7 years after getting divorced I'm still getting angry collection letters about my ex

bwass24

Golden Member
Apr 12, 2002
1,574
0
0
I've been happily divorced since Nov 18, 1996. After our divorce my ex-wife became a very committed and accomplished avoider of debts. She did things like use MY ADDRESS for her credit applications and generally blow smoke towards me when it came to her debts. From what I know she's since been married and divorced AGAIN, and thankfully I have no idea where she is.

My problem though is that I am continually getting angry collection calls and letters for her. As hard as I try they simply won't leave me alone even though I make it VERY CLEAR to them that a) we've been divorced for over 7 years, b) she has a new name, c) she doesn't now nor has she ever lived at my address and d) I don't know (or care about) her whereabouts.

Any ideas (realistic) on how to get this emotionally painful and unnecessary harassment to stop?:frown:
 

Orsorum

Lifer
Dec 26, 2001
27,631
5
81
Blanket response - This person does not reside at this address. I am sorry for the inconvenience.
 

bwass24

Golden Member
Apr 12, 2002
1,574
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0
The problem with calling a lawyer (which I still might do) is that I refuse to spend one cent that has any connection with my ex-wife. It's a principle.
 

AmerDoux

Senior member
Dec 4, 2001
644
0
71
Unfortunately, the collections companies tend not to believe you.
Get the company name and address of the collector(s). Write a formal letter stating your response. Request them to remove your phone number/address from their system. Best to send the letter Registered.
Document your correspondence with them (written and verbal)
If, after a couple of weeks the harrassment continues, file a complaint with the BBB. Better companies will take the complaint with the BBB seriously. That usually solves the problem. One of the problems is that while you may have notified the crediting company, the collection has gone to another company. You may still get phone calls from the collections folks. Ask the caller for their company name and address. FYI them that you have filed a complaint with the BBB and you will be filing another, for harrassment against the collection company. You may have to do this a couple of times, but it usually stops after two or three more calls.
If it continues, you have every right to file harrassment charges against the crediting and collections companies.

g/l
 

Alchemist99

Golden Member
Oct 15, 2002
1,172
0
0
Maybe give them a new phone number and address to harrass, Like her mother or sister.

or if you can get her new name and phone # give it to them tell them you want to help but thats all the info you have.

good luck

 

MistaTastyCakes

Golden Member
Oct 11, 2001
1,607
0
0
Are they third party debt collection agencies? If so, send them this.

Your Name
Your Address
City, State, Zip

(Sent via CERTIFIED RETURN MAIL #123 456 789 with RETURN RECEIPT)

Date:

XYZ Collection Agency/Law Firm
1234 Main Street, #100
Any town, USA 10021

Re: File #0000000 - ABC Bank - #4445566778899000 -For: $5555.55

Dear Debt Collector /Debt Collector Attorney:


This will serve as your legal notice under provisions of federal law, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), to cease all communication with me in regard to the debt referenced above.
If you fail to heed this notice, I will file a formal complaint against you with the Federal Trade Commission who is responsible for enforcement, the States Attorney General office and/or the American Collectors Association or local State Bar Association.
I/We have decided that we do not desire to work with a collection agency under any circumstances. I/We will contact the original creditor to resolve this matter directly, as circumstances warrant.
You are also notified that should any adverse information be placed against my/our credit reports as a result of this notice that appropriate actions will be taken. Give this very important matter the attention it deserves.

Sincerely,

John J. Consumer


Under the rules of the FDCPA, a third party debt collection agency can NOT contact you if you send them a cease communication letter. The letter basically states that you are only willing to speak to the first part company, and if they do contact or harass you or anyone you know, you have grounds for a complaint to the Federal Trade Commision and a lawsuit.

I work for a debt collection agency, and once we get letters like these, we simply call our clients and cancel the person's account, taking it off of our system and ceasing all letters and calls. I hope this helps.
 

bwass24

Golden Member
Apr 12, 2002
1,574
0
0
Thanks for the letter but that letter implies that the debt is mine and that I want to deal with the original creditor. The debt has nothing to do with me.

If I had her address and/or phone number I would gladly give it to the collection agency--but I don't have it nor do I want to know it.
 

