Basic Math Thread (a.k.a. Macamus Prime is stupid)

Macamus Prime

Diamond Member
Feb 24, 2011
3,108
0
0
I have pricing for item X on the following quantities:
Item X at 1,000 in quantity is $850
Item X at 3,000 in quantity is $1,280
Item X at 5,000 in quantity is $1,725
Item X at 10,000 in quantity is $2,325
Item X at 15,000 in quantity is $2,735

If I want to figure out the cost of item X is at quantities of:
1,300
2,700
4,500
6,500
8,000
12,000
14,300

,... how do I do so?

EDIT: update
 
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gaidensensei

Banned
May 31, 2003
2,851
2
81
From what I interpreted he already knows how much X is but he didn't say what the values were..
Just get the pricing for X at those quantities:
$A @ 1000 units
$B @ 3000 units
$C @ 5000 units
$D @ 10000 units
$E @ 15000 units

multiply $? with your desired quantities.
IE,
$A * 1300
$A * 2700
$B * 4500
etc.
 

artikk

Diamond Member
Dec 24, 2004
4,172
1
71
I would say plot out the given quantities versus pricing, find trendline, then substitute in the desired values for quantities. That's it.
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
25,042
3,395
126
From what I interpreted he already knows how much X is but he didn't say what the values were..
Just get the pricing for X at those quantities:
$A @ 1000 units
$B @ 3000 units
$C @ 5000 units
$D @ 10000 units
$E @ 15000 units

multiply $? with your desired quantities.
IE,
$A * 1300
$A * 2700
$B * 4500
etc.
That is how most bulk things are priced. Take the smallest price that you qualify for and multiply that by the number of items. Exactly like gaidensensei posted.

Because of this, it is often cheaper to buy the minimum of the next higher quanity and throw the rest away (or resell them). But, in order to know that you need to price the quanity you need AND price the amount of the next level. For example 2700 at price A may be more expensive than 3000 at price B and throwing the extra 300 in the trash (or save for later, or resell).
 
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JTsyo

Lifer
Nov 18, 2007
11,717
874
126
I have pricing for item X on the following quantities:
Item X at 1,000 in quantity is $850
Item X at 3,000 in quantity is $1,280
Item X at 5,000 in quantity is $1,725
Item X at 10,000 in quantity is $2,325
Item X at 15,000 in quantity is $2,735

If I want to figure out the cost of item X is at quantities of:
1,300
2,700
4,500
6,500
8,000
12,000
14,300

,... how do I do so?

EDIT: update

They might only sell at the given quantity. If not
1300* 850/1000
2700* 850/1000
4500* 1280/3000
6500* 1725/5000
8000* 1725/5000
12000* 2325/10000
14300* 2325/10000

EDIT: wow that's some savings for bulk. unit price at 1k = .85, at 15k = .182. More than 4X.
 
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dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
25,042
3,395
126
Meh,... running various scenarios (about 100) - because the final order is a moving target.
With your specific numbers and their apparent pricing scheme, it looks like it is almost a universally better idea just to order the minimum next rung up.

For example, ordering 6500 at the 5000 price level is $2242.50. But ordering 10000 is just $2325. I'd much rather have the extra 3500 parts for $82.50 if you have a moving target.
 

AstroManLuca

Lifer
Jun 24, 2004
15,628
5
81
My math is super rusty but I just threw the thing into Excel, made a graph, and added a trendline. The equation it spit back at me was y = -7E-06x^2 + 0.2428x + 627.17 with an R^2 value of 0.9977.

Ends up returning the following values when you plug the quantities in for x:

1300 = $930.98
2700 = $1231.70
4500 = $1578.02
6500 = $1909.62
8000 = $2121.57
12000 = $2532.77
14300 = $2667.78

That said I doubt any vendor uses a polynomial equation to figure out what to charge people. Probably just tiers. Not sure how you'd figure those out except by trial and error.
 

gaidensensei

Banned
May 31, 2003
2,851
2
81
You don't know where the thresholds start and end for the next bulk pricing tier. Like dullard mentioned, just ask the guy for those prices.

It could be from 1-1000 for $.85 cents or 1-2999 for $.85 cents, you don't know where the transition to the next level starts except at the 1/3/5/10/15k you're given. But the obvious is that you're given cheaper pricing once you move up. At 15k units, you're getting 4.66x for the cost of 1k units.

@ 1000 units = $0.8500 per unit
@ 3000 units = $0.4266 per unit
@ 5000 units = $0.3450 per unit
@10000 units = $0.2325 per unit
@15000 units = $0.1823 per unit
 

darkewaffle

Diamond Member
Oct 7, 2005
8,152
1
81
You don't know where the thresholds start and end for the next bulk pricing tier. Like dullard mentioned, just ask the guy for those prices.

