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Cheez's Guide on How to Improve Your Hearing to Become Best Audiophile in the World

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cheez

Golden Member
Nov 19, 2010
1,722
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Guys,

I have collected some info on how to improve your hearing based on my experience and some research over the years. Hope you find this helpful.


1). Treat your ears with care - Don't go to place where it is very loud. If your work place is where they make jet engines or work at train station or what not, quit that job. It will damage your hearing and you won't be able to enjoy your sound of music.

2). Rest - Get plenty of rest. Sleep at least 8 hours a day minimum. If you missed an hour, make up that hour of sleeping next day, or by the end of the week. Your body is sensitive and will be affected depending on the number of hours slept over a period of time. If you missed 10 hours of sleep in a month, you need to make that up as soon as you can. This will improve your hearing and you will be able to enjoy listening to the sound of music better. Your ears will detect things better when you upgrade / downgrade your audio system. This way you know you are getting better sound or worse sound. This will also keep your body healthy and also lower chance catching cold as the winter is coming now.

3). Healthy Food - NO SWEETS / Junk Food (sugar from coffee, candybar, ice cream, cake, pie, cookies, biscuits, chocolate, etc). Eating these foods will make you get sick and have a huge impact on health. Your hearing will be lost as your body is not in good working state. This is also a great way to get cancer. Eating processed food (off-the-shelf) should also be avoided. Eat fruits and vegetables. The following are great for your body hence your hearing will be improved. All from produce, not the pre-made / processed off-the-self items:

- Carrots
- Broccoli / Cabbage
- Apples / Pineapples
- Spinach (good for your brain, improves your ear drum to function better too)
- Berries (Strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, cherries, etc)
- Oranges (don't eat limes as they are too sour)
- Pears / plums / peaches / apricots
- Grapes (with seeds, mix all in the blender for maximum health benefit)
- Pomegranites (I choose this because it damn tastes good, and extremely healthy)



4). Exercise - If you exercise your blood will circulate faster and get your organs well fed. Your organs will function better hence you improve hearing. Ear drums have serious impact on this. They need blood to survive. This is highly effective. Say you are listening to music and got a little tired / lousy. Turn off the music and go do some push ups or / and sit ups for 5~ 10 minutes. It doesn't have to be a long exercise. Take a break for a few minutes. Resume the exercise for a few minutes. You then go back to music listening and you will notice you can hear better = more enjoyment for music listening. Your body is stimulated. You don't want to make your body exhausted as that can also have negative impact to hearing. Little bit of exercise is what you are looking for. Make sure your body is fed with proper nutrients (food (fruit / veggy juice), NOT chocolates and ice cream) well before exercising.

5). Coffee - This is somewhat "controversial" as you get mixed response from the doctors / nutritionists / users. It has good things and bad things. Drinking coffee stimulates your mind so you can listen to music better as your brain isn't going to fall asleep. But drinking in moderation with spring water, no sugar, no cream any of that non-sense is good. No more than a teaspoon of coffee should be added into a cup, one-half teaspoon is recommended. You don't need too much of caffeine.

6). Don't touch your Ears - While you are listening to music don't rub your ears or stick your finger and rubbing your ear canals... this *numbs* your ear and lose hearing capability significantly. Don't scratch your ears either. Just don't touch at all. If your ear canals are itching (due to ear wax or bug got inside) while listening to music try to hang tight. No matter what you do.. just don't touch the ears! Once you are done enjoying listening to music you can go clean your ears. Don't do any scratching / rubbing ears at least several hours prior to music listening. It takes time for the numbness to go away which is why you need several hours... What's even worse is when trying to scrap off wax out of your ear canals with your finger nail.... very dangerous to ear drums as they can get damaged / wounded. When that happens your hearing ability will go down to 30%. This happened to me and my ears got numb for 3 days!! I felt crap because I couldn't have eargasm out of my hyper-end audio system. If you have wax issues take proper procedure to clean your canals. Use proper tools such as Q-tips with proper solvent for cleaning. Consult your doctor for details. Don't go ask me what you should use to clean....

Also taking shower can have negative effect to your hearing depending on how much of water got in your ear canals and how you went about removing the moist out of your ears. Remember, you rub that ears and your music listening experience will be ruined. If shower is taken carefully (without touching ears and no water getting inside) it can actually have positive effect to hearing as your body is well soothed from the hot water of bathing... This is a hit and miss. Sometimes I get great hearing after the shower... sometimes totally jacked up I can't enjoy music as my ears got numbed.....

