• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

Backup the Drive Attached to the Router

justaguy168

Member
Jul 20, 2011
47
0
61
My wife and I wanted to move all our files off our computers to a drive attached to our Linksys WRT 1900 ACS. I bought a 1.5 TB spindle 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal in a stand-alone enclosure connected to the eSATA port of the Linksys. We store all our files on the attached drive. We want to back it up for security. We have a second spindle drive also in an external enclosure which we'd like to use to back it up. If I just connect another drive to the USB port and copy it will be too slow. What is the best way to do this?

My wife has a Windows Laptop and I have single boot Ubuntu 16.04 LTS desktop.
 

Elixer

Lifer
May 7, 2002
10,378
763
126
Remove drives from enclosure and hook them up to the desktop machine, and clone them.

P.S, sure hope you have the security settings correct on that router, so all your files aren't seen by everyone.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bardock

Bardock

Senior member
Mar 12, 2014
346
39
91
I did this router setup and in a week it corrupted my files on the drive. Even though they advertise usb and network capability, it's a tiny chip in the router doing all this and it's not up to snuff. I wouldn't want the backups I rely on to be risked in this way.

I agree with Elixer, sound advice.
 

justaguy168

Member
Jul 20, 2011
47
0
61
Might it be better to go with a Synology NAS instead? I was trying to get away with not having an extra machine but it sounds like this is not a good approach. Alternately I could put together a DIY NAS running Linux. If so, any recommendations on a case that would hold just a 3.5" drive and a small form factor mobo?
 

Elixer

Lifer
May 7, 2002
10,378
763
126
Might it be better to go with a Synology NAS instead? I was trying to get away with not having an extra machine but it sounds like this is not a good approach. Alternately I could put together a DIY NAS running Linux. If so, any recommendations on a case that would hold just a 3.5" drive and a small form factor mobo?
Really depends on how complicated you want to get.
You can homebrew a NAS system with ZFS for example, check here http://www.freenas.org/
Of course, you can just setup a mini system, run SAMBA or whatever, and do it that way.
There are also some tutorials out there on what to buy like... https://blog.brianmoses.net/2016/02/diy-nas-2016-edition.html

If you rather have something ready 'out of the box', then yeah, Synology or Qnap are good.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS