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YAGT: OMG I love guns

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adairusmc

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2006
7,086
68
91
I plan on using my 300 blackout and suppressor for mule deer hunting this year, if I can draw a tag. I have been happy with the blackout, but if you do not reload or do not have a suppressor, I would stay away.

Supersonic, the ballistics are similar to a 30-30 or 7.62x39, subsonic it is more similar to a .45 ACP or maybe .357 magnum. Range does not get out too far on blackout, but for use with a suppressor, it is amazing.

If you reload, you can make your own brass easily by taking a small harbor freight chop saw, chopping the case neck off, trimming to length, and resizing in a 300 blackout resizing die. I have been experimenting with loads and making my own brass, and it is a fun round if you are into reloading at all. It does cut down on the cost of ammo though, being able to make your own brass.

As far as your conundrum with your rifle pontifex, don't hesitate to look at the Remington 700 despite the quality control issues you hear of Freedom Group having. My LR precision rifle is mostly unchanged out of the box, other than a timney trigger, suppressor mount, and nice optics, and it is an amazing shooter with great fit and finish. My AAC-SD (may have posted this before, with Nightforce NXS 4.5-14x50 with zero stop, one piece remington 700 nightforce rings, timney trigger set to 2.5lb, wyatt detmag bottom metal kit, and YHM Phantom LTA suppressor -



Not as fancy as some of the big money LR range rigs out there, but it gets the job done.
 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
The nice thing about the 700 is it's very popular and has a ton of 3rd party support.
 

adairusmc

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2006
7,086
68
91
I got the call, the new AK I bought from buds has arrived, and I get to go pick it up this afternoon. Will post some pics when I have it.
 

adairusmc

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2006
7,086
68
91
Picture of the new AK to be added to the collection, a century AK63D. This has probably got to be one of the best parts kit AKs I have ever seen, based on fit and finish. Certainly nothing like the century wasr-10's I used to pass on because of canted sights and mag rattle

 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
I have three reloading presses... ask me anything.

Am setting up (slowly) to reload 338 Lapua and 300 WM. Have a Dillon 650 for pistol and 223.

Is there a big difference between carbide and steel dies?

Suggestions for single stage press for the magnum rifle calibers?

Do you have a favorite or suggested case trimmer?
 

IEC

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
14,024
3,844
136
Am setting up (slowly) to reload 338 Lapua and 300 WM. Have a Dillon 650 for pistol and 223.

Is there a big difference between carbide and steel dies?

Suggestions for single stage press for the magnum rifle calibers?

Do you have a favorite or suggested case trimmer?
Carbide dies last longer, take less effort/force to resize cases (still need lube), and hurt the pocketbook a bit more. If you plan on loading lots and lots of rounds I'd say it's worth it to get the carbide. If you only load a few hundred rounds per year, probably not worth the price difference, especially for Dillon dies (+$$-$$$).

Any single stage press will do provided you are using quality parts (especially powder measure). I've reloaded 7.62x54R on a Lee Classic cast single stage, for example. If you don't mind spending close to three bills, a Forster Co-Ax is a nice piece of kit... can never go wrong with a RCBS Rockchucker either.

If you don't mind spending:
Forster Co-Ax
Lapua brass
Match grade bullets (like SMKs)

Should give you pretty good accuracy once you find the right powder/primer/bullet combo for your rifle.
 
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IEC

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
14,024
3,844
136
I use a LE Wilson case trimmer (manual, hand-operated) but I've heard good things about Giraud power trimmers. They are considerably more expensive, however.
 

adairusmc

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2006
7,086
68
91
Have any of you ever used a Beretta 90 Two?




Never seen one before.
Apparently it debuted in 2010.

I own one, and they are great shooters. I like the grip better than a standard 92, and of course it uses all the same mags. I got it as a companion for my beretta cx4 carbine.

 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
Carbide dies last longer, take less effort/force to resize cases (still need lube), and hurt the pocketbook a bit more. If you plan on loading lots and lots of rounds I'd say it's worth it to get the carbide. If you only load a few hundred rounds per year, probably not worth the price difference, especially for Dillon dies (+$$-$$$).

Any single stage press will do provided you are using quality parts (especially powder measure). I've reloaded 7.62x54R on a Lee Classic cast single stage, for example. If you don't mind spending close to three bills, a Forster Co-Ax is a nice piece of kit... can never go wrong with a RCBS Rockchucker either.

If you don't mind spending:
Forster Co-Ax
Lapua brass
Match grade bullets (like SMKs)

Should give you pretty good accuracy once you find the right powder/primer/bullet combo for your rifle.
Scored :) $280 with free shipping.

Will go with a manual case trimmer, not going to a powered model, for the volume I'll be doing, no sense to buy a powered model.

Sigh, it's sure an expensive hobby :)
 
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Kwatt

Golden Member
Jan 3, 2000
1,602
12
81
Which press and dies do you use?
I went with the Lee turret and dies. I did not want to spend on a progressive press. And I have enough of carpel tunnel to not want to go with a single stage which requires more handling of the cases. The more I pick them up the more chances of me dropping them.:)
This one: http://www.amazon.com/Lee-Precision-Classic-Turret-Press/dp/B008M5TSCG?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_search_detailpage It comes with the Lee reloading guide which was recommended by the people at the local range.