7). Keep the music volume low - Don't listen to music too loud as that also numbs the ear drums, and can hurt them if played too loud. Get used to listening with lower volumes. Start low, increase volume by a notch or two as needed. Once you find the level to be a sweet safe spot, leave it at that. If you set it loud you will not likely be able to enjoy music due to ear numbness and you gonna want to turn it up even more. Bad habit. Especially when you are listening to music with a lot of high frequencies it's a good idea to let your ears to take a break for 10~ 15 minutes. By that I mean turn off the music and go do something else (take a dump, eat, go outside and take out trash, pat / play with your pussy cat, watch TV / videos, etc) and come back to music listening. It recharges your ears to full working state and you will be able to enjoy the high frequency in the music.


Umm... is there anything else to add? Contributions?


Now keep in mind that your mileage will vary. This is because it depends greatly on the audio system you have and what your music source is (recording). If you have crappy system that puts out a lot of edginess (almost distort) you will hear the bad sound more clearly. It won't make your music sound better, it's just that your ears can hear better that's the difference. You may experience ear fatigues... You can also catch details in the music better if you have a good audio system. Use your ears as a monitoring tool for music performance.


thanks,
 
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Alan G

Member
Apr 25, 2013
127
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Aside from the fact that your recommendations seem to be based more on mysticism than sound science, the only thing I can offer is to see a good ENT if you are having hearing issues, you might have a build up of ear wax that needs to be removed.
 

cheez

Golden Member
Nov 19, 2010
1,722
67
91
No touching of ears, that was something I had never considered when listening, so thank you for the information!
You're welcome. This is particularly useful for critical listening.. :)


cheez
 
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LoveMachine

Senior member
May 8, 2012
491
3
81
- Oranges (don't eat limes as they are too sour)


So, you propose that sour foods are harmful to critical, audiophile listening experiences? Does stimulation of certain tastebuds oversensitize the brain, therefore having a deleterious effect on the tympanic membrane? I can't quite tell if your post is meant to mock the audiophile crowd. It's not quite sarcastic enough for that, but a bit too looney to be taken as a serious post.

What are your thoughts on kimchee?
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,742
335
126
- Oranges (don't eat limes as they are too sour)


So, you propose that sour foods are harmful to critical, audiophile listening experiences? Does stimulation of certain tastebuds oversensitize the brain, therefore having a deleterious effect on the tympanic membrane? I can't quite tell if your post is meant to mock the audiophile crowd. It's not quite sarcastic enough for that, but a bit too looney to be taken as a serious post.

What are your thoughts on kimchee?
I haven't figured it out yet either, but I've tried not to think about most of his posts.

No offense OP, but audiophile power cables (to the extremes in your signature) are about the most ridiculous examples of snake-oil I think I have ever encountered.

It's because of those, I can't tell if anything you say is simply unconventional and "extreme" mockery/trolling of the audiophile crowd, or if you are one of the most gullible individuals to fall for placebo and nocebo effects in the AV world.


I mean, according to the science, you might as well bow down to Xenu while you practice these steps - it's all about the same, for naught, that is. Sorry to be harsh, but I see nothing of sound science here.

I'm not self-professed audiophile, but if this is all about trolling/mocking the audiophile crowd - there is plenty of sound science to the true search for better audio (and video) quality.

Beyond an occasional need for some power conditioning, going to extremes with the power cables is something you don't even see in million-dollar-plus, contract-job home theater designs. I think there's a logical reason for that.
 

Mr. Pedantic

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2010
5,040
0
76
I like how (almost) all of you take his post simply at face value with no corroborating evidence whatsoever.
 

Medikit

Senior member
Feb 15, 2006
338
0
76
Cheez are you being serious? Anyways a lot of your recommendations are good for every day life. Here is my commentary (I am board certified in Internal Medicine for what that is worth):

1) Loud noise will degrade your hearing over time by damaging your hair cells. Avoiding loud noises and loud music is solid advice. High pitched noises can be less obvious but are just as damaging. If you can't quit your job then see if it safe and effective to wear hearing protection.

2) Rest: Sleep is massively important. Most of us are not getting enough sleep. I personally have trouble getting the proper amount of sleep. Proper sleep hygiene can help. Avoid caffeine in the afternoon and evening. Minimize distractions in the bedroom (Only for sleep and sex, that means no TV or computer).

