Windows Genuine Advantage Notification Starts This Week

RebateMonger

Elite Member
Dec 24, 2005
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The new "Windows Genuine Advantage Notification" system will begin implementation this Tuesday, April 25. This will be used on Windows XP. This program applies to OEM, Retail, and Volume License versions of XP.

Not everybody will see this change immediately. There will be a phased introduction. When you get the new Notification tool will be decided by Microsoft.

When Windows Updates are run, a new WGA tool will install. After WGA checks for authenticity, if it finds a problem, it will start posting warnings at bootup and via popup balloon messges.

"This copy of Windows is not genuine."
"You may be a victim of software counterfeiting."


After 14 days, there will be an hourly warning that a non-Genuine copy of Windows is being used. You can turn off the warnings if you wish, but they will return with each Windows update.

As long as a non-Genuine copy is detected, certain updates won't be possible but Windows XP will continue to function.

Those with non-Genuine copies will be offered an online purchase directly from Microsoft for $149 for XP Professional and $99 for XP Home. For this price, you'll receive a key, a COA, and a CD. There will be other options given for fixing the problem, including resolving the problem with the supplier of the software or PC, buying a retail version, buying an OEM version from a legitimate reseller, or getting a free copy from MS (but only when VERY HIGH GRADE counterfeit software is involved, and the user fills out MS's piracy report form).

There's some discussion on this site, but Microsoft should have public web pages discussing the new program on Tuesday, April 25. There are screenshots of the MS Partner presentation here, showing the notification screens.
 

Addikt

Senior member
Apr 26, 2004
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Thanks Microsoft. Yet again introducing functionality that no one wants/needs at the expense of the consumer. I can guarantee that this thing, like SP2 is going to be a nightmare for me because Microsoft seems to take joy in making my computer usage experience as frustrating as possible. Rather than do some actual work on their operating system they are content with protecting their profits, and I doubt that Microsoft is really seeing any huge losses in profits from piracy of their operating system. It is a multi-billion dollar, multi-divisional company involved in so many markets. Not to mention that corporate clients, the ones who pay the big bucks for bulk software bundles, are the ones that actually keep them in business not us the little fish they could really spend time on something else.

I have a copy of windows XP that does not need online verification it's part of a mass order to those involved in the public education system, teachers, principals, secretaries, etc. How much do you want to bet that I'm going to get a warning for not using genuine hardware?

Let me just say it again. Thanks Microsoft. *starts slow clap*
 

doornail

Senior member
Oct 10, 1999
333
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<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.distrowatch.com">"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me.
I lift my lamp beside the golden door."</a>
 

nweaver

Diamond Member
Jan 21, 2001
6,813
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I don't see the problem with this. I would guess that 90% won't even be effected by this, as they have OEM hardware and software. You can whine about MS pushing customers away, but they majority they will be "pushing" are non paying customers.


not to mention, I dont' see the problem with this as I'm posting this from my Debian box.
 

KDOG

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
5,561
14
81
Don't mean to hijack this thread, but I'm running Ubuntu and I just CANNOT get a software DVD player on it. It has Totem but it won't play a DVD. It keeps asking for a plugin. Do any other OS that doornail linked to have DVD playback functionality built in?

As far as the topic goes, it only seems like people who are running bootleg copies of Windows will be affected by this. Serves them right. DON'T STEAL SOFTWARE.
 

cubby1223

Lifer
May 24, 2004
13,518
42
86
Looks like a lot of people will be in for a reality check. Every so often there would be a post here about someone saying how a retail copy can installed and activated on several machines - from what that article is saying, these people will be in for a nice surpise as well.

Anyways, I still don't like all these anti-piracy measures. I'm tired of calling MS when I have to do a repair install on someone's Dell computer. And I'm especially tired of other companies who try to follow MS's footsteps and screw it all up - many people buy Norton Anti-Virus because it's what's at Best Buy, and that software is such a pain to help install for people (or uninstall / reinstall when spyware messes with it), and I think it's because Symantec is so paranoid over piracy they make their software too difficult to work with...

And besides, I'm sure this new WGA software is a likely target for new spyware to attack and screw up, then really start messing with actual legit owners of the software.

I was at a person's home fixing his computer once and I ran into a situation where I needed to grab the Resource Toolkit from MS to use their utility to wipe out the printers. Well, it's protected behind WGA authentication, and the servers that you downloaded the WGA software was down at the time. So it was a wasted day and I had to go back the next day to fix the computer.

