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YAGT: OMG I love guns

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gill77

Senior member
Aug 3, 2006
643
182
116
I understand bang for the buck, apply that principle often, but not when buying a 1911. They are one of the most magnificent tools a man can own, but they are not for everyone.

Firearms are a different type of purchase. They often increase in value and can last multiple generations.

A Kimber Custom can be found on Slickguns within your price range. Consider finding a good gunsmith for a throat and trigger job. If you want decide to compete at some time, you will be good to go. It is a blast.

If you want to learn how to shoot, you will be going through thousands of rounds. The required cleanings will probably get you to where you could field strip and reassemble your 1911 blindfolded.
 

adairusmc

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2006
7,071
66
91
I understand bang for the buck, apply that principle often, but not when buying a 1911. They are one of the most magnificent tools a man can own, but they are not for everyone.

Firearms are a different type of purchase. They often increase in value and can last multiple generations.

A Kimber Custom can be found on Slickguns within your price range. Consider finding a good gunsmith for a throat and trigger job. If you want decide to compete at some time, you will be good to go. It is a blast.

If you want to learn how to shoot, you will be going through thousands of rounds. The required cleanings will probably get you to where you could field strip and reassemble your 1911 blindfolded.
A kimber custom that is made now is going to be an heirloom as much as they would have been prior to them being bought out by Freedumb group. Now they have the same shit quality control as Remington, yet have the same inflated price as before the acquisition. there are much better options than a kimber, for sure. The finish on Kimber products is horrible as well, and will wear off just by looking at it.

I owned two kimbers before the boating accident, and while they shoot just fine, I got them second hand (And they are pre-freedumb group) and I would never recommend someone spend their money on a new one at this point.
 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
If I wanted to shoot at a Hooters building, I guess I need a .45...

Found a nice SS Kimber for under $750 shipped, really tempted.

Adair, what do you think of the Rugers?
 

gill77

Senior member
Aug 3, 2006
643
182
116
My Kimbers are at least ten years old and have served me well. I have never fired one recently produced.

One thing to consider is the cost of ammunition. All ammunition has gone way up but for some reason the spread between 45 and 9mm seems to have increased. It really doesn't take much to pay more in ammo than the cost of the gun.

Colt makes a full size 9mm 1911 which is on my wish list despite not having fired.

Stainless guns look nice, but you may not want them to be seen. A glint off your stainless at night can be disadvantageous.
 

RampantAndroid

Diamond Member
Jun 27, 2004
6,591
3
81
If you want 9mm in a 1911-ish platform, look at a Browning Hi-Power. Great feeling gun meant for 9mm. It's a truly amazing feeling gun (even with the bloody mag safety still in it.)

As for S&W - I owned one for a bit. I'm not big into full size 1911s and so I sold it, but it worked great. The older S&W 1911s have extractor issues though, so be careful. The newer ones worked it out.

Ruger seems a fine brand these days - I'd just look for people's reports on the 1911s you're looking at. See if they needed to do any work replacing parts to get the gun to run smoothly.
 

adairusmc

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2006
7,071
66
91
My Kimbers are at least ten years old and have served me well. I have never fired one recently produced.

One thing to consider is the cost of ammunition. All ammunition has gone way up but for some reason the spread between 45 and 9mm seems to have increased. It really doesn't take much to pay more in ammo than the cost of the gun.

Colt makes a full size 9mm 1911 which is on my wish list despite not having fired.

Stainless guns look nice, but you may not want them to be seen. A glint off your stainless at night can be disadvantageous.
Kimbers made after 2008 or so seem to be where you see the quality really really dropping.
 

gill77

Senior member
Aug 3, 2006
643
182
116
Personally, I would not purchase a 1911 based solely on a single positive or negative opinion provided on this forum, although feedback from actual users can add a data point or two to your decision making process.

If you do turn out to be a "1911 guy" you will understand and fully appreciate your decision not to go for the low end. They really are a small part of the overall market however.

My first 1911 was a Colt. Loved it, but it was stolen. Certainly would own another.

I am also impressed by my SIG, but it is not a 1911 and have never fired one.

Bought a cheap 1911. Sold it.

I would say use Google to come up with a short list that is in your price range. Read some reviews. Go to a gun store or two. Rack the slides, and dry fire if they let you.
 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
Personally, I would not purchase a 1911 based solely on a single positive or negative opinion provided on this forum, although feedback from actual users can add a data point or two to your decision making process.

If you do turn out to be a "1911 guy" you will understand and fully appreciate your decision not to go for the low end. They really are a small part of the overall market however.

My first 1911 was a Colt. Loved it, but it was stolen. Certainly would own another.

I am also impressed by my SIG, but it is not a 1911 and have never fired one.

Bought a cheap 1911. Sold it.

I would say use Google to come up with a short list that is in your price range. Read some reviews. Go to a gun store or two. Rack the slides, and dry fire if they let you.

I bought a cheap 1911 and sold it without shooting it some years ago, I'm mostly looking for a range toy, and do double duty as a home defense weapon.
Will never shoot competitively, love the looks of a race gun, but the reality is I like the way a heavy framed pistol feels pumping out .45 ammo, and a race gun is way too expensive. I like SS in pistols, I have a couple of Glocks for EDC, and don't care if they get some scratches and patina from EDC duty.

Also, there's some awesome posters here that I respect, and give great advice, your post for example :)
 
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madoka

Diamond Member
Jun 22, 2004
4,344
707
121
I think we had this conversation already, but Ruger is probably the best deal for a beginners 1911.
That's what I would recommend. The SR1911 is an amazing value.

For the $1000-$2000 range, I think the Springfield TRP is the best deal.

You have rapidly diminishing returns after $2K.
 

clamum

Lifer
Feb 13, 2003
26,225
384
126
I recently watched a YouTube video from InRange about the 1.5x scope the Wehrmacht used on their K98s. I commented that I would LOVE a K98k but that they're expensive (at least the ones I've seen).

A guy replied to my comment and said that Aim Surplus had M48 Mausers. I'd definitely like one of those, much more so than an M24/47. Coincidentally, I recently received my C&R license. Amazingly, before they were sold out, I was able to pick up a B-grade M48 for $300! Man I'm so pumped!

 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
Nice, that's some serious history there, another one of those "changed the world" items
 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
Saw a 1911-R1 enhanced over the weekend, was impressed. Considering picking up a used one.
 

clamum

Lifer
Feb 13, 2003
26,225
384
126
Nice, that's some serious history there, another one of those "changed the world" items
Yeah I'm a big history junkie so these mil-surp rifles really strike my fancy. I think I'm more excited for this rifle than I was my Tavor, or 300 BLK pistol I built.

Saw a 1911-R1 enhanced over the weekend, was impressed. Considering picking up a used one.
I handled them several times when trying to pick my first 1911 and ALMOST bought one. I ended up going with a Springfield Range Officer but I'm not a big fan of the sights on it. I sometimes think I should've went with the R1 Enhanced instead but I'm happy regardless.
 

adairusmc

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2006
7,071
66
91
I bought a new Ruger American rimfire yesterday, in what I thought was 22LR, to use with my 22 suppressor. I go straight out to go do some shooting, and when I get there I found out they accidentally sold me a 22 magnum version.

I have to take it in this morning to try and get it exchanged for the .22LR rifle they were supposed to sell me.
 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
Yeah I'm a big history junkie so these mil-surp rifles really strike my fancy. I think I'm more excited for this rifle than I was my Tavor, or 300 BLK pistol I built.



I handled them several times when trying to pick my first 1911 and ALMOST bought one. I ended up going with a Springfield Range Officer but I'm not a big fan of the sights on it. I sometimes think I should've went with the R1 Enhanced instead but I'm happy regardless.
Still looking at the Ruger, and considering a S&W 1911 E series Tactical, really like the checkered pattern on the front of the grip, feels solid as hell.

And holy shit Sig puts out some nice looking stuff, fell in love with a 45 Spartan...
 
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clamum

Lifer
Feb 13, 2003
26,225
384
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I picked up some VZ Grips for my 1911 (and 22/45 Lite). The wood ones that came with it were not bad but there wasn't much grip to them, and I'm much more a fan of light/blond wood than the dark ones it came with. But the VZ Grips are sexy as poop.
 

dud

Diamond Member
Feb 18, 2001
7,631
72
91
I recently watched a YouTube video from InRange about the 1.5x scope the Wehrmacht used on their K98s. I commented that I would LOVE a K98k but that they're expensive (at least the ones I've seen).

