CA State Law question

BaboonGuy

Diamond Member
Aug 24, 2002
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Somebody told me that if you pay to live somewhere such as a room that the owner must give you 24 hrs notice before entering your room. I ask because I am in a situation regarding on-campus public safety entering my room while I was sleeping. They did not give me any 24 hrs notice. Is what they did illegal?
 

Wreckem

Diamond Member
Sep 23, 2006
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Originally posted by: BaboonGuy
Somebody told me that if you pay to live somewhere such as a room that the owner must give you 24 hrs notice before entering your room. I ask because I am in a situation regarding on-campus public safety entering my room while I was sleeping. They did not give me any 24 hrs notice. Is what they did illegal?
Likely not because most Universities make you sign away that right. I'd say check your housing contract.
 

Lazy8s

Golden Member
Jun 23, 2004
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Yeah they can generally do what they want when you live on campus. This would be a question for your RA possibly but read the contract.
 

BaboonGuy

Diamond Member
Aug 24, 2002
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Originally posted by: Wreckem
Originally posted by: BaboonGuy
Somebody told me that if you pay to live somewhere such as a room that the owner must give you 24 hrs notice before entering your room. I ask because I am in a situation regarding on-campus public safety entering my room while I was sleeping. They did not give me any 24 hrs notice. Is what they did illegal?
Likely not because most Universities make you sign away that right. I'd say check your housing contract.
You're right, that's not going to be a valid argument for me. However, do you know if this law exists? What is it exactly? I would like to know to verify the credibility of my source.
 

JSFLY

Golden Member
Mar 24, 2006
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Change the locks and post a GTFO sign on your door when ur sleeping.

or

Post a video of yourself saying naughty things while sleeping and put it up on the internet, blame campus safety and sue the pants off the university.

or

Pretend to be asleep, when campus safety enters your room, SCREAM REALLLLLY REALLLY LOUD AND YELL OUT BURLGER!!!!!!!



 

Wreckem

Diamond Member
Sep 23, 2006
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California Civil Code Section 1954

In cases of emergency or tenant abandonment or surrender, a landlord or manager may enter a rental unit without notice. Otherwise, a landlord may enter a unit only after giving reasonable written notice for a valid reason. A valid reason would be to make a needed or agreed upon repair or alteration; to show the unit to prospective buyers, tenants, contractors, lenders or repair workers; to provide agreed upon services; to conduct an inspection related to a tenant's security deposit, prior to their move-out; or pursuant to a court order. A landlord may NOT enter a rental unit simply to inspect, even if the rental agreement allows for it.

Noticed entry should be during normal business hours, unless the tenant consents. The right of entry shall not be abused by the landlord or used to harass a tenant. Reasonable notice has been deemed by the courts to be 24-hour notice. The notice should be personally delivered, left with someone at the premises of suitable age and discretion, or left at, near or under the usual entry door where it is likely to be discovered. It can be mailed, but the landlord should allow 6 days between mailing and entry. There is an exception that allows oral notice of entry during the sale of a property provided certain procedures are followed
 

BaboonGuy

Diamond Member
Aug 24, 2002
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Originally posted by: Wreckem
California Civil Code Section 1954

In cases of emergency or tenant abandonment or surrender, a landlord or manager may enter a rental unit without notice. Otherwise, a landlord may enter a unit only after giving reasonable written notice for a valid reason. A valid reason would be to make a needed or agreed upon repair or alteration; to show the unit to prospective buyers, tenants, contractors, lenders or repair workers; to provide agreed upon services; to conduct an inspection related to a tenant's security deposit, prior to their move-out; or pursuant to a court order. A landlord may NOT enter a rental unit simply to inspect, even if the rental agreement allows for it.
Does this mean that there is hope for me? The public safety on campus entered my room because of a hot tip.
 

BaboonGuy

Diamond Member
Aug 24, 2002
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Originally posted by: BaboonGuy
Originally posted by: Wreckem
California Civil Code Section 1954

In cases of emergency or tenant abandonment or surrender, a landlord or manager may enter a rental unit without notice. Otherwise, a landlord may enter a unit only after giving reasonable written notice for a valid reason. A valid reason would be to make a needed or agreed upon repair or alteration; to show the unit to prospective buyers, tenants, contractors, lenders or repair workers; to provide agreed upon services; to conduct an inspection related to a tenant's security deposit, prior to their move-out; or pursuant to a court order. A landlord may NOT enter a rental unit simply to inspect, even if the rental agreement allows for it.
Does this mean that there is hope for me? The public safety on campus entered my room because of a hot tip.
Hmmm just found this info about our the pub safety:

The department employs a Captain / Manager of Public Safety, a California state licensed investigator, an office manager, and four Lieutenants who serve as patrol watch commanders / shift supervisors.

I guess the CA state licensed thing validates their actions. F.
 

Wreckem

Diamond Member
Sep 23, 2006
9,409
924
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Originally posted by: BaboonGuy
Originally posted by: BaboonGuy
Originally posted by: Wreckem
California Civil Code Section 1954

In cases of emergency or tenant abandonment or surrender, a landlord or manager may enter a rental unit without notice. Otherwise, a landlord may enter a unit only after giving reasonable written notice for a valid reason. A valid reason would be to make a needed or agreed upon repair or alteration; to show the unit to prospective buyers, tenants, contractors, lenders or repair workers; to provide agreed upon services; to conduct an inspection related to a tenant's security deposit, prior to their move-out; or pursuant to a court order. A landlord may NOT enter a rental unit simply to inspect, even if the rental agreement allows for it.
Does this mean that there is hope for me? The public safety on campus entered my room because of a hot tip.
Hmmm just found this info about our the pub safety:

The department employs a Captain / Manager of Public Safety, a California state licensed investigator, an office manager, and four Lieutenants who serve as patrol watch commanders / shift supervisors.

I guess the CA state licensed thing validates their actions. F.
I missed the whole Public Safety thing. Thats not a tenant/landlord issue. Thats a legal issue. I'd say technically if they found something, they can't use it against you unless they had a warrant.
 

SpiderWiz

Senior member
Nov 24, 2004
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Ok, I'm nosey. What was the 'hot tip'? What are you doing to bring suspicion on yourself?
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
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Your landlord didn't enter the room, a public safety officer did. That's a different issue entirely.
 

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