3. Healthy eating habits: I cannot argue, but it can be difficult to eat healthy. Preparing food at home instead of eating out at restaurants can help you eat healthier. Avoid buying junk food and snacks. Avoid simple carbohydrates when possible.

4). Exercise - I totally agree here too but it can be hard to exercise regularly once you are working full time. There is evidence that a lower intensity consistent work out may be better than high intensity work outs as you retain the ability to stay active after a lower intensity work out. Consider never taking the elevator up and always using the stairs- I worked on the 15th floor of a building and never used the elevator and this worked quite well for me. If you are getting enough sleep consider waking up earlier for morning exercise. Set realistic goals. Consistency is key.

5). Coffee - There is evidence that moderate coffee intake might be good for you. Avoid it in the afternoon and evening as it may affect your sleep.

6). Don't touch your Ears - If you think you may have excessive earwax then speak with your doctor so they can evaluate and remove the wax. Q-tips may impact your earwax and there is risk of perforating your tympanic membrane. Otherwise I really don't know about touching ones ears or being careful in the shower.

7). Keep the music volume low - see #1
 

Medikit

Senior member
Feb 15, 2006
338
0
76
I like how (almost) all of you take his post simply at face value with no corroborating evidence whatsoever.
I'm not sure if he is a troll or not but most of his advice is actually good for you or benign so I guess I'll just have to support him.
 

Mr. Pedantic

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2010
5,040
0
76
I'm not sure if he is a troll or not but most of his advice is actually good for you or benign so I guess I'll just have to support him.
If you'll notice, the thread title doesn't say "general tips to improved health and wellbeing". It says "How to improve your hearing to become the best audiophile in the world".
 

ImpulsE69

Lifer
Jan 8, 2010
14,794
824
126
Sounds to me like the safest way to be the most awesome-est audiophile is to not be an audiophile.



I also heard that putting your penis in a blender while listening to music is bad for your musical listening enjoyment..but haven't had a chance to test this.
 

Humpy

Diamond Member
Mar 3, 2011
4,464
595
126
I've heard that it is best for improved hearing to masturbate before listening to music. Is this true? It circulates blood to the head and ears, so it seems legit, but I always fall asleep before it's time to flip the record.

TIA
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,742
335
126
I'm not sure if he is a troll or not but most of his advice is actually good for you or benign so I guess I'll just have to support him.
On the concept of health - I can support this thread.
On the concept of improving your hearing - at best, you might improve your audio appreciation.

As one who practices internal medicine, are you aware of an ability to actually improve frequency response across the entire audio spectrum and/or ways to specifically heal previously damaged frequency response ranges, through tips such as the above?

I'll gladly back healthy lifestyle tips - I'm a huge fan and have repeatedly given out my own two cents on the topic... but how this applies to improving your "audiophile ability" leaves me beyond puzzled.

Granted, if tips such as these can actually provide anything other than a placebo effect on actual hearing ability, then with time, experience, and either money or a place to test high-end equipment, one may "grow a better ear" for the subtleties of top audio. Or you may simply have it and that's it - I have no idea about audiophiles "getting better", "teaching themselves", "learning through experience", or if it's just something that's there. An appreciation for audio seems like a must, which is more personal than anything. It's likely only then may one notice "temperatures" of audio (much as there is warm and cold light, as defined by man, there is warm and cold audio - I can explain it for light, I'd fail miserably to describe it in words for audio - audio is far more complex than the color temperature of white light).

Now, what I COULD see in this thread, is the approach to becoming more healthy in order to BE more healthy, in that better physiological health results in improved mood and the feeling of well-being. When you feel good (regularly or in short bursts), you MAY have a finer appreciation for things. It's very possible, but it also still comes down to what interests you. If you like music, being in an incredibly good mood may make it more likely you will appreciate the music more, appreciate the raw sound itself more, perhaps even notice sections of the music, be it a subtle introduce of strings in the background, or noticing a section of the beat you hadn't heard before, etc.

If you care and in a good mood, that MAY (not scientifically tested, at least I am not aware of any research into this) make it more possible to better notice the imaging of the audio - the separate of audio channels. Maybe you didn't notice how left-channel-dominant the bass guitar layer of the track is.