So the moral of the story is, anti-piracy measures does make life difficult for some legit users. The ONLY people this new WGA software is going to do anything for is those who don't realize they have pirated software. And besides, it is a step closer to Big Brother. No matter how much Microsoft says they don't collect personally identifiable information, I still don't trust them one bit.
 

erikistired

Diamond Member
Sep 27, 2000
9,739
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Originally posted by: Addikt
Thanks Microsoft. Yet again introducing functionality that no one wants/needs at the expense of the consumer. I can guarantee that this thing, like SP2 is going to be a nightmare for me because Microsoft seems to take joy in making my computer usage experience as frustrating as possible. Rather than do some actual work on their operating system they are content with protecting their profits, and I doubt that Microsoft is really seeing any huge losses in profits from piracy of their operating system. It is a multi-billion dollar, multi-divisional company involved in so many markets. Not to mention that corporate clients, the ones who pay the big bucks for bulk software bundles, are the ones that actually keep them in business not us the little fish they could really spend time on something else.

I have a copy of windows XP that does not need online verification it's part of a mass order to those involved in the public education system, teachers, principals, secretaries, etc. How much do you want to bet that I'm going to get a warning for not using genuine hardware?

Let me just say it again. Thanks Microsoft. *starts slow clap*

unless you're stealing xp you shouldn't have a problem with this.
 

erikistired

Diamond Member
Sep 27, 2000
9,739
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Originally posted by: doornail
<a target=_blank class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.distrowatch.com">"Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me.
I lift my lamp beside the golden door."</a>

when linux/bsd has 1/10 the functionality of windows you might have a chance.
 

erikistired

Diamond Member
Sep 27, 2000
9,739
0
0
Originally posted by: cubby1223
Looks like a lot of people will be in for a reality check. Every so often there would be a post here about someone saying how a retail copy can installed and activated on several machines - from what that article is saying, these people will be in for a nice surpise as well.

Anyways, I still don't like all these anti-piracy measures. I'm tired of calling MS when I have to do a repair install on someone's Dell computer. And I'm especially tired of other companies who try to follow MS's footsteps and screw it all up - many people buy Norton Anti-Virus because it's what's at Best Buy, and that software is such a pain to help install for people (or uninstall / reinstall when spyware messes with it), and I think it's because Symantec is so paranoid over piracy they make their software too difficult to work with...

And besides, I'm sure this new WGA software is a likely target for new spyware to attack and screw up, then really start messing with actual legit owners of the software.

I was at a person's home fixing his computer once and I ran into a situation where I needed to grab the Resource Toolkit from MS to use their utility to wipe out the printers. Well, it's protected behind WGA authentication, and the servers that you downloaded the WGA software was down at the time. So it was a wasted day and I had to go back the next day to fix the computer.

So the moral of the story is, anti-piracy measures does make life difficult for some legit users. The ONLY people this new WGA software is going to do anything for is those who don't realize they have pirated software. And besides, it is a step closer to Big Brother. No matter how much Microsoft says they don't collect personally identifiable information, I still don't trust them one bit.

if people would stop stealing software than things like this wouldn't exist. stop blaming MS for at least trying to protect their business.

i'm sure MS won't be upset if you stop making a living piggybacking off their products. :)
 

mechBgon

Super Moderator<br>Elite Member
Oct 31, 1999
30,699
1
0
Thanks for the heads-up. I'll brace for a serious wave of bleating and impotent fist-shaking when people start getting calls from their mom/dad/uncle/gf about this strange pop-up they keep getting :evil:
 

Nothinman

Elite Member
Sep 14, 2001
30,672
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I doubt that Microsoft is really seeing any huge losses in profits from piracy of their operating system.

So? Stealing from the rich is still stealing.

I have a copy of windows XP that does not need online verification it's part of a mass order to those involved in the public education system, teachers, principals, secretaries, etc. How much do you want to bet that I'm going to get a warning for not using genuine hardware?

They're talking about genuine software, not hardware and if your license is good then you have nothing to worry about.

Let me just say it again. Thanks Microsoft. *starts slow clap*

If you don't like it, don't use their software.

when linux/bsd has 1/10 the functionality of windows you might have a chance.

Odd, I'd be willing to bet that I can easily come up with 10 things that I can do in Linux that you can't do in Windows.

 

jjones

Lifer
Oct 9, 2001
15,425
2
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So, how long you think it will take for someone to hack this and make it yet another futile effort on the part of MS? I don't blame MS for doing more and more things like this, but it really won't affect the users of a pirated OS; they just won't update until a hack comes out, which likely won't be long.
 

Jeff7

Lifer
Jan 4, 2001
41,599
19
81
Originally posted by: jjones
So, how long you think it will take for someone to hack this and make it yet another futile effort on the part of MS? I don't blame MS for doing more and more things like this, but it really won't affect the users of a pirated OS; they just won't update until a hack comes out, which likely won't be long.

Implementation is April 25th. I'd say sometime on April 25th a hack will be out. :p

Those with non-Genuine copies will be offered an online purchase directly from Microsoft for $149 for XP Professional and $99 for XP Home.
$150 for XP Home? Is that the retail version? If so, there's got to be a catch.

(Side note. XP is what, 5 years old now? Why is it still sold for near the original list price in stores? Any reasons other than pure monopoly power?)
 