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
Moderator
Jul 19, 2001
38,572
2
91
Know her name? Maybe we could do a little investigative work for ya :)
 

badluck

Diamond Member
Feb 19, 2001
5,357
0
76
bwass24:

Use the letter as posted above. Edit out the part that makes it sound as if you are accepting any responsibility for the debt. You do not need to tell the collection agency that you are going to work with anybody on it (ie: creditor). You can just tell them that you no longer wanted to be communicated with. That is it.

That is how you stop the madness. If you call a lawyer, they are going to tell him to do the same thing. He'll do it, and you'll have to pay for it. So, just do it yourself, and be done with it.
 

Siddhartha

Lifer
Oct 17, 1999
12,502
1
81
Originally posted by: bwass24
The problem with calling a lawyer (which I still might do) is that I refuse to spend one cent that has any connection with my ex-wife. It's a principle.

I understand you, but to get out of this one without damage you need to get a lawyer involved.

 

Vette73

Lifer
Jul 5, 2000
21,503
8
0
Originally posted by: AmerDoux
Unfortunately, the collections companies tend not to believe you.
Get the company name and address of the collector(s). Write a formal letter stating your response. Request them to remove your phone number/address from their system. Best to send the letter Registered.
Document your correspondence with them (written and verbal)
If, after a couple of weeks the harrassment continues, file a complaint with the BBB. Better companies will take the complaint with the BBB seriously. That usually solves the problem. One of the problems is that while you may have notified the crediting company, the collection has gone to another company. You may still get phone calls from the collections folks. Ask the caller for their company name and address. FYI them that you have filed a complaint with the BBB and you will be filing another, for harrassment against the collection company. You may have to do this a couple of times, but it usually stops after two or three more calls.
If it continues, you have every right to file harrassment charges against the crediting and collections companies.

g/l


Agreed. Get the name and number of the company or 's that are calling. Tell them she does not live there. After that the next time they call get the persons name and file a complaint with the BBB, FTC, and state attorney general.
 

Vic

Elite Member
Jun 12, 2001
50,415
14,305
136
Originally posted by: MistaTastyCakes
Are they third party debt collection agencies? If so, send them this.

Your Name
Your Address
City, State, Zip

(Sent via CERTIFIED RETURN MAIL #123 456 789 with RETURN RECEIPT)

Date:

XYZ Collection Agency/Law Firm
1234 Main Street, #100
Any town, USA 10021

Re: File #0000000 - ABC Bank - #4445566778899000 -For: $5555.55

Dear Debt Collector /Debt Collector Attorney:


This will serve as your legal notice under provisions of federal law, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), to cease all communication with me in regard to the debt referenced above.
If you fail to heed this notice, I will file a formal complaint against you with the Federal Trade Commission who is responsible for enforcement, the States Attorney General office and/or the American Collectors Association or local State Bar Association.
I/We have decided that we do not desire to work with a collection agency under any circumstances. I/We will contact the original creditor to resolve this matter directly, as circumstances warrant.
You are also notified that should any adverse information be placed against my/our credit reports as a result of this notice that appropriate actions will be taken. Give this very important matter the attention it deserves.

Sincerely,

John J. Consumer


Under the rules of the FDCPA, a third party debt collection agency can NOT contact you if you send them a cease communication letter. The letter basically states that you are only willing to speak to the first part company, and if they do contact or harass you or anyone you know, you have grounds for a complaint to the Federal Trade Commision and a lawsuit.

I work for a debt collection agency, and once we get letters like these, we simply call our clients and cancel the person's account, taking it off of our system and ceasing all letters and calls. I hope this helps.
Beautiful. :)

Send exactly this. It does not imply that the original debt is valid or belongs to you. It just says that you wish to work with the original creditor only, "as circumstances warrant."
 

GoodRevrnd

Diamond Member
Dec 27, 2001
6,803
581
126
I seriously don't know what to tell you... they'll probably never let go. My friend got a cell phone, the number of which some asshat gave to Ford creditors. My friend never even knew the guy, their names are nothing alike, there's NOTHING in common except for the phone number. Anyway, the Ford creditors have persisted to call for about a year even after he's explained it multiple times, spoken to various managers, it STILL happens. So the fact that you did actually have some connection with the person they're after... I dunno what to tell you man. :frown: