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AFTER THE VIRUS... THE ROBOTS!!!

sportage

Diamond Member
Feb 1, 2008
8,899
1,167
126
I wonder how this pandemic, once over, will affect how business operates and how governments operate in the future?
I would guess that business and corporations would want to automate production anywhere and everywhere they can.
Bring on the robots....
Robots do not get sick, and robots never need to go home to self quarantine.
I would guess that after the virus, technology will enter onto a new era, an era of super technology. Where governments, business and corporations seek to develop new ways to automate, new ways in using robotics, and to invent actual robots to replace those weak, unreliable, flesh and blood human employees. You know how corporations work, they always want to eliminate the unknowns. To eliminate the factors which they can not control. Well, that number one factor will soon become elimination of the hourly worker.
Just wait and see....
Many lessons will have been learned after this pandemic is over, however the most important lesson for governments and corporations might be how vulnerable we humans can be. How so dependent our economy and our financial well-being rely on human participation.
The robots are coming. Full automation is coming. A new focus on technology as never seen before is coming. Governments calling on a new era of technology, an era of super technology, or call it ultra-technology. Come five or ten years from now if you see one fast food burger being flipped or being served out of a window by any human, well... you won't. From the top down, or from the bottom up, which ever you prefer... people will become obsolete. Thru technology people will become obsolete. Business will demand it, corporations will empower it, and governments will pay for it. America may lead the way or maybe not, but certainly governments like Japan and China will lead the way and what they do will spread across the world into every nation.

Oh yeah! The robots are a coming.
And humans can sit home while their government mails out $1200 checks each month, or each week, or whatever is deemed necessary. So in the future when the next pandemic hits it won't even matter. Regardless of how many die or need to self quarantine, the economy can continue to breeze along as if nothing has happened.
And Will Robison, that certainly DOES COMPUTE!


DO YOU WANT FRIES WITH THAT?
lifesize-lost-in-space-b-9-robot-2.jpg
 

UNCjigga

Lifer
Dec 12, 2000
22,532
4,702
136
I’ve been seeing a ton of ads for this gizmo in my LinkedIn feed:


Can permanently take the jobs of the office cleaning staff, and won’t catch a virus (well not a coronavirus anyway!)
 

1prophet

Diamond Member
Aug 17, 2005
5,210
456
126
Robots aren't going to replace you, they will become your boss,

and while our Trump/republican hating liberal democrats constantly harp about living wages while pretending to care about unions and the working class, union hating, Democrat supporting Amazon/Bezos shows us the way of the future.


Amazon has repeatedly said in court that it is not responsible for the actions of its contractors, citing agreements that require them, as one puts it, to “defend, indemnify and hold harmless Amazon.” Just last week, an operations manager for Amazon testified in Chicago that it signs such agreements with all its “delivery service partners,” who assume the liability and the responsibility for legal costs. The agreements cover “all loss or damage to personal property or bodily harm including death.”

When Jake* started working at a Florida warehouse, he was surprised by how few supervisors there were: just two or three managing a workforce of more than 300. “Management was completely automated,” he said. One supervisor would walk the floor, laptop in hand, telling workers to speed up when their rate dropped. (Amazon said its system notifies managers to talk to workers about their performance, and that all final decisions on personnel matters, including terminations, are made by supervisors.)


Jake, who asked to use a pseudonym out of fear of retribution, was a “rebinner.” His job was to take an item off a conveyor belt, press a button, place the item in whatever cubby a monitor told him to, press another button, and repeat. He likened it to doing a twisting lunge every 10 seconds, nonstop, though he was encouraged to move even faster by a giant leaderboard, featuring a cartoon sprinting man, that showed the rates of the 10 fastest workers in real time. A manager would sometimes keep up a sports announcer patter over the intercom — “In third place for the first half, we have Bob at 697 units per hour,” Jake recalled. Top performers got an Amazon currency they could redeem for Amazon Echos and company T-shirts. Low performers got fired.


“You’re not stopping,” Jake said. “You are literally not stopping. It’s like leaving your house and just running and not stopping for anything for 10 straight hours, just running.”


