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X9000 cpu, in my HP 8710p Lap top. Can I OVERCLOCK?

Danozzz

Junior Member
Mar 15, 2020
10
2
41
Hi there,
I have a X9000 CPU from a mate.
Intending to upgrade my HP 8710p. Laptop
Can I overclock it? If so, what is a maximum safe level?

I am relatively new at this so any tips would be appreciated.
Running 8 Gig of ram and a SSD.

Thank you.
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
20,562
1,029
126
No.

It's a locked CPU in a HP laptop, so that's not going to be an option for you.
Unintuitively, this is an unlocked CPU. It's a dual core Penryn gen Core 2 Duo.


OP, get the Intel XTU software, it should give you multiplier control.

Pay VERY close attention to the thermals. Overclocking laptops can have marginal or even negative results due to limited cooling abilities, though this being a Penryn and not having an IHS makes it more likely to do 'ok' than one might expect.

It's likely that the age of this thing means your stock thermal paste is dried up. Look up disassembly guides for your laptop on YouTube, and if it looks like something you can tackle, disassembling and replacing the stock thermal paste and blowing out the fans will really pay off big, OC or no OC. Reapply to any heatsink contact zone eg; chipset or GPU as well.
 

AAbattery

Junior Member
Jan 11, 2019
6
8
41
You can try a program like Throttlestop to get the best performance through undervolting and keeping high clocks for longer periods, but the normal peak CPU speed will still not be exceeded.
Oh, but I guess the X9000 might be unlocked after all, so the Intel utility should work.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
13,285
3,951
146
Unintuitively, this is an unlocked CPU. It's a dual core Penryn gen Core 2 Duo.
Yup, you're right.

Intel didn't list that in it's official specs, and I didn't look any further.

That said, I'd be very surprised if there are any overclocking options in the HP BIOS (the BIOS is likely very locked down). And even if by an act of god they offered something there, I just don't think a person would be able to gain anything substantial because of heat/power.
 
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Danozzz

Junior Member
Mar 15, 2020
10
2
41
Thank you for your input.

Arkaign you mention the use of Thermal paste on the chip set. Lats time I looked there were small " pads " on the heat sink. Should these be peeled off and replaced with thermal paste?

Thank you
 

Danozzz

Junior Member
Mar 15, 2020
10
2
41
Unintuitively, this is an unlocked CPU. It's a dual core Penryn gen Core 2 Duo.


OP, get the Intel XTU software, it should give you multiplier control.

Pay VERY close attention to the thermals. Overclocking laptops can have marginal or even negative results due to limited cooling abilities, though this being a Penryn and not having an IHS makes it more likely to do 'ok' than one might expect.

It's likely that the age of this thing means your stock thermal paste is dried up. Look up disassembly guides for your laptop on YouTube, and if it looks like something you can tackle, disassembling and replacing the stock thermal paste and blowing out the fans will really pay off big, OC or no OC. Reapply to any heatsink contact zone eg; chipset or GPU as well.
Thank you for your input.

Arkaign you mention the use of Thermal paste on the chip set. Last time I looked there were small " pads " on the heat sink. Should these be peeled off and replaced with thermal paste?

Thank you
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
20,562
1,029
126
If there are pads, and they're more than razor thin, then they're there to bridge the gap between the HSF and the CPU die surface. If it's just the sticker type, then yes they can be replaced with just a good quality paste.
 

Hans Gruber

Senior member
Dec 23, 2006
934
259
136
I have a couple of Thinkpad W500 thinkpads with the X9000 CPU. That thinkpad has a 1920x1200 16:10 screen. There is no need to OC. It has a boost that pumps it up to 3.06ghz. At this point any Ocing would not be beneficial in 2020.
 

unclewebb

Member
May 28, 2012
54
9
71
The X9000 is an Extreme CPU so you can definitely overclock it by using ThrottleStop.

If you can find a way to keep it cool, 4000 MHz is possible.

 
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Hans Gruber

Senior member
Dec 23, 2006
934
259
136
The X9000 is an Extreme CPU so you can definitely overclock it by using ThrottleStop.

If you can find a way to keep it cool, 4000 MHz is possible.

It's more than 10 year old architecture. Even if you could run it @ 5ghz. It would not provide a substantial increase in performance today vs. modern CPU's.
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
20,562
1,029
126
It's more than 10 year old architecture. Even if you could run it @ 5ghz. It would not provide a substantial increase in performance today vs. modern CPU's.
While true from a certain perspective, it could still offer a difference beyond stock IF the cooling is up to par, which honestly is a big if. Not everyone is trying to run the latest and greatest games and software, and 10 or 20 percent is still 10 or 20 percent. Newer, more powerful, more money, all that is fine, but not everyone has it on hand or to spare.

I would still recommend the utmost caution aand attention to temps, and awareness of potential power limit throttling as well.
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
20,562
1,029
126
The X9000 is an Extreme CPU so you can definitely overclock it by using ThrottleStop.

If you can find a way to keep it cool, 4000 MHz is possible.

Unclewebb, absolute legend.

I need to pick your brain sometime on why I can OC certain systems with E5-1650 v1, v2, and v3 CPUs, and not others. It's bizarre.
 

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