AMD chip frying

daemonbot

Banned
Dec 13, 2001
7
0
0
I just bought a new computer from the computer show. Earlier today I smelled something funny so I looke around. As it turns out my CPU fried inside the case, emitting a blue smoke with some funky smells. A couple of wires melted.

Now I am sure this has to do with my NTFS settings because I've not configured it yet (since it's a brand-new computer), and so perhaps some hacker online was able to get into my Aol dialup and mess with my kernel and fry my CPU.

So then I called up the computer guy and explained to him what I thought. He giggled a little and then told me I overloaded my system and so I am not eligible for the warranty. That really made me feel stupid when he giggled. But the good thing is, he said he's willing to upgrade it and fix it for me for only $400. I bargained with him till he came down in price to $350. Is this a great deal?

Also, do you think what happened to me is my fault or do you think the computer vendor should refund my money?
 

Viper GTS

Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
38,107
433
136
It most likely was your fault, but not for overloading the system. You probably didn't install the HS properly.

And it had nothing to do with your internet connection BTW.

;)

Viper GTS
 

sohcrates

Diamond Member
Sep 19, 2000
7,949
0
0
ummm....was the system fully built or did you have to put it together?

1) cpu's don't burn up because of hackers

2) if it came as a complete system, and all you did was turn it on, it is NOT your fault

3) if you put it together yourself, sounds like you might have messed up the HSF install.

can you give us system specs?
 

bozo1

Diamond Member
May 21, 2001
6,364
0
0


<< just bought a new computer from the computer show >>


"Computer show" says it all if they are anything like the ones around here. Nothing but a bunch of scams and/or overpriced junk.
 

dszd0g

Golden Member
Jun 14, 2000
1,226
0
0
The tech probably giggled about believing that a cracker did it. Also if a cracker has access to your NTFS filesystem, you already have a problem. If they get past your firewall you probably have a problem if you are running a Microsoft OS (I am not trying to flame here, it's just unfortunate truth).

Sohcrates seems like he has a good list there.

What was the warranty? If they built the system and you did not open it, it is not your fault.

What was the CPU and what kind of HSF (Heat Sink Fan) was on it?

As an asside:

I have had software fry a motherboard. It was around 1992 and I had bought an Elite (that was the brand) motherboard and installed 386Max
(an old DOS memory manager) on it and smoke litteraly started comming from the motherboard. I brought the motherboard back and got a new one. As soon as the system rebooted with 386Max on it the same thing happened. I was shocked, I could have never believed software could fry a motherboard. I brought the computer to the place I bought it (I think it was NCA they were a computer store in the bay area that went out of business a long time ago) and the tech did not believe me. So he grabbed another Elite motherboard off the shelf and did the install himself and reinstalled 386Max. We both watched the third Elite motherboard smoke. The system ran for about a week before I installed 386Max on it, so it was that software in particular.

Some virii modify the BIOS and some have caused damage that way. Most newer BIOSes have a feature to disable writing to them.
It is common knowledge that older monitors can be damaged by running them out of spec. I have heard urban legands of older virii that intentionally changed
the refresh rate to go out of spec to try and damage the monitor. I can't remember the name of them though and have not come across them personally.
 

Duvie

Elite Member
Feb 5, 2001
16,215
0
71
< Now I am sure this has to do with my NTFS settings because I've not configured it yet (since it's a brand-new computer), and so perhaps some hacker online was able to get into my Aol dialup and mess with my kernel and fry my CPU. >

LOL...what a bunch of crap...stick to buying already built computers...

Computer shows are often scams where they sell returned, open box, and other discontinued or obsolete items...

Did you have to install cpu and heatsink yourself? If so it is mostly likely your fault...


< But the good thing is, he said he's willing to upgrade it and fix it for me for only $400. I bargained with him till he came down in price to $350. Is this a great deal? >

Fvck NO!!! unless you burned up an xp 1900+ it shouldn't cost that much to replace the cpu which is all that should have been damaged...even with his install and a retail box with 3 year warranty shouldn't cost this much....He is scamming you...

< So then I called up the computer guy and explained to him what I thought. He giggled a little and then told me I overloaded my system and so I am not eligible for the warranty. >

Another buch of crap...overloading the system would cause the power supply to fail which should have shut down and not caused the cpu to burn up...

At 350 dollars it sounds like he expects to replace mobo, cpu, HSF, andmaybe the power supply...


SOUNDS LIKE A SCAM



 

HappyPuppy

Lifer
Apr 5, 2001
16,997
2
71
If this was a prebuilt system then you are not at fault. Make him fix it/replace it for free or give your money back. Take him to small claims court if you have to, assuming he has an address where he can be contacted.