After several months, he felt a burning in his back. A supervisor sometimes told him to bend his knees more when lifting. When Jake did this his rate dropped, and another supervisor would tell him to speed up. “You’ve got to be kidding me. Go faster?” he recalled saying. “If I go faster, I’m going to have a heart attack and fall on the floor.” Finally, his back gave out completely. He was diagnosed with two damaged discs and had to go on disability. The rate, he said, was “100 percent” responsible for his injury.


Every Amazon worker I’ve spoken to said it’s the automatically enforced pace of work, rather than the physical difficulty of the work itself, that makes the job so grueling. Any slack is perpetually being optimized out of the system, and with it any opportunity to rest or recover. A worker on the West Coast told me about a new device that shines a spotlight on the item he’s supposed to pick, allowing Amazon to further accelerate the rate and get rid of what the worker described as “micro rests” stolen in the moment it took to look for the next item on the shelf.


People can’t sustain this level of intense work without breaking down. Last year, ProPublica, BuzzFeed, and others published investigations about Amazon delivery drivers careening into vehicles and pedestrians as they attempted to complete their demanding routes, which are algorithmically generated and monitored via an app on drivers’ phones. In November, Reveal analyzed documents from 23 Amazon warehouses and found that almost 10 percent of full-time workers sustained serious injuries in 2018, more than twice the national average for similar work. Multiple Amazon workers have told me that repetitive stress injuries are epidemic but rarely reported. (An Amazon spokesperson said the company takes worker safety seriously, has medical staff on-site, and encourages workers to report all injuries.) Backaches, knee pain, and other symptoms of constant strain are common enough for Amazon to install painkiller vending machines in its warehouses.


The unrelenting stress takes a toll of its own. Jake recalled yelling at co-workers to move faster, only to wonder what had come over him and apologize. By the end of his shift, he would be so drained that he would go straight to sleep in his car in the warehouse parking lot before making the commute home. “A lot of people did that,” he said. “They would just lay back in their car and fall asleep.” A worker in Minnesota said that the job had been algorithmically intensified to the point that it called for rethinking long-standing labor regulations. “The concept of a 40-hour work week was you work eight hours, you sleep eight hours, and you have eight hours for whatever you want to do,” he said. “But [what] if you come home from work and you just go straight to sleep and you sleep for 16 hours, or the day after your work week, the whole day you feel hungover, you can’t focus on things, you just feel like shit, you lose time outside of work because of the aftereffects of work and the stressful, strenuous conditions?”


“We are not robots.”

Workers inevitably burn out, but because each task is minutely dictated by machine, they are easily replaced. Jake estimated he was hired along with 75 people, but that he was the only one remaining when his back finally gave out, and most had been turned over twice. “You’re just a number, they can replace you with anybody off the street in two seconds,” he said. “They don’t need any skills. They don’t need anything. All they have to do is work real fast.”


There are robots of the ostensibly job-stealing variety in Amazon warehouses, but they’re not the kind that worry most workers. In 2014, Amazon started deploying shelf-carrying robots, which automated the job of walking through the warehouse to retrieve goods. The robots were so efficient that more humans were needed in other roles to keep up, Amazon built more facilities, and the company now employs almost three times the number of full-time warehouse workers it did when the robots came online. But the robots did change the nature of the work: rather than walking around the warehouse, workers stood in cages removing items from the shelves the robots brought them. Employees say it is one of the fastest-paced and most grueling roles in the warehouse. Reveal found that injuries were more common in warehouses with the robots, which makes sense because it’s the pace that’s the problem, and the machines that most concern workers are the ones that enforce it.


Last year saw a wave of worker protests at Amazon facilities. Almost all of them were sparked by automated management leaving no space for basic human needs. In California, a worker was automatically fired after she overdrew her quota of unpaid time off by a single hour following a death in her family. (She was rehired after her co-workers submitted a petition.) In Minnesota, workers walked off the job to protest the accelerating rate, which they said was causing injuries and leaving no time for bathroom breaks or religious observance. To satisfy the machine, workers felt they were forced to become machines themselves. Their chant: “We are not robots.”
Ironically one of the worst things about having someone like Trump as president is the constant dumpster fire /train wreck he provides as a useful diversion, just like the specter of future automation provides a diversion for all the human/worker rights abuses and declining wages due to globalization present today,

so many virtue signaling democrat corpocrats can get away with the same old take care of the rich while paying lip service to the middle class role they have embraced as a norm in politics,

but as long as you hate Trump and donate or take care of the rich benefactors you get a free pass.
 

brycejones

Lifer
Oct 18, 2005
19,282
10,094
136
Robots aren't going to replace you, they will become your boss,

and while our Trump/republican hating liberal democrats constantly harp about living wages while pretending to care about unions and the working class, union hating, Democrat supporting Amazon/Bezos shows us the way of the future.







