metering. What you're seeing is your camera metering correctly based on a reduced amount of light.

ZV

I never said it screws up metering. And your point just proved my original statement, metering is affected with a circ polarizer. Shutter speed with need to be slower to achieve the correct exposure. If you are in low-light, this will introduce camera shake, unless you have IS, which the OP does not.
 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
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Originally posted by: tfinch2
Originally posted by: ZenmervoltDid you take the shot with the filter? If the shot came out, then it's not mucking with metering.

It's essentially putting sunglasses on the lens, of course it's going to take a longer exposure. That doesn't mean it's screwing up the metering. A linear polarizer can be 90 degrees out of phase with the sensors in the camera and you'll meter a bulb shot every time. That's mucking with the metering. What you're seeing is your camera metering correctly based on a reduced amount of light.

ZV
I never said it screws up metering. And your point just proved my original statement, metering is affected with a circ polarizer. Shutter speed with need to be slower to achieve the correct exposure. If you are in low-light, this will introduce camera shake, unless you have IS, which the OP does not.
NO! Metering is not affected one iota. "Metering" refers ONLY to the camera's ability to correctly judge the amount of light being transmitted through the lens. In this case, the camera is metering correctly based upon reduced light transmission through the lens.

The amount of light is affected. The camera's ability to meter that amount of light is not affected in the tiniest amount. I expected a much better knowledge of how a camera works from you.

You're quite right that with any polarizer one will need longer shutter times, but the camera's ability to accurately meter the light coming through the lens is only affected by linear polarizers.

ZV
 

episodic

Lifer
Feb 7, 2004
11,088
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I am correct that even without IS - taking photos in bright sunlight will stay above 1/60 sec necessary to minimize handshake - correct?
 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
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Originally posted by: episodic
I am correct that even without IS - taking photos in bright sunlight will stay above 1/60 sec necessary to minimize handshake - correct?
In the instances where you'd want a polarizing filter, yes, you'll be fine. Your camera should be showing you the metered shutter speed anyway so you'll know, but I don't see why you'd be using it on overcast, or dark days.

Also, remember that 1/60 second is the value for a 60mm lens. General rule of thumb is that you want a shutter speed of one over the lens' focal length to avoid shake. So if you're using a 24mm lens for wide angle, you can go down to 1/25 second without shake. I've managed 1/15 sec with a 24mm if I'm really careful.

ZV