A guy replied to my comment and said that Aim Surplus had M48 Mausers. I'd definitely like one of those, much more so than an M24/47. Coincidentally, I recently received my C&R license. Amazingly, before they were sold out, I was able to pick up a B-grade M48 for $300! Man I'm so pumped!


Did you consider getting an Russian Capture (RC) German K98 before you bought the Yugo? Yugos tend to have very little historical/collecting value ... hence the cheaper prices. If you look around you can find an actual German K98 RC with non-matching parts for less than $500. I purchased a K98k RC 1938 S/147 last year ago for a little over $400. The gun has a lot of historical value as it fought on the Russian Front, was captured by the Russians and put into long-term storage. NONE of the original metalwork is defaced. All of the original Waffenamts are present. The gun is in great condition and shoots great (but kicks like a mule).

When you own a Mauser you have to consider the higher cost of ammo. You can buy new for as much as $1 per round ... or you can search out the surplus market. I just picked up 300 rounds of Yugo 8mm with manufacture dates of 1954 through 56. It's dirty ammo but it still goes BANG after all these years.

Good luck ...
 

RampantAndroid

Diamond Member
Jun 27, 2004
6,591
3
81
I recently watched a YouTube video from InRange about the 1.5x scope the Wehrmacht used on their K98s. I commented that I would LOVE a K98k but that they're expensive (at least the ones I've seen).

A guy replied to my comment and said that Aim Surplus had M48 Mausers. I'd definitely like one of those, much more so than an M24/47. Coincidentally, I recently received my C&R license. Amazingly, before they were sold out, I was able to pick up a B-grade M48 for $300! Man I'm so pumped!

Having bought a reworked K98, make sure you check the stock. The 8mm Mauser round was a stout round to fire, and was at much higher pressures than 30-06 in WWII (SAAMI spec 8mm mauser has nearly halved the pressure iirc - mostly because you can chamber an 8mm round into an older Gewer 88 rifle and end up with a squib load.) The higher pressures wrecked the laminated stocks the Germans used, specifically as the recoil lug slowly gets driven backwards towards the butt stock, the back of the receiver comes into contact with the stock and starts to split the wrist of the stock apart. When the Russians would capture K98s, it was compulsory for them to drive a metal reinforcing rod through the wrist of the stock to prevent the stock from failing in this manner.

My K98 has a stock that's splitting apart - the area around the trigger is split, as is the wrist. The recoil lug looks like it's slowly failing. I'm planning to just put a walnut stock on the gun, even if it isn't "correct". It's what the Germans should have used...they just didn't have enough high quality wood on hand to do it.
 

Artdeco

Platinum Member
Mar 14, 2015
2,682
1
0
Well, am leaning towards a SW1911 E Series Enhanced, really like the checkering on the front strap of 1911's, but it's expensive as hell to have it done, and the guns with it from the factory are pretty expensive. Looking on GunBroker, have a couple of candidates for lightly used models...
 

clamum

Lifer
Feb 13, 2003
26,225
384
126
Did you consider getting an Russian Capture (RC) German K98 before you bought the Yugo? Yugos tend to have very little historical/collecting value ... hence the cheaper prices. If you look around you can find an actual German K98 RC with non-matching parts for less than $500. I purchased a K98k RC 1938 S/147 last year ago for a little over $400. The gun has a lot of historical value as it fought on the Russian Front, was captured by the Russians and put into long-term storage. NONE of the original metalwork is defaced. All of the original Waffenamts are present. The gun is in great condition and shoots great (but kicks like a mule).
Didn't consider a Russian capture... I just didn't see any K98ks for a price I didn't think was a little nuts. I didn't scour the Internet either, but it wasn't an absolute priority for me to have the K98k. I thought a parts-correct M48 for $300 wasn't a bad choice. Seems like mil-surps in general are drying up, no matter the gun, and prices only go up.

