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70% of Iraqi's want U.S. Forces to leave

NoStateofMind

Diamond Member
Oct 14, 2005
9,716
6
76
Seven out of 10 Iraqis want foreign forces to leave: poll

LONDON (AFP) - More than two-thirds of Iraqis believe US-led coalition forces should leave, according to a poll conducted for British television ahead of the fifth anniversary of the Iraq invasion.

The ORB/Channel 4 News survey suggested that 70 percent thought multinational forces should withdraw.

Yet some 40 percent of the 4,000 people surveyed said they wanted the United States to play a bigger role in rebuilding Iraq and 36 percent wanted more British involvement.

Overall, the wide-ranging poll painted a mixed picture of Iraqi attitudes, contrasting their bleak daily existence with a surprisingly positive attitude about the future.

It threw up stark statistics on the human cost of war, which began on March 20, 2003, its effect on infrastructure and daily life, plus the bloody sectarian violence that erupted in the aftermath of the invasion.

A quarter of those surveyed said they had lost a family member to murder. In Baghdad, that figure rose to nearly half (45 percent).

Some 81 percent had suffered power cuts and 43 percent had experienced drinking water shortages. In the last month, more than a quarter (28 percent) had been short of food.
They want us out, we want out, but we are still there. Why? Because its not about the people its about the powerful few and their agenda.

As for the bolded portion, I can see some saying tis the Iraqi's way of wanting their cake and eat it too. Well I would say they deserve our help for destroying their land, ruining their way of life and the killing of innocent civilians.

But it seems people like Dick Cheney have different plans:

Cheney vows to finish job in Iraq

The US will complete its mission in Iraq to ensure the country does not become a base for attacks on Americans, Vice-President Dick Cheney has said.

Mr Cheney is on a visit to Iraq and the Middle East coinciding with the fifth anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq, launched on 20 March, 2003.

His visit comes as a major conference to promote national reconciliation has been thrown into disarray.

The main Sunni Arab bloc and a major Shia group are boycotting the meeting.

Speaking to US troops at Balad air base north of Baghdad, Mr Cheney said the US had "no intention of abandoning our friends or allowing this country of 170,000 sq km to become a staging ground for further attacks against Americans".
Well gee Mr. Cheney, ever think its because of our involvement that Iraq would even be considered a "haven for terrorists"? Disgusting individual you are.

 

jpeyton

Moderator in SFF, Notebooks, Pre-Built/Barebones
Moderator
Aug 23, 2003
25,387
140
116
Thank God there won't be a threat of veto after January on withdrawal bills.

I'm glad the Iraqis are waking up to the fact that we're illegally occupying their nation.
 
Sep 12, 2004
16,852
59
86
Amazing how polls can differ. This poll shows otherwise:

http://www.abcnews.go.com/imag...aqWhereThingsStand.pdf

Indeed, on a basic level, the presence of foreign forces remains unwelcome: Just 26
percent of Iraqis support having U.S. and coalition troops in their country, up a scant 5
points. But this doesn?t mean most favor immediate withdrawal. Well under half, 38
percent, say the United States should leave now, down from a peak 47 percent in August.
One reason is that Iraqis are divided on what might follow U.S. withdrawal; 46 percent
think it would make security better, but the rest say it would make security worse or leave
it as it is now.
Those who think immediate withdrawal would improve security are twice
as likely to support it.

Moreover, despite their antipathy, big majorities see a continued role for the United
States. From two-thirds to 80 percent of Iraqis support future U.S. efforts conducting
security operations against al Qaeda or foreign jihadis in Iraq; providing military training,
weapons and reconstruction aid; and assisting in security vis-à-vis Iran and Turkey. The
most popular of these is a U.S. role confronting al Qaeda.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,086
493
126
Originally posted by: TastesLikeChicken
Amazing how polls can differ. This poll shows otherwise:

http://www.abcnews.go.com/imag...aqWhereThingsStand.pdf

Indeed, on a basic level, the presence of foreign forces remains unwelcome: Just 26
percent of Iraqis support having U.S. and coalition troops in their country, up a scant 5
points. But this doesn?t mean most favor immediate withdrawal. Well under half, 38
percent, say the United States should leave now, down from a peak 47 percent in August.
One reason is that Iraqis are divided on what might follow U.S. withdrawal; 46 percent
think it would make security better, but the rest say it would make security worse or leave
it as it is now.
Those who think immediate withdrawal would improve security are twice
as likely to support it.

