3D without glasses

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tontod

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Oct 12, 1999
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In this article, a manager at Panasonic claims that 3D without glasses is possible in 10 years.

http://ces.cnet.com/8301-19167_1-10142957-100.html?tag=mncol;txt

That would be awesome, I can see not being able to find my glasses as I'm about to start watching a 3D movie. Dont the glasses provide slightly different images to the left and right eyes? How would they perform that without glasses? Would you have to sit straight behind the TV, thereby limiting viewing angle?
 
May 11, 2008
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In this article, a manager at Panasonic claims that 3D without glasses is possible in 10 years.

http://ces.cnet.com/8301-19167_1-10142957-100.html?tag=mncol;txt

That would be awesome, I can see not being able to find my glasses as I'm about to start watching a 3D movie. Dont the glasses provide slightly different images to the left and right eyes? How would they perform that without glasses? Would you have to sit straight behind the TV, thereby limiting viewing angle?

I found some information...

http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/news/2006/08/71627

A new line of 3-D televisions by Philips uses the familiar trick of sending slightly different images to the left and right eyes -- mimicking our stereoscopic view of the real world. But where old-fashioned 3-D movies rely on the special glasses to block images meant for the other eye, Philips' WOWvx technology places tiny lenses over each of the millions of red, green and blue sub pixels that make up an LCD or plasma screen. The lenses cause each sub pixel to project light at one of nine angles fanning out in front of the display.

A processor in the TV generates nine slightly different views corresponding to the different angles. From almost any location, a viewer catches a different image in each eye.

Providing so many views is key to the dramatic results. Sharp Electronics makes an LCD display that projects just two views, requiring an audience to sit perfectly still in front of the screen. With the Philips technology, viewers can move around without losing much of the effect -- one set of left/right views slips into another, with just a slight double-vision effect in the transitions.


With the panasonic panel i would not know. But according to this article, with the sharp tv you have to sit directly in front of it. And with the philips television you have a more flexible choice of where you position yourself in front of the screen.
 
Last edited:
Dec 30, 2004
12,554
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In this article, a manager at Panasonic claims that 3D without glasses is possible in 10 years.

http://ces.cnet.com/8301-19167_1-10142957-100.html?tag=mncol;txt

That would be awesome, I can see not being able to find my glasses as I'm about to start watching a 3D movie. Dont the glasses provide slightly different images to the left and right eyes? How would they perform that without glasses? Would you have to sit straight behind the TV, thereby limiting viewing angle?

This would probably work better for a computer than a TV-- viewing angle
 

randay

Lifer
May 30, 2006
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i saw an awesome 3d TV in japan at some science museum. it did not require glasses, but you had to stand a certain distance away and look at it head on for the image to pop.
 

dkozloski

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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i saw an awesome 3d TV in japan at some science museum. it did not require glasses, but you had to stand a certain distance away and look at it head on for the image to pop.

You don't need special glasses on the holodeck of the Enterprise.
 

yhelothar

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Dec 11, 2002
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BaDaBooM

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May 3, 2000
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THese guys have been selling these for years:

http://www.dti3d.com

Not sure why it isn't more mainstream/well known. When they were reviewed on Anandtech many years ago the reviewer was blown away with it.
 
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