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5930k adaptive mode not working properly

andrei_shaq

Junior Member
Aug 13, 2017
2
1
1
Hello guys!

About a week ago I decided to make a 'mild' overclock to my 5930k at 4ghz, from 3.6 on my Asus x-99s motherboard. First tried with a voltage of 1.12 than 1.15v than 1.10v (which eventually crashed after about 8 hours of stressing). Than I raised the voltage to 1.15v again and it was stable after 48 hours of stress testing. Never crashed since than so for power consumption and efficiency I decided to use the Adaptive Mode instead of Manual Mode. So I launched BIOS and set it from Manual Mode to Adaptive Mode. I set the turbo vcore to 1.15 (which I found stable within manual mode) and the offset to Auto. When I booted back to windows I launched cpu-z and HWmotinor to check that eveeything saved corectly, I noticed something strange. The max voltage was 1.140 instead of 1.115 so I tough that maybe it's like this because I didn't set an offset. Back to bios I set the offset to 0.05 so if the cpu needs more power it will go from 1.115 to a maximum of 1.120 volts. Booted back to windows..maximum voltage was 1.140 again (**please note that I never used a stress test while under adaptive mode, just light photoshop renedering and gaming**)

What I am doing wrong? Why the max voltage goes to 1.140 instead of 1.115 or 1.120 with offset ( as I set them in the BIOS)?

I really need some.help on this because I feel like i'm doing something wrong and I can't figure out what :(

Thanks!
 

Carfax83

Diamond Member
Nov 1, 2010
6,068
870
126
I had this same issue as well with my 6900K when I first started overclocking it. What the issue was I found, is that the voltage ranges for a given clock speed are actually hardcoded by Intel into the base VID. And because adaptive runs off the base VID (like automatic), it won't let you use less voltage than what the base VID specifies. So if you want to use less voltage than the base VID specifications, then you'll have to use manual mode.....which isn't really recommended.

Adaptive is better, even if the voltage is slightly higher during loads because the idle voltages are much lower and most of the time, your PC will probably be in an idle state unless you're doing something like folding 24/7.
 

Dufus

Senior member
Sep 20, 2010
675
119
101
Adaptive is for voltages above the highest default turbo VID, in your case 3.7GHz according to the Ark.

The trick is to set negative offset first using default clocks, no overclocking. Results may vary from tens of millivolts to over a couple of hundred.

So lets say you end up with -150mV (-0.15V) stable, your top 37x VID is now 150mV lower so if before it was 1.15V it is now 1.00V.

Now lets say you want to overclock to 4.0GHz using 40x multi at 1.15V then we need to set the CPU adaptive part to 1.15V minus the offset so in this case we would set the CPU adaptive voltage to 1.30V which in combination with the negative offset would result in 1.15V. The only part you need to be careful of here is whether the BIOS takes into account the offset voltage when setting the adaptive voltage or not. If it takes it into account then set 1.15V, if not then set 1.3V
 

andrei_shaq

Junior Member
Aug 13, 2017
2
1
1
Thank you a lot guys. I tried why you suggested me with no avail. No matter what I do, when I use adaptive, the cpu will overvolt the specified value in the bios.

A friend suggested me to play a bit with the LLC (load line calibration) for a fine tuning of this problem. Would that be recommended?
 

Carfax83

Diamond Member
Nov 1, 2010
6,068
870
126
Don't see how messing with LLC would help, as it's for preventing vdroop to my knowledge. If it really matters to you, then your best bet is to use a negative offset like what Dufus suggested.

Personally I say just leave it as is. Using a negative offset might solve the problem, but create another one in the process since offsets apply to all voltage ranges including idle.
 

Dufus

Senior member
Sep 20, 2010
675
119
101
How far did you manage with negative offset?

Perhaps the BIOS isn't doing what you think it should be doing. You can check with Throttlestop from -->here<--

A guide -->here<--

And maybe you could post a pic of the FIVR window after the BIOS has adaptive and negative offset set.

Example from the guide
 

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