Are cracks legal for personal use?

Page 2 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

SunnyD

Belgian Waffler
Jan 2, 2001
32,666
123
106
www.neftastic.com
Originally posted by: shortylickens
Originally posted by: SunnyD
Originally posted by: shortylickens
Its already been held up in many courts across the country that clicking [OK] is NOT a legally binding contract.
And in many courts it has indeed been ruled legally binding. So you have a 50/50 chance of being screwed then?

Odds are the publisher of the software in question won't care. They got your money in the first place after all. But you can be damned sure that they will implement measures to keep cracks from working... even though viral marketing is better than slinging wads of cash around.
No, more like 90/10, your favor.
PROVIDED YOU FIGHT IT IN COURT!

Which is exactly what the RIAA, MPAA and video game companies dont want you to do. They know if you are willing to spend the cash on a half decent lawyer they probably wont win. They have been relying on fear tactics to get business done.
They ended up not suing the little girl because they didnt want to look like complete assholes, that would have cost them more in the long run.

Sorry, I'm in a bad mood.

/Soapbox.
You're allowed to be in a bad mood and be on your soapbox... just remember, I'm on YOUR side (read my post further up).

My issues aren't with copy protection per say, it's with the EULA's. The fact that all you are purchasing when you purchase a piece of software is the right to use said software is downright ridiculous.
 

Modelworks

Lifer
Feb 22, 2007
16,240
6
76
I always hated software eula's.
There is no other product that you have to buy to find out that it will not work as advertised , that you cannot return for a refund.
 

shortylickens

No Lifer
Jul 15, 2003
82,076
15,900
126
Originally posted by: Modelworks
I always hated software eula's.
There is no other product that you have to buy to find out that it will not work as advertised , that you cannot return for a refund.
Actually when I first got the Retail of XP Pro and it had too many issues, Best Buy took it back with only one question:
"Did you agree to the EULA?"
 

Cluelessoldtimer

Junior Member
Apr 16, 2007
21
0
0
"The crack manipulates the original EXE file, therefore modifying the code, therefore you are breaking the law."

True, but for a game company to successfully sue you (if anyone even tried) they would have to prove that they suffered harm from your actions. How was the company denied profits by my no-cd cracking a game that I legally purchased (and still have the physical cd to prove it)?

 

biostud

Lifer
Feb 27, 2003
16,820
2,559
126
Lets put it this way: if you can show your scratched disc and haven't been spreading any software to your friends I am pretty sure that no company will try to sue you.
 

Oyeve

Lifer
Oct 18, 1999
21,499
571
126
I only use CD cracks for games I own. I just hate having to keep the disc in the drive and loading is much faster. For online you really have no choice but to use the disc as many have already stated you will get kicked off or banned. I think games should give you an option to play without discs if you do a full install and register online or something. This is why I like Steam. I can play all my Steam games without discs. And if I upgrade a HD I can just copy my Steam files to whereever and it just works.
 

nerp

Diamond Member
Dec 31, 2005
9,854
95
91
Originally posted by: Modelworks
I wish game makers would go the way that adobe and national instruments have.
Activation of the software via phone or internet. Once its done you don't have to have the cd anymore and the software doesn't run with buggy protection software.
This is why I love Steam. Buy, download to install, play. Got a new computer? Just login and let the games trickle down. Patch? You'll get it the next time you load steam.

I have no trouble buying games, so Steam works nicely for me.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY