body found inside home sold at auction. dead 16 months....

OutHouse

Lifer
Jun 5, 2000
36,413
616
126
umm wtf? so a house gets foreclosed on, goes to auction gets sold and NOBODY ever goes in the house until its sold??

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/new...a/dead-body-found-inside-home-sold-at-auction


FOUNTAIN, Colo. -- A realtor who bought a foreclosed home at an auction found a dead body inside the house.

Fountain police told KRDO-TV that they were called to the home months ago for a welfare check, but couldn't legally go inside without a cause.

Real estate agent Hootan Emami told the Colorado Springs Gazettethat he and his contractor found the woman lying on the bed in the master bedroom, still dressed, even wearing high heels.

Investigators told KKTV that paperwork and calendars in the home led them to believe she may have been dead for 16 months.

Police do not suspect foul play, but her cause of death hasn’t been determined.
 

Eug

Lifer
Mar 11, 2000
23,561
982
126
^^ Probably smelled as good as Surstromming.

Or maybe even better than Surstromming, since after a while, a body will become mummified.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
102,410
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Until it's sold anyone else would be trespassing. The cops could go in for a check if someone reported a foul odor but that's about it.
 

CraKaJaX

Lifer
Dec 26, 2004
11,905
148
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So the buyer gets the house and a bonus dead hooker? Holy shit! Who's bringing the blow to the house warming?
 

NetWareHead

THAT guy
Aug 10, 2002
5,854
154
106
Dont think it smelled if the body had been dead for months. Ever had an animal die in your walls, attic or somewhere else inaccessible? You know it's there BC of the decay smell. But it goes away slowly and after a while it's gone. Can't think a body would smell months later...
 

Miramonti

Lifer
Aug 26, 2000
28,651
99
91
Fountain police told KRDO-TV that they were called to the home months ago for a welfare check, but couldn't legally go inside without a cause.

Seriously?...in the least, whoever called for the welfare check should have been alerted by the police, who could have then gone inside themselves or arranged for family to go inside.
 

Puffnstuff

Lifer
Mar 9, 2005
16,000
4,778
136
Without knowing the circumstances it's hard to say what really happened other than the person was found dead with their clothes on. If she'd been chained to the bed or something really outrageous then it could open the door for other possibilities. Many times when a person loses their spouse they give up on life especially when they become overly depressed. If you've never lost a mate there's no possible way that you can understand what a person in that position is feeling plus you should try to have some compassion for others.
 

OutHouse

Lifer
Jun 5, 2000
36,413
616
126
Seriously?...in the least, whoever called for the welfare check should have been alerted by the police, who could have then gone inside themselves or arranged for family to go inside.

i know, so no missing person investigation? all kinds of fail on this one.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
102,410
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I've never been to a house auction but you're not allowed to look inside the house before bidding on it?
Not in a foreclosure. If the owner doesn't consent (and plenty don't), the house is being bought with only what can be found out from walking by on the street.
 

master_shake_

Diamond Member
May 22, 2012
6,430
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as the new owner are you required to bury it at your cost or can you just put it at the curb on garbage day?
 

Mike64

Platinum Member
Apr 22, 2011
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Not in a foreclosure. If the owner doesn't consent (and plenty don't), the house is being bought with only what can be found out from walking by on the street.
I've never personally or professionally dealt with this situation, but how does that work? I understand why the cops couldn't just wander in without legal cause or a warrant prior to foreclosure, but a sale can't happen until after the mortgage has been formally foreclosed and title to the property formally transferred to the mortgagee (otherwise, all they'd be selling is the mortgage itself with the attached "right to foreclose", not "the property" itself, which they would not in fact own.) Why would the former owner, who no longer has any legal interest in the property, have to consent to anything?
 
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lupi

Lifer
Apr 8, 2001
32,539
260
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Letting people go inside at a foreclosure auction in general would only give opportunity for people to downgrade the house value in the bidders eyes, so why would the seller want that?
 

IronWing

No Lifer
Jul 20, 2001
68,557
26,153
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Letting people go inside at a foreclosure auction in general would only give opportunity for people to downgrade the house value in the bidders eyes, so why would the seller want that?
True, skeletons in the closet and all that.
 
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ElFenix

Elite Member
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Mar 20, 2000
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I've never personally or professionally dealt with this situation, but how does that work? I understand why the cops couldn't just wander in without legal cause or a warrant prior to foreclosure, but a sale can't happen until after the mortgage has been formally foreclosed and title to the property formally transferred to the mortgagee (otherwise, all they'd be selling is the mortgage itself with the attached "right to foreclose", not "the property" itself, which they would not in fact own.) Why would the former owner, who no longer has any legal interest in the property, have to consent to anything?

You've jumped ahead in the process to when after the foreclosure has occurred.

If you hold a mortgage on a property and the owner stops paying, your remedy, pursuant to various procedural requirements, is a foreclosure sale. Afaik foreclosure is by auction in all 50 states. That auction is a sale of the property. Not until that sale happens has the owner lost his interest in the property.

Usually the bank ends up owning the property after that auction because it can credit bid. iow, it's owed $300,000 so can bid $300,000 without any money actually changing hands.

At that point the bank owns the property and can allow onto it whoever it wants.
 
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MartyMcFly3

Lifer
Jan 18, 2003
11,436
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www.youtube.com
Dont think it smelled if the body had been dead for months. Ever had an animal die in your walls, attic or somewhere else inaccessible? You know it's there BC of the decay smell. But it goes away slowly and after a while it's gone. Can't think a body would smell months later...
As someone who encountered a body where the person was dead for at least 9 months, it definitely still smells. It might've been contained in the house until the door opened, but when it opened.... They smelled it.
 

OutHouse

Lifer
Jun 5, 2000
36,413
616
126
I've never personally or professionally dealt with this situation, but how does that work? I understand why the cops couldn't just wander in without legal cause or a warrant prior to foreclosure, but a sale can't happen until after the mortgage has been formally foreclosed and title to the property formally transferred to the mortgagee (otherwise, all they'd be selling is the mortgage itself with the attached "right to foreclose", not "the property" itself, which they would not in fact own.) Why would the former owner, who no longer has any legal interest in the property, have to consent to anything?

now my head hurts....