Slightly OT, but computer shows can be great places to buy components and even prebuilt systems. I say "can be". You should always check out the vendor you are buying from. How long have they been in business. Do they have a B&M store where you can return components, etc. What is their warranty on prebuilt systems. Is it in writing? In other words, a little common sense goes a long way.

I hope Daemonbot comes back and gives us a little more information. Perhaps we can help him, he's obviously a newbie and needs the help of more experienced people before he gets shafted even worse than he has been.
 

daemonbot

Banned
Dec 13, 2001
7
0
0
I bought the computer all put together. I was going to do it myself since I added a sound card to my old computer once in 98'. But then I figure it'd be faster if he did it. I mean, I don't even have any RJ45's at home so how can I even start?
 

daemonbot

Banned
Dec 13, 2001
7
0
0


<< If this was a prebuilt system then you are not at fault. Make him fix it/replace it for free or give your money back. Take him to small claims court if you have to, assuming he has an address where he can be contacted.

Slightly OT, but computer shows can be great places to buy components and even prebuilt systems. I say "can be". You should always check out the vendor you are buying from. How long have they been in business. Do they have a B&M store where you can return components, etc. What is their warranty on prebuilt systems. Is it in writing? In other words, a little common sense goes a long way.

I hope Daemonbot comes back and gives us a little more information. Perhaps we can help him, he's obviously a newbie and needs the help of more experienced people before he gets shafted even worse than he has been.
>>



I bought a Pentium 166 back in 97 at a computer show. Guess what? A couple months later it died. My friend opened it up and told me it was an overclocked Pentium 120 (or 133). I tried to contact the vendor but they had shut down. I was so mad.
 

HappyPuppy

Lifer
Apr 5, 2001
16,997
2
71
Did you get a written warranty? Did you ever open the case after you bought it? Did he burn it in for you before you walked out with it? Does he have a place of business, hopefully not his home or garage? More details of the transaction and everything you did with it since purchase would be helpful. I'm still thinking the builder is responsible.

Edit: What are the specs and how much did you pay for it?
 

daemonbot

Banned
Dec 13, 2001
7
0
0


<< Did you get a written warranty? Did you ever open the case after you bought it? Did he burn it in for you before you walked out with it? Does he have a place of business, hopefully not his home or garage? More details of the transaction and everything you did with it since purchase would be helpful. I'm still thinking the builder is responsible.

Edit: What are the specs and how much did you pay for it?
>>



Yeah maybe he's just giving me the runaround. I will call him and tell him it's his error and that I didn't do anything to harm it.

 

Rahminator

Senior member
Oct 11, 2001
726
0
0


<<

<< If this was a prebuilt system then you are not at fault. Make him fix it/replace it for free or give your money back. Take him to small claims court if you have to, assuming he has an address where he can be contacted.

Slightly OT, but computer shows can be great places to buy components and even prebuilt systems. I say "can be". You should always check out the vendor you are buying from. How long have they been in business. Do they have a B&M store where you can return components, etc. What is their warranty on prebuilt systems. Is it in writing? In other words, a little common sense goes a long way.

I hope Daemonbot comes back and gives us a little more information. Perhaps we can help him, he's obviously a newbie and needs the help of more experienced people before he gets shafted even worse than he has been.
>>



I bought a Pentium 166 back in 97 at a computer show. Guess what? A couple months later it died. My friend opened it up and told me it was an overclocked Pentium 120 (or 133). I tried to contact the vendor but they had shut down. I was so mad.
>>



Primary reason why chips come locked now.
 

RossGr

Diamond Member
Jan 11, 2000
3,383
1
0
LOL, you guys are taking this post seriously.~^

This must be the same guy that wrote the is my son a hacker piece!
 

veryape

Platinum Member
Jun 13, 2000
2,433
0
0
Dude, if you bought the system pre-built and never opened it up then how the hell could you have fried it? You couldn't have. He sold you a pre-configured burnt chip and hoped you would think you did something wrong, and up until now you thought just as he hoped you would. Take it back and threaten to call the cops, even though there is likely nothing that they can do for you it will probably be enough to scare him into giving you your money back. That is, of course if you can ever find him again.
:(
 

Duvie

Elite Member
Feb 5, 2001
16,215
0
71
< I bought the computer all put together. I was going to do it myself since I added a sound card to my old computer once in 98'. But then I figure it'd be faster if he did it. I mean, I don't even have any RJ45's at home so how can I even start?
>

Yeah this is gotta be complete bullsh^t..
 

sandorski

No Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
70,096
5,639
126
LOL, I'm with Ross on this one. NTFS, online hackers, AOL, kernel messing, fried cpu, $400 for upgrade and repair, overloaded system. Hahaha, good one dude! :D :D