Any electricians here? breaking the third prong off a power cord

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by SAWYER, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. Cogman

    Cogman Lifer

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    Winnar!

    And to the OP, don't do it. There is a good reason for the ground prong.
     
  2. Eli

    Eli Super Moderator<br>Elite Member
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    I do it all the time, but it's not recommended. And as someone said, there are adapters.
     
  3. So

    So Lifer

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    I thought he meant in the device.
     
  4. AyashiKaibutsu

    AyashiKaibutsu Diamond Member

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    Assuming the fuses are functional in his house it shouldn't be that bad.
     
  5. BlahBlahYouToo

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    uhhh, why would he be on the way to a hospital.
     
  6. Skitzer

    Skitzer Diamond Member

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  7. BurnItDwn

    BurnItDwn Lifer

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    I would do some rewiring. Or, in your case, I would call an electrician.
     
  8. edro

    edro Lifer

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    Why when you can ask ATOT for free?

    The very first response eliminated all danger.
     
  9. Matthiasa

    Matthiasa Diamond Member

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    Except there is risk to it. :eek:
     
  10. Jeff7

    Jeff7 Lifer

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    This of course assumes that said lug is grounded, otherwise it won't do anything.

    All of the outlets at my apartment were 2-prong, and they were wired with 2-conductor wire - hot and neutral only. It's an old building.
    My landlord was kind enough to pay for an electrician to wire in some grounded circuits in each room.
     
  11. Rubycon

    Rubycon Madame President

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    The risk depends on your wiring, the device and where it's being used. (water around?)

    If the circuit breaker is a GFCI type then breaking off the ground - while discouraged - will not present a high risk of health threatening shock. If no GFCI is present (most outlets outside of bath, pool, outside, etc. areas do NOT have them) then yes if your device has a fault where the hot wire energizes the chassis and you touch it you can receive a shock. If you touch it with one hand while touching something else that's grounded it could cost you your life!

    As far as ground and neutral being the same - yes they are bonded at the panel. HOWEVER the ground is NOT designed to carry current! That's the job of the neutral. The ground wire will ONLY carry current in the event of a fault from hot to chassis. This current opens the circuit breaker or fuse, disconnecting the circuit and protecting YOU from touching a hot chassis. Believe me you do NOT want to touch a hot chassis - ever! (well unless we're talking about other chassis' - but I'll leave sex out of this! :p)

    Those adapters with the lugs are commonly found in use with the lugs not connected to anything. A simple neon bulb tester can verify if the wallplate screw is grounded by inserting the probe in the hot (right slot with ground prong facing down, left side with ground prong facing up - assuming correct wiring!) slot and the other probe on the screw. If the bulb glows brightly the screw is grounded. Remove the screw while holding the wallplate up (sometimes paint will keep them in place), plug in the adapter, put the screw through the lug and tighten. This way your three wire device is now connected to your mains properly.

    NEVER snap the ground prong off a plug on a power tool! That's just asking to get "the new look". :eek:
     
  12. bruceb

    bruceb Diamond Member

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    I agree, the Neutral and Ground are bonded in the main breaker panel. And a seperate ground wire then runs to the grounding electrode in the ground. But back to the original question. Do not cut off the prong. It is there for your Safety. Have the outlet changed to a properly installed 3 prong grounding receptacle. Easy to do if it is a metal box and wired with BX (armored cable) as that provides the ground. A little more work if Romex as there should be a Bare Wire connected to the Box Shell and also to the Green Screw on the outlet itself. Be sure you put the White Wire on the Silver Screw and Black on the Brass Screw on the outlet.
     
  13. DrPizza

    DrPizza Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
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    Ummm, all of the time, it's for safety. If you get interesting results, it's because something electrical is screwed up.