Moreover, despite their antipathy, big majorities see a continued role for the United
States. From two-thirds to 80 percent of Iraqis support future U.S. efforts conducting
security operations against al Qaeda or foreign jihadis in Iraq; providing military training,
weapons and reconstruction aid; and assisting in security vis-à-vis Iran and Turkey. The
most popular of these is a U.S. role confronting al Qaeda.

The OPs poll does the same. The OP poll claims 70% wants us to leave right now, then quotes that 40% want us to play a bigger role hehe.


 
Sep 12, 2004
16,852
59
86
Originally posted by: Genx87
Originally posted by: TastesLikeChicken
Amazing how polls can differ. This poll shows otherwise:

http://www.abcnews.go.com/imag...aqWhereThingsStand.pdf

Indeed, on a basic level, the presence of foreign forces remains unwelcome: Just 26
percent of Iraqis support having U.S. and coalition troops in their country, up a scant 5
points. But this doesn?t mean most favor immediate withdrawal. Well under half, 38
percent, say the United States should leave now, down from a peak 47 percent in August.
One reason is that Iraqis are divided on what might follow U.S. withdrawal; 46 percent
think it would make security better, but the rest say it would make security worse or leave
it as it is now.
Those who think immediate withdrawal would improve security are twice
as likely to support it.

Moreover, despite their antipathy, big majorities see a continued role for the United
States. From two-thirds to 80 percent of Iraqis support future U.S. efforts conducting
security operations against al Qaeda or foreign jihadis in Iraq; providing military training,
weapons and reconstruction aid; and assisting in security vis-à-vis Iran and Turkey. The
most popular of these is a U.S. role confronting al Qaeda.

The OPs poll does the same. The OP poll claims 70% wants us to leave right now, then quotes that 40% want us to play a bigger role hehe.
Must be one those "Lies, damned lies, and statistics" thangs. ;)
 

NoStateofMind

Diamond Member
Oct 14, 2005
9,716
6
76
Originally posted by: Genx87
Originally posted by: TastesLikeChicken
Amazing how polls can differ. This poll shows otherwise:

http://www.abcnews.go.com/imag...aqWhereThingsStand.pdf

Indeed, on a basic level, the presence of foreign forces remains unwelcome: Just 26
percent of Iraqis support having U.S. and coalition troops in their country, up a scant 5
points. But this doesn?t mean most favor immediate withdrawal. Well under half, 38
percent, say the United States should leave now, down from a peak 47 percent in August.
One reason is that Iraqis are divided on what might follow U.S. withdrawal; 46 percent
think it would make security better, but the rest say it would make security worse or leave
it as it is now.
Those who think immediate withdrawal would improve security are twice
as likely to support it.

Moreover, despite their antipathy, big majorities see a continued role for the United
States. From two-thirds to 80 percent of Iraqis support future U.S. efforts conducting
security operations against al Qaeda or foreign jihadis in Iraq; providing military training,
weapons and reconstruction aid; and assisting in security vis-à-vis Iran and Turkey. The
most popular of these is a U.S. role confronting al Qaeda.

The OPs poll does the same. The OP poll claims 70% wants us to leave right now, then quotes that 40% want us to play a bigger role in rebuilding Iraq hehe.
Fixed.

You do know the difference right?

 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,086
493
126
Originally posted by: PC Surgeon
Originally posted by: Genx87
Originally posted by: TastesLikeChicken
Amazing how polls can differ. This poll shows otherwise:

http://www.abcnews.go.com/imag...aqWhereThingsStand.pdf

Indeed, on a basic level, the presence of foreign forces remains unwelcome: Just 26
percent of Iraqis support having U.S. and coalition troops in their country, up a scant 5
points. But this doesn?t mean most favor immediate withdrawal. Well under half, 38
percent, say the United States should leave now, down from a peak 47 percent in August.
One reason is that Iraqis are divided on what might follow U.S. withdrawal; 46 percent
think it would make security better, but the rest say it would make security worse or leave
it as it is now.
Those who think immediate withdrawal would improve security are twice
as likely to support it.