As one who routinely researches the psychological/mental side of physiological health, I'd wage THAT part is very much possible. Whether it can help turn you into an audiophile, who the hell knows. I THOROUGHLY doubt any healing/repair/growth is occurring in your ears, and that any of the above can lend itself to improving actual physical frequency response in your inner ear.
Better focusing on audio appreciation MAY help "re-tune" your nerves, and more likely a more apt description, how well your brain focuses on certain senses/stimuli, as opposed to trying to filter out or ignore certain stimuli.


Another thing - that exercise thing has one point that goes along with the above: feeling good.
Quality exercise is known to induce the release of endorphins (which are, specifically, endogenous opioid peptides, aka the animal body's natural morphine/opium) - and some theorize exercise may also releases anandamide (the endocannabinoid). Not to forget, achieving goals, working through stress (mental/physical), and more... tends to also release dopamine, serotonin, and epinephrine. All of the above contribute to a feeling of well being, to a wonderful natural high. You exercise and get your little good mood high on, you'll probably enjoy/appreciate audio that much more. There's a reason drugs and music go together so well. ;)


My advice - if you want to appreciate the finer qualities of audio, simply focus on being in a good mood and simply LISTENING to music, high quality recordings/bitrates mind you. Don't just play it in the background - no nothing else but listen, and enjoy. Sit back, perhaps close your eyes (it would be an unnecessary stimulus for audio, so try and block it out). Try to not even TOUCH anything - the less stimuli, the more the brain will focus on the stimuli it IS receiving.
It won't improve your hearing, but it may breed that "audio bug."
It may not. Some people just won't ever notice the details. You'd have to WANT to notice them, to the extent that you'd be willing to pay to hear more of them, or to get rid of something you don't like about the audio equipment you already have. That's an investment - and having the desire to make that kind of investment, immediately determines whether or not you'll pay enough attention to audio enough, at that point in time, to "become an audiophile."
 

cheez

Golden Member
Nov 19, 2010
1,722
67
91
- Oranges (don't eat limes as they are too sour)

So, you propose that sour foods are harmful to critical, audiophile listening experiences? Does stimulation of certain tastebuds oversensitize the brain, therefore having a deleterious effect on the tympanic membrane? I can't quite tell if your post is meant to mock the audiophile crowd. It's not quite sarcastic enough for that, but a bit too looney to be taken as a serious post.

What are your thoughts on kimchee?
Limes is optional. It's still good for you. I personally don't like lime due to strong sour taste and can interrupt music listening. At least I would not eat it right before or while listening to music as it causes interruptions to the brain.

As for the Kimchi, it's made of cabbage. Cabbage is in the class of super veggy, almost tie with broccoli in terms of overall benefit. But kimchi has bunch of salt and other bad stuff I don't think it would be all that great.

I haven't figured it out yet either, but I've tried not to think about most of his posts.

No offense OP, but audiophile power cables (to the extremes in your signature) are about the most ridiculous examples of snake-oil I think I have ever encountered.

It's because of those, I can't tell if anything you say is simply unconventional and "extreme" mockery/trolling of the audiophile crowd, or if you are one of the most gullible individuals to fall for placebo and nocebo effects in the AV world.


I mean, according to the science, you might as well bow down to Xenu while you practice these steps - it's all about the same, for naught, that is. Sorry to be harsh, but I see nothing of sound science here.

I'm not self-professed audiophile, but if this is all about trolling/mocking the audiophile crowd - there is plenty of sound science to the true search for better audio (and video) quality.

Beyond an occasional need for some power conditioning, going to extremes with the power cables is something you don't even see in million-dollar-plus, contract-job home theater designs. I think there's a logical reason for that.
I am being serious here and most importantly, honest. Honesty is really a good thing. God likes that. I don't go hide things or pretend something that I am not.

And yes you are trolling, no contribution to the topic as you keep talking / bringing up about hyper cables which is not in the topic. ;)


I've heard that it is best for improved hearing to masturbate before listening to music. Is this true? It circulates blood to the head and ears, so it seems legit, but I always fall asleep before it's time to flip the record.

TIA
I have tried it, but it doesn't seem to help with music listening as I feel lousy. Exercise is better.


cheez
 
Last edited:

cheez

Golden Member
Nov 19, 2010
1,722
67
91
Cheez are you being serious? Anyways a lot of your recommendations are good for every day life. Here is my commentary (I am board certified in Internal Medicine for what that is worth):

1) Loud noise will degrade your hearing over time by damaging your hair cells. Avoiding loud noises and loud music is solid advice. High pitched noises can be less obvious but are just as damaging. If you can't quit your job then see if it safe and effective to wear hearing protection.

