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Cheap gaming rig CPU's

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XavierMace

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2013
4,307
449
126
Gaming, Rendering, Budget. Pick two. :)

Most games don't scale much past 2-4 cores. Adding a second processor doesn't automatically make it twice as fast. Depending on the game it may not make it any faster. Clock speed on the other hand matters for pretty much any game and unless you're on a nearly unlimited budget, you're going to sacrifice clock speed for cores. x5650 vs E3-1620, if you go with the x5650 you're sacrificing 1Ghz of clock speed for 2 cores. You're also losing out on 2 generations of platform improvements. Like USB3.

Depending on what kind of modeling/rendering you're doing, it could be impacted by clock speed, core count, GPU, memory, disk, or all of the above. If you're doing modeling/simulations that are heavily multi-threaded and CPU dependent, then yes a pair of x5650's are going to be faster. But for general usage and 99% of gaming, you're going to be better off with the E3-1620. The other option would be to go with a z620 (or similar) which gives you the option to go dual processors down the road when you can afford it.
 

scannall

Golden Member
Jan 1, 2012
1,827
1,346
136
OK i think i found my one. the Dell Precision T7500, comes with 2x Hexa Core 5650's. 24gb Ram, 1tb HDD's etc. ALl i have to do is stick my 1080 in it... thank's so much!

Have you had any luck overclocking on these processors?
There is only 1 dual socket, X58 board that is overclockable. The EVGA SR2. Very hard to find.
 

BoomSlangx

Member
Feb 16, 2018
41
4
11
Gaming, Rendering, Budget. Pick two. :)

Most games don't scale much past 2-4 cores. Adding a second processor doesn't automatically make it twice as fast. Depending on the game it may not make it any faster. Clock speed on the other hand matters for pretty much any game and unless you're on a nearly unlimited budget, you're going to sacrifice clock speed for cores. x5650 vs E3-1620, if you go with the x5650 you're sacrificing 1Ghz of clock speed for 2 cores. You're also losing out on 2 generations of platform improvements. Like USB3.

Depending on what kind of modeling/rendering you're doing, it could be impacted by clock speed, core count, GPU, memory, disk, or all of the above. If you're doing modeling/simulations that are heavily multi-threaded and CPU dependent, then yes a pair of x5650's are going to be faster. But for general usage and 99% of gaming, you're going to be better off with the E3-1620. The other option would be to go with a z620 (or similar) which gives you the option to go dual processors down the road when you can afford it.
Ah man thats fantastic! the 1620 is my one then!!! can you figure out how big of a case i'll need for a dual CPU 2011 manboard? im a bit confused. will a full size ATX case be big enough for the 2 core motherboard? or will i need a server sized case? thanks again. GREAT info!
 

XavierMace

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2013
4,307
449
126
Most standard form factor dual socket motherboard are EATX. But on your budget, you're much better off buying a surplus prebuilt. I've always been happy with HP's workstations, but @cbn could give you more info.
 

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