Moreover, despite their antipathy, big majorities see a continued role for the United
States. From two-thirds to 80 percent of Iraqis support future U.S. efforts conducting
security operations against al Qaeda or foreign jihadis in Iraq; providing military training,
weapons and reconstruction aid; and assisting in security vis-à-vis Iran and Turkey. The
most popular of these is a U.S. role confronting al Qaeda.

The OPs poll does the same. The OP poll claims 70% wants us to leave right now, then quotes that 40% want us to play a bigger role in rebuilding Iraq hehe.
Fixed.

You do know the difference right?

Lighten up francis
 

palehorse

Lifer
Dec 21, 2005
11,547
0
76
Originally posted by: jpeyton
Thank God there won't be a threat of veto after January on withdrawal bills.

I'm glad the Iraqis are waking up to the fact that we're illegally occupying their nation.
There is nothing "illegal" about our presence in Iraq, no matter how many times you say so... just an FYI...
 

EXman

Lifer
Jul 12, 2001
20,083
15
81
Originally posted by: palehorse74
Originally posted by: jpeyton
Thank God there won't be a threat of veto after January on withdrawal bills.

I'm glad the Iraqis are waking up to the fact that we're illegally occupying their nation.
There is nothing "illegal" about our presence in Iraq, no matter how many times you say so... just an FYI...
Typical ultra lib if you repeat a lie so many times people might believe it.

We've invested too much to up and leave in a moment.


I have a Poll:

The Iraqi People will have one big POLL up their butt if we leave. Genocide maybe not, but Sadr would make a power play and many Sunnis that were shafted will do the same. Turkey will take out the PKK in the north even if it comes to killing everyone there. The Shit would hit the fan. I won't even go on about Iran! whoa.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
71,486
21,469
136
Originally posted by: palehorse74
Originally posted by: jpeyton
Thank God there won't be a threat of veto after January on withdrawal bills.

I'm glad the Iraqis are waking up to the fact that we're illegally occupying their nation.
There is nothing "illegal" about our presence in Iraq, no matter how many times you say so... just an FYI...
3 things for 3 people:

TLC: Those two polls don't necessarily differ at all. Your poll said immediately withdraw, the poll in the OP just said 'withdraw'. Those can mean two very different things. Didn't you just have some posts in other threads about knowing the meaning of these sorts of distinctions?

Palehorse: That's not true. You can debate the relative merits of our invasion/occupation/etc, but chances are pretty good it was illegal under international law. Hell, the secretary general of the UN said it violated the UN charter. Richard Perle, a staunch supporter of the war has said that it was illegal (but still necessary/justified). Yes yes, I know that there are other people who say it's just fine. Anyways, I don't really want to get into a drawn out conversation over this (as I'm fairly sure TLC will but in, go crazy, and ruin it) but to say that there is nothing illegal about our presence in Iraq is overstating the case for our legitimacy pretty substantially.

EXman: Typical ultra lib I'm sure. Stop being an idiot.
 

Fern

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 30, 2003
26,917
173
106
I think it best to take the sentiment of the Iraqi parliment as the proper guage of what they want.

Iraqi parliament votes on US troops

Iraqi politicians have passed a resolution requiring the government to seek parliamentary permission before asking the UN to extend the mandate for US-led forces in Iraq.

The UN mandate for foreign forces in Iraq has already been extended until December 31 at al-Maliki's request, so Tuesday's parliamentary action is not expected to have any immediate effect.

The UN Security Council voted on November 28 to extend the mandate of the multinational force, but it has also authorised a review of that mandate by June 15 or earlier if requested by the Iraqi government.
Seems to me sooner or later it's gonna have to come to a vote.