2) Rest: Sleep is massively important. Most of us are not getting enough sleep. I personally have trouble getting the proper amount of sleep. Proper sleep hygiene can help. Avoid caffeine in the afternoon and evening. Minimize distractions in the bedroom (Only for sleep and sex, that means no TV or computer).
Good post overall. Thanks for contributing and supporting some of my claims / findings.

I can have coffee right before going to bed. I sleep just fine I don't know why.. I must be an unique person. :D

As for having sex, this wears out your body too. Sleep time only counts when you are actually asleep.

3. Healthy eating habits: I cannot argue, but it can be difficult to eat healthy. Preparing food at home instead of eating out at restaurants can help you eat healthier. Avoid buying junk food and snacks. Avoid simple carbohydrates when possible.
Exactly.... eating at restaurants is very bad, as food is contaminated with full of chemicals they add into it. I and my Mom feel bad whenever we eat at restaurants.

6). Don't touch your Ears - If you think you may have excessive earwax then speak with your doctor so they can evaluate and remove the wax. Q-tips may impact your earwax and there is risk of perforating your tympanic membrane. Otherwise I really don't know about touching ones ears or being careful in the shower.
Ear wax put aside, based on my experience with hearing, touching ears (rubbing, scratching, poking, etc) cause irritation to the skin and it feels like some of my sense in ear drums get *robbed* because of the irritation of the skin that you touched. This has impact on hearing. It's not a permanent damage as my hearing regains once I stop touching my ear for several hours or so. This is really true, not my imagination.

Thanks for your post though, very contributing..


On the concept of health - I can support this thread.
On the concept of improving your hearing - at best, you might improve your audio appreciation.

As one who practices internal medicine, are you aware of an ability to actually improve frequency response across the entire audio spectrum and/or ways to specifically heal previously damaged frequency response ranges, through tips such as the above?

I'll gladly back healthy lifestyle tips - I'm a huge fan and have repeatedly given out my own two cents on the topic... but how this applies to improving your "audiophile ability" leaves me beyond puzzled.

Granted, if tips such as these can actually provide anything other than a placebo effect on actual hearing ability, then with time, experience, and either money or a place to test high-end equipment, one may "grow a better ear" for the subtleties of top audio. Or you may simply have it and that's it - I have no idea about audiophiles "getting better", "teaching themselves", "learning through experience", or if it's just something that's there. An appreciation for audio seems like a must, which is more personal than anything. It's likely only then may one notice "temperatures" of audio (much as there is warm and cold light, as defined by man, there is warm and cold audio - I can explain it for light, I'd fail miserably to describe it in words for audio - audio is far more complex than the color temperature of white light).

Now, what I COULD see in this thread, is the approach to becoming more healthy in order to BE more healthy, in that better physiological health results in improved mood and the feeling of well-being. When you feel good (regularly or in short bursts), you MAY have a finer appreciation for things. It's very possible, but it also still comes down to what interests you. If you like music, being in an incredibly good mood may make it more likely you will appreciate the music more, appreciate the raw sound itself more, perhaps even notice sections of the music, be it a subtle introduce of strings in the background, or noticing a section of the beat you hadn't heard before, etc.

If you care and in a good mood, that MAY (not scientifically tested, at least I am not aware of any research into this) make it more possible to better notice the imaging of the audio - the separate of audio channels. Maybe you didn't notice how left-channel-dominant the bass guitar layer of the track is.

As one who routinely researches the psychological/mental side of physiological health, I'd wage THAT part is very much possible. Whether it can help turn you into an audiophile, who the hell knows. I THOROUGHLY doubt any healing/repair/growth is occurring in your ears, and that any of the above can lend itself to improving actual physical frequency response in your inner ear.
Better focusing on audio appreciation MAY help "re-tune" your nerves, and more likely a more apt description, how well your brain focuses on certain senses/stimuli, as opposed to trying to filter out or ignore certain stimuli.