I did not like the change-a-disk powder drop. I ordered the micrometer bar I liked it less. Then I bought a auto-drum http://www.amazon.com/Lee-Auto-Drum-Powder/dp/B000N8MURA/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1462576457&sr=1-1&keywords=lee+auto+drum+powder+measure . And it works like a charm for me. Once I get it set. I check the first 5 drops and every 10th it has never varied a 1/10 grain yet.

My first set up was the Lee wack-a-mole.:D http://www.amazon.com/Lee-Precision-9-mm-Luger-Loader/dp/B00162TIXG/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1462576656&sr=1-1&keywords=lee+loader

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Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
I went with the Lee turret and dies. I did not want to spend on a progressive press. And I have enough of carpel tunnel to not want to go with a single stage which requires more handling of the cases. The more I pick them up the more chances of me dropping them.:)
This one: http://www.amazon.com/Lee-Precision-Classic-Turret-Press/dp/B008M5TSCG?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_search_detailpage It comes with the Lee reloading guide which was recommended by the people at the local range.

I did not like the change-a-disk powder drop. I ordered the micrometer bar I liked it less. Then I bought a auto-drum http://www.amazon.com/Lee-Auto-Drum-Powder/dp/B000N8MURA/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1462576457&sr=1-1&keywords=lee+auto+drum+powder+measure . And it works like a charm for me. Once I get it set. I check the first 5 drops and every 10th it has never varied a 1/10 grain yet.

My first set up was the Lee wack-a-mole.:D http://www.amazon.com/Lee-Precision-9-mm-Luger-Loader/dp/B00162TIXG/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1462576656&sr=1-1&keywords=lee+loader

.

And I finally scored a used scope for the Lapua, found a Vortex PST 6-24x50 with rings for $800 (just the rings are $130 retail). Have to love Vortex's warranty, they even cover accidental breakage, and the warranty transfers on used scopes.
 
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Kwatt

Golden Member
Jan 3, 2000
1,602
12
81
And I finally scored a used scope for the Lapua, found a Vortex PST 6-24x50 with rings for $800 (just the rings are $130 retail). Have to love Vortex's warranty, they even cover accidental breakage, and the warranty transfers on used scopes.
I see you are going to be reloading 338LM. A single stage press will probably work better for rifle. I don't know enough to say for sure. I was planning to reload only 9mm when I got started. Then I picked up a 40 carbine. And last month I had a gift card I needed to use so I picked up .38/.357 dies. So, now I no choice but to get a .357 revolver or lever action.;)

A word of warning:
I find I like the reloading to be as fun as the shooting.:) Working up loads for different powders is interesting.

Enjoy


.
 

IEC

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
14,024
3,844
136
I see you are going to be reloading 338LM. A single stage press will probably work better for rifle. I don't know enough to say for sure.
The real reason to go for a progressive press is if you need to produce rounds in significant volume. If you're only going to do a few hundred rounds a year, a quality single stage is a better investment and will produce as high quality reloads as you are capable of.

If you shoot 1000s of rounds a month as I once did, you might as well spring for the Dillon 1050 and go for broke with an autoloader setup.

One day I need to build me one of these:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4D1Q0y5IqM
 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
The real reason to go for a progressive press is if you need to produce rounds in significant volume. If you're only going to do a few hundred rounds a year, a quality single stage is a better investment and will produce as high quality reloads as you are capable of.

If you shoot 1000s of rounds a month as I once did, you might as well spring for the Dillon 1050 and go for broke with an autoloader setup.

One day I need to build me one of these:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4D1Q0y5IqM
I picked up a Dillon 650 XL for pistol & small rifle reloading.

I see you are going to be reloading 338LM. A single stage press will probably work better for rifle. I don't know enough to say for sure. I was planning to reload only 9mm when I got started. Then I picked up a 40 carbine. And last month I had a gift card I needed to use so I picked up .38/.357 dies. So, now I no choice but to get a .357 revolver or lever action.;)

A word of warning:
I find I like the reloading to be as fun as the shooting.:) Working up loads for different powders is interesting.

Enjoy


.
Agreed, I guess the Dillon 550 will work with the 338, but I want to be a bit more precise with the Lapua and 300 WM anyway, so I have a Forster coming.

Harbor Frieght had a woodworking bench on sale, I'll be repurposing it into a reloading bench, should give me enough room to spread out with the 2 stations, and all the gear.
 

Kwatt

Golden Member
Jan 3, 2000
1,602
12
81
The real reason to go for a progressive press is if you need to produce rounds in significant volume. If you're only going to do a few hundred rounds a year, a quality single stage is a better investment and will produce as high quality reloads as you are capable of.

If you shoot 1000s of rounds a month as I once did, you might as well spring for the Dillon 1050 and go for broke with an autoloader setup.
That was what I was thinking too. I fell between those examples.
When I am trying out new loads I'll shoot 60-80 testing and 80-100 practice. If just target practising 150-200. I only go once a week. So I have the time to reload. Doing a 100 an hour or so is easily done once I am set-up. It is loading test rounds that take time. Once I get a load I am going to shoot a lot I'll do a few hundred. Then change over to testing loads.

If I was only doing 9mm I would have to load >5000 rounds to reach pay back on start up cost. But, the satisfaction payback is the 1st day spent shooting nothing but my own reloads.



One day I need to build me one of these:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4D1Q0y5IqM

Nice! I need to be loading several thousand rounds a day to feel good about getting one.:)


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