It could be from 1-1000 for $.85 cents or 1-2999 for $.85 cents, you don't know where the transition to the next level starts except at the 1/3/5/10/15k you're given. But the obvious is that you're given cheaper pricing once you move up. At 15k units, you're getting 4.66x for the cost of 1k units.

@ 1000 units = $0.8500 per unit
@ 3000 units = $0.4266 per unit
@ 5000 units = $0.3450 per unit
@10000 units = $0.2325 per unit
@15000 units = $0.1823 per unit


That's what struck me, pricing will be more complicated if it works like tax tiers do. If you order 1500 items do you get 1000 items at .85 each and then 500 at .4266 each or 1500 at .4266 each or what? Or even do you get all 1500 at .85 each because you don't reach .4266 until 3000+ units?

It's up to interpretation and there's no definitive answer yet without a bit more definition.
 

Saint Nick

Lifer
Jan 21, 2005
17,722
6
81
Clearly a thinly-veiled troll thread. I predict this thread staying on the first page for the next couple weeks while AT'ers piss and moan about formulas, costs, savings, and orders of operations.
 

OOBradm

Golden Member
May 21, 2001
1,730
1
76
Looks unsolvable to me. Better give up now before you put too much effort into it
 

Macamus Prime

Diamond Member
Feb 24, 2011
3,108
0
0
I got it; thank you poorly scribbled notes by my boss, 4 years ago.

Item X at 1,000 in quantity is $850
Item X at 3,000 in quantity is $1,280

1,300
* $1,280 - $850 = $430 (price difference between 1,000 and 3,000 in quantity)
* $430 / 2,000 (2,000 is the difference in quantity between 1,000 and 3,000) = .215 is the price per unit between 1,000 and 3,000
* 300 X .215 = $64.59. (300 is the amount over the initial 1,000,.. for the desired 1,300 in quantity)
* $850 + $64.59 = $914.59 is the price of 1,300 units of X.
 

AstroManLuca

Lifer
Jun 24, 2004
15,628
5
81
I got it; thank you poorly scribbled notes by my boss, 4 years ago.

Item X at 1,000 in quantity is $850
Item X at 3,000 in quantity is $1,280

1,300
* $1,280 - $850 = $430 (price difference between 1,000 and 3,000 in quantity)
* $430 / 2,000 (2,000 is the difference in quantity between 1,000 and 3,000) = .215 is the price per unit between 1,000 and 3,000
* 300 X .215 = $64.59. (300 is the amount over the initial 1,000,.. for the desired 1,300 in quantity)
* $850 + $64.59 = $914.59 is the price of 1,300 units of X.

That's just one way of solving it, and it uses information that isn't provided in the original problem.
 
Feb 6, 2007
16,432
1
81
That's what struck me, pricing will be more complicated if it works like tax tiers do. If you order 1500 items do you get 1000 items at .85 each and then 500 at .4266 each or 1500 at .4266 each or what? Or even do you get all 1500 at .85 each because you don't reach .4266 until 3000+ units?

It's up to interpretation and there's no definitive answer yet without a bit more definition.
Bulk pricing isn't tiered the same way as taxes; every unit costs a certain amount based on the threshold you buy at. If you bump up a tier, you've lowered the per-unit cost on EVERY unit you're buying, not just the first 3,000 or whatever.
 

Mr. Pedantic

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2010
5,039
0
76
I got it; thank you poorly scribbled notes by my boss, 4 years ago.

Item X at 1,000 in quantity is $850
Item X at 3,000 in quantity is $1,280

1,300
* $1,280 - $850 = $430 (price difference between 1,000 and 3,000 in quantity)
* $430 / 2,000 (2,000 is the difference in quantity between 1,000 and 3,000) = .215 is the price per unit between 1,000 and 3,000
* 300 X .215 = $64.59. (300 is the amount over the initial 1,000,.. for the desired 1,300 in quantity)
* $850 + $64.59 = $914.59 is the price of 1,300 units of X.
I would like to point out that you did not specify whether the pricing was tiered or is a smooth progression. If it is tiered, you do not specify where the tiers begin/end. If it is a smooth progression, then the unit price of 21.5c is wrong.
 

JTsyo

Lifer
Nov 18, 2007
11,717
874
126
I got it; thank you poorly scribbled notes by my boss, 4 years ago.

Item X at 1,000 in quantity is $850
Item X at 3,000 in quantity is $1,280

1,300
* $1,280 - $850 = $430 (price difference between 1,000 and 3,000 in quantity)
* $430 / 2,000 (2,000 is the difference in quantity between 1,000 and 3,000) = .215 is the price per unit between 1,000 and 3,000
* 300 X .215 = $64.59. (300 is the amount over the initial 1,000,.. for the desired 1,300 in quantity)
* $850 + $64.59 = $914.59 is the price of 1,300 units of X.

seems a bit convoluted. But guess it's an interpolation scheme.