How odd if at June 15 the UN asks the Iraqi goverment, and they ask Parliment and we are forced to withdrawl. Damn, that would sure change the landscape of the election.

Fern
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
66,835
3,635
126
I think that 99 in a hundred people who quote percentages should be beaten in a public square.
 
Sep 12, 2004
16,852
59
86
Originally posted by: eskimospy
Originally posted by: palehorse74
Originally posted by: jpeyton
Thank God there won't be a threat of veto after January on withdrawal bills.

I'm glad the Iraqis are waking up to the fact that we're illegally occupying their nation.
There is nothing "illegal" about our presence in Iraq, no matter how many times you say so... just an FYI...
3 things for 3 people:

TLC: Those two polls don't necessarily differ at all. Your poll said immediately withdraw, the poll in the OP just said 'withdraw'. Those can mean two very different things. Didn't you just have some posts in other threads about knowing the meaning of these sorts of distinctions?
Maybe you should direct that response to the OP instead of me? He asks:

"They want us out, we want out, but we are still there. Why?"

The OP seems to believe withdraw means immediately. Since I was responding to him and not any disparity on how the questions in the polls were asked, my comment seems just fine, tyvm.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
71,486
21,469
136
Originally posted by: Fern
I think it best to take the sentiment of the Iraqi parliment as the proper guage of what they want.

Iraqi parliament votes on US troops

Iraqi politicians have passed a resolution requiring the government to seek parliamentary permission before asking the UN to extend the mandate for US-led forces in Iraq.

The UN mandate for foreign forces in Iraq has already been extended until December 31 at al-Maliki's request, so Tuesday's parliamentary action is not expected to have any immediate effect.

The UN Security Council voted on November 28 to extend the mandate of the multinational force, but it has also authorised a review of that mandate by June 15 or earlier if requested by the Iraqi government.
Seems to me sooner or later it's gonna have to come to a vote.

How odd if at June 15 the UN asks the Iraqi goverment, and they ask Parliment and we are forced to withdrawl. Damn, that would sure change the landscape of the election.

Fern
Very interesting. I sincerely doubt the parliament would vote for us to leave in June, but if they did it would be pretty bad news for McCain. Then again, if the levels of violence stay low enough... wouldn't it be ironic for McCain's presidential hopes to be so badly damaged by what he would consider 'success' in Iraq?
 

Mxylplyx

Diamond Member
Mar 21, 2007
4,197
100
106
Originally posted by: Genx87
Originally posted by: TastesLikeChicken
Amazing how polls can differ. This poll shows otherwise:

http://www.abcnews.go.com/imag...aqWhereThingsStand.pdf

Indeed, on a basic level, the presence of foreign forces remains unwelcome: Just 26
percent of Iraqis support having U.S. and coalition troops in their country, up a scant 5
points. But this doesn?t mean most favor immediate withdrawal. Well under half, 38
percent, say the United States should leave now, down from a peak 47 percent in August.
One reason is that Iraqis are divided on what might follow U.S. withdrawal; 46 percent
think it would make security better, but the rest say it would make security worse or leave
it as it is now.
Those who think immediate withdrawal would improve security are twice
as likely to support it.

Moreover, despite their antipathy, big majorities see a continued role for the United
States. From two-thirds to 80 percent of Iraqis support future U.S. efforts conducting
security operations against al Qaeda or foreign jihadis in Iraq; providing military training,
weapons and reconstruction aid; and assisting in security vis-à-vis Iran and Turkey. The
most popular of these is a U.S. role confronting al Qaeda.

The OPs poll does the same. The OP poll claims 70% wants us to leave right now, then quotes that 40% want us to play a bigger role hehe.
Personal accounts from several friends who have been over there suggests that Iraqi's arent the sharpest tools in the shed. They probably dont know what the hell they want, or the consequences of what they want.

 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
71,486
21,469
136
Originally posted by: Mxylplyx


Personal accounts from several friends who have been over there suggests that Iraqi's arent the sharpest tools in the shed. They probably dont know what the hell they want, or the consequences of what they want.
Yeah! That's the problem! Iraqis are just stupid!

This post is very informative and well thought out.
 

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