Ironically one of the worst things about having someone like Trump as president is the constant dumpster fire /train wreck he provides as a useful diversion, just like the specter of future automation provides a diversion for all the human/worker rights abuses and declining wages due to globalization present today,

so many virtue signaling democrat corpocrats can get away with the same old take care of the rich while paying lip service to the middle class role they have embraced as a norm in politics,

but as long as you hate Trump and donate or take care of the rich benefactors you get a free pass.
Instead of constant bitching and blaming your solution is?
 

Commodus

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 2004
7,885
4,884
136
Robots aren't going to replace you, they will become your boss,

and while our Trump/republican hating liberal democrats constantly harp about living wages while pretending to care about unions and the working class, union hating, Democrat supporting Amazon/Bezos shows us the way of the future.







Ironically one of the worst things about having someone like Trump as president is the constant dumpster fire /train wreck he provides as a useful diversion, just like the specter of future automation provides a diversion for all the human/worker rights abuses and declining wages due to globalization present today,

so many virtue signaling democrat corpocrats can get away with the same old take care of the rich while paying lip service to the middle class role they have embraced as a norm in politics,

but as long as you hate Trump and donate or take care of the rich benefactors you get a free pass.
Wouldn't be a thread without your "more enlightened than thou" posturing that has no real ideas for how to fix things.

Besides, at least some Democrats are aware of the potential impact of automation and have called for policies to prepare for it (AOC is one). So, if you do want the US to adapt to greater automation, you still have to vote Democrat.
 

brycejones

Lifer
Oct 18, 2005
19,282
10,094
136
Wouldn't be a thread without your "more enlightened than thou" posturing that has no real ideas for how to fix things.

Besides, at least some Democrats are aware of the potential impact of automation and have called for policies to prepare for it (AOC is one). So, if you do want the US to adapt to greater automation, you still have to vote Democrat.
His constant complaints about virtue signaling are more than a little ironic.
 
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pmv

Diamond Member
May 30, 2008
6,975
2,286
136
The Democrats are clearly a coalition, as parties usually are in FPTP voting systems.

I rarely disagree with the factual parts of 1prophet's posts, but I'm puzzled why he only snipes at the liberals, for no clear purpose.
 

Commodus

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 2004
7,885
4,884
136
The Democrats are clearly a coalition, as parties usually are in FPTP voting systems.

I rarely disagree with the factual parts of 1prophet's posts, but I'm puzzled why he only snipes at the liberals, for no clear purpose.
Oh, he does criticize Trump, but the broken record he keeps playing is... well, not so much "both sides" as attacking the Democrats to argue that the entire system is flawed. But he never really has a solution, just lots of complaining, and he ignores the simple reality that the Democrats would at least restore baseline levels of competence and integrity that are desperately needed right now.
 

Jaskalas

Lifer
Jun 23, 2004
29,506
3,008
126
So, if you do want the US to adapt to greater automation, you still have to vote Democrat.
That's the plan.

Republicans have no policy to address any of these issues.
Progressive Democrats generally have policy for it.
Most Democrats are open to reasoning for these polices.

There is no question who we need to vote for to move this country forward.
 

Paratus

Lifer
Jun 4, 2004
14,375
7,164
146
The Democrats are clearly a coalition, as parties usually are in FPTP voting systems.

I rarely disagree with the factual parts of 1prophet's posts, but I'm puzzled why he only snipes at the liberals, for no clear purpose.
Posted this elsewhere but i think it sums it up

https://forums.anandtech.com/threads/trump-doesnt-have-a-plan-to-fight-the-virus-on-purpose-he-puts-the-onus-onto-the-state-governors-to-figure-out-how-to-move-ahead-to-deflect-blame.2579337/post-40130778
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
15,306
3,511
136
That's the plan.

Republicans have no policy to address any of these issues.
Progressive Democrats generally have policy for it.
Most Democrats are open to reasoning for these polices.

There is no question who we need to vote for to move this country forward.
Robot tax to pay for BLW.
 

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