Another thing - that exercise thing has one point that goes along with the above: feeling good.
Quality exercise is known to induce the release of endorphins (which are, specifically, endogenous opioid peptides, aka the animal body's natural morphine/opium) - and some theorize exercise may also releases anandamide (the endocannabinoid). Not to forget, achieving goals, working through stress (mental/physical), and more... tends to also release dopamine, serotonin, and epinephrine. All of the above contribute to a feeling of well being, to a wonderful natural high. You exercise and get your little good mood high on, you'll probably enjoy/appreciate audio that much more. There's a reason drugs and music go together so well. ;)


My advice - if you want to appreciate the finer qualities of audio, simply focus on being in a good mood and simply LISTENING to music, high quality recordings/bitrates mind you. Don't just play it in the background - no nothing else but listen, and enjoy. Sit back, perhaps close your eyes (it would be an unnecessary stimulus for audio, so try and block it out). Try to not even TOUCH anything - the less stimuli, the more the brain will focus on the stimuli it IS receiving.
It won't improve your hearing, but it may breed that "audio bug."
It may not. Some people just won't ever notice the details. You'd have to WANT to notice them, to the extent that you'd be willing to pay to hear more of them, or to get rid of something you don't like about the audio equipment you already have. That's an investment - and having the desire to make that kind of investment, immediately determines whether or not you'll pay enough attention to audio enough, at that point in time, to "become an audiophile."
Good man... Very, very good post. Give me hug. :) I appreciate you took time and posted something very helpful.


thanks,

cheez
 
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AdamK47

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
13,440
865
126
For the best listening experience you must fast for three days. Water is all that you can have. On the third day you will need someone to tie your hands to your waist, tie your feet together, and blindfold you. After that you are suspended upside down. Two very large 1000W speakers then need to be placed a few inches from your head. The music is then turned on and played at no less than 90% volume level.
 

Mr. Pedantic

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2010
5,040
0
76
For the best listening experience you must fast for three days. Water is all that you can have. On the third day you will need someone to tie your hands to your waist, tie your feet together, and blindfold you. After that you are suspended upside down. Two very large 1000W speakers then need to be placed a few inches from your head. The music is then turned on and played at no less than 90% volume level.
I'm Mr. Pedantic and I endorse this message.
 

Phanuel

Platinum Member
Apr 25, 2008
2,305
2
0
For the best listening experience you must fast for three days. Water is all that you can have. On the third day you will need someone to tie your hands to your waist, tie your feet together, and blindfold you. After that you are suspended upside down. Two very large 1000W speakers then need to be placed a few inches from your head. The music is then turned on and played at no less than 90% volume level.
Do you transcend to experiencing the music after a time having removed your ears from the equation through pure musical bliss?
 

Soundmanred

Lifer
Oct 26, 2006
10,785
4
81
This is possibly the dumbest post I've read this week.
And I've seen a lot of them.
Insane pseudo-science at best, insane person at worst.
 

AdamK47

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
13,440
865
126
Do you transcend to experiencing the music after a time having removed your ears from the equation through pure musical bliss?
After you begin experiencing the music through vibration alone you'll fully learn what it is like to become one with it.
 

Phanuel

Platinum Member
Apr 25, 2008
2,305
2
0
After you begin experiencing the music through vibration alone you'll fully learn what it is like to become one with it.
Does my shattered ear drum open up additional pathways directly into my central nervous system? I can't wait for this penultimate experience!
 

Alan G

Member
Apr 25, 2013
127
0
0
Does my shattered ear drum open up additional pathways directly into my central nervous system? I can't wait for this penultimate experience!
Unfortunately it's worse than that. Your eardrums sever a dual purpose besides converting physical sound pulses to electrical signals, they also keep your brains in your head. Once shattered, you start leaking brain cells and at best have only 24 hours to get things medically repaired to preserve a modicum of sanity.
 

Mr. Pedantic

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2010
5,040
0
76
Unfortunately it's worse than that. Your eardrums sever a dual purpose besides converting physical sound pulses to electrical signals, they also keep your brains in your head. Once shattered, you start leaking brain cells and at best have only 24 hours to get things medically repaired to preserve a modicum of sanity.
To elaborate: what happens is your eardrums protect your brain cells from vibration from sound waves. Without this vital layer of protection, the vibration starts damaging the fragile and vital brain cells, causing cells to literally start to melt and leak away. Some people notice a straw-coloured fluid coming out of their ears or nose, which is brain fluid infused with these damaged cells, but many people don't have this. Contrary to popular myth, people use all their brain cells, and thus even 0.1% loss can lead to irreparable damage. More long-term exposure to sound after eardrum perforation (e.g. hours to days) will almost certainly cause early-onset dementia and worst-case scenario can lead to a syndrome similar to rabies.
 
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