Having bought a reworked K98, make sure you check the stock. The 8mm Mauser round was a stout round to fire, and was at much higher pressures than 30-06 in WWII (SAAMI spec 8mm mauser has nearly halved the pressure iirc - mostly because you can chamber an 8mm round into an older Gewer 88 rifle and end up with a squib load.) The higher pressures wrecked the laminated stocks the Germans used, specifically as the recoil lug slowly gets driven backwards towards the butt stock, the back of the receiver comes into contact with the stock and starts to split the wrist of the stock apart. When the Russians would capture K98s, it was compulsory for them to drive a metal reinforcing rod through the wrist of the stock to prevent the stock from failing in this manner.

My K98 has a stock that's splitting apart - the area around the trigger is split, as is the wrist. The recoil lug looks like it's slowly failing. I'm planning to just put a walnut stock on the gun, even if it isn't "correct". It's what the Germans should have used...they just didn't have enough high quality wood on hand to do it.
Thanks for the tip. From what I can see, there's no splitting or issues with the stock. Man is the thing fricking CAKED in Cosmoline, though. Makes my 91/30, when I bought it, look spit-shine clean, lol. I have an ultrasonic cleaner so I think I'm gonna employ that in my cleaning mission. The Garand Gear guide on Cosmoline removal recommended one so we'll see how it goes.

Btw, would you guys refinish a stock on a parts-correct M48? I did on my 91/30 (also has matching parts but it isn't anything special either) and it looks a million times better than it did. I'm sure it hurt resale value but I'm not sure by how much. I'm debating whether to do it or not on my M48. I guess I'll get it all cleaned up first and see how it is before I decide.
 

rudder

Lifer
Nov 9, 2000
19,434
84
91
Waiting on a new gun:



Had to order online. Seems these are hard to find. These have mostly gotten great reviews. There are some kel-tec haters but we will see. As soon as I get it I will run through a range bucket and report back.

Finally ditching my venerable M1 Carbine. It is getting to be a hassle to have to order ammo online. Even here is gunworld, TN.... I have only found .30 on the shelf in one store that was a decent price. Also I am just trying to reduce the different kinds of ammo I have to keep on hand. Now it will just be .22, 9mm, and .308.

EDIT: oh and this thing also comes with a threaded barrel.. now to sit and wait for the ATF paperwork.
 
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Kwatt

Golden Member
Jan 3, 2000
1,602
12
81
Waiting on a new gun:



Had to order online.
Is that a 1st gen or 2nd?
Which magazines for it?
Where did you order it from?

I have a 40 HiPoint that has been flawless that replaced a 30 carbine. I kinda think I would have been happier with a 9mm though.

.
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
81
Didn't consider a Russian capture... I just didn't see any K98ks for a price I didn't think was a little nuts. I didn't scour the Internet either, but it wasn't an absolute priority for me to have the K98k. I thought a parts-correct M48 for $300 wasn't a bad choice. Seems like mil-surps in general are drying up, no matter the gun, and prices only go up.



Thanks for the tip. From what I can see, there's no splitting or issues with the stock. Man is the thing fricking CAKED in Cosmoline, though. Makes my 91/30, when I bought it, look spit-shine clean, lol. I have an ultrasonic cleaner so I think I'm gonna employ that in my cleaning mission. The Garand Gear guide on Cosmoline removal recommended one so we'll see how it goes.

Btw, would you guys refinish a stock on a parts-correct M48? I did on my 91/30 (also has matching parts but it isn't anything special either) and it looks a million times better than it did. I'm sure it hurt resale value but I'm not sure by how much. I'm debating whether to do it or not on my M48. I guess I'll get it all cleaned up first and see how it is before I decide.
I'm a fan of boiling water for cosmoline removal. Take him apart. Use a large pot and get water boiling. Turn heat off. Drop parts in. Come back in 10 minutes (or less) and most of the cosmoline is gone and what is left usually just wipes off with a paper towel. Doing barrels and stocks can be tricky but they can be do e this way too.

An ultrasonic works too the main thing I've found is heat helps a ton
 

Jeeebus

Diamond Member
Aug 29, 2006
9,121
784
126
"Bought" (ok, paid for, and now wait a year) a Gemtech MK9K suppressor today for my MP5 sbr build. At some point in the next year I may actually get to use the thing.
 

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