Nothinman

Elite Member
Sep 14, 2001
30,672
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(Side note. XP is what, 5 years old now? Why is it still sold for near the original list price in stores? Any reasons other than pure monopoly power?)

Because software doesn't depreciate until there's a version released to replace the older one? In some cases software manufacturers will increase the price of the older versions of software to discourage people from purchasing them.
 

RebateMonger

Elite Member
Dec 24, 2005
11,588
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Originally posted by: Jeff7
$150 for XP Home? Is that the retail version? If so, there's got to be a catch.
Well, XP is reaching end-of-life. Microsoft probably won't be selling many more copies, so $150 is gravy to them. In a few months, MS will be forced to hand out "free upgrade to Vista" with every copy of XP. So a sale now is much more profitable.
 

mechBgon

Super Moderator<br>Elite Member
Oct 31, 1999
30,699
1
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In a few months, MS will be forced to hand out "free upgrade to Vista" with every copy of XP. So a sale now is much more profitable.
Seriously? :Q Me me me, tell me more about this!

 

Seeruk

Senior member
Nov 16, 2003
986
0
0
I believe this is only an issue for those....

WITH SOMETHING TO WORRY ABOUT ;)

I'm intrigued to hear the 10 things though Nothinman :)
 

Zugzwang152

Lifer
Oct 30, 2001
12,134
1
0
I gotta say, hats off to Nothinman for completely owning this thread.

He speaks the truth. Stealing is stealing.


But I'm still waiting for that list of things you can only do in Linux.
 

drag

Elite Member
Jul 4, 2002
8,708
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Originally posted by: Seeruk
I believe this is only an issue for those....

WITH SOMETHING TO WORRY ABOUT ;)

I'm intrigued to hear the 10 things though Nothinman :)

Now if you put a limit on it.. Like 10 things you can do in Linux that would cost more then 1000-5000 dollars in Windows. That's fairly simple. Thing is is that with open source software most of it works better in Linux, but since it's open source they port it to windows also (as well as many other operating systems).

But.. Host a OpenAFS server or Lustre server. Both are distributed file systems. OpenAFS has strong kerberos-based authentication system with lightweight encryption and advanced cache'ing and file locking capabilities. It's usefull for WAN-linked campus setup. Local cache is stored on harddrive and makes fast file access, even while temporarially disconnected, while it has mechanisms to check back on the server for any file changes so that it's usefull in a multiuser environment. It's a very old file system, but much more advanced then either CIFS or NFS. Open sourced by IBM a while ago and it has gained quite a bit in stability since then. Not realy suitable for fast local access of large files.

Lustre is a high performance clustering file system commonly used in large linux clusters. Capable of 10's of gigabytes per second file transfers. It's the type of thing that people use to break speed records. Aggregates the file I/O capabilities of multiple computers and/or SANs in a clustered environment.

There are other unique file systems (been studying linux network file systems a lot lately)

drbd - a nice failover file system. 2 nodes mirror a file system in a sort of raid-style setup. It's able to automaticly sense if one node goes down so that the other mounts it. Often used in conjunction with the Linux HA project (heart beat) so that you can take services and load balance services and/or configure them for high aviability. If a system goes down, another picks it up automaticly sort of thing. This is definate 'realm of mortals' type stuff, commonly used in situations that need to be highly aviable on a budget. (important ftp server for instance on two old desktop-turned-linux-server setup.)

OCFSv2 - Oracle clustering file system version 2. Developed for Oracle RAC setups, but is designed for general purpose items.

GFS - Redhat clustering file system. Made up of many different systems, and with some add-ons. Designed mostly for SANs. There is stuff like clvm, which is a logical volume manager for clusters.. Multiple machines can access the same file systems simulatiniously and everything is kept track of. That sort of thing. Usefull for 'extending' expensive SANs fabric across cheaper gigabit ethernet networks were servers running databases/network-based services or further distribute file access using normal network file systems such as CIFS via SAMBA. Also usefull for distributing file system absent of SANs via gnbd

PVFS2 - Parrallel virtual file system 2. A block-level distributed file system (block level distribution is better for things like databases then normal file-level items like CIFS or NFS). Used to combine multiple computer's I/O in a RAID-Like fasion.

FUSE - "Filesystem in UserSpacE" This is much more interesting for desktop-style items then the above stuff. This setups a generic framework that allows users to setup and manage file systems without having to have root access or kernel-level drivers. I personally use this with:

Sshfs - Filesystem over ssh. It's nice way to access your files on your file server without having to open up extra ports to your file server. Everything is encrypted and it uses just normal ssh stuff. So it works with password authentication, public/private keypair, Even though it uses encryption it is actually very very fast. It's slightly faster then NFS on a 100Mbit/s network and almost twice as fast as CIFS/SMB. (file transfers that would take 2 minutes or less using NFS or SSHFS would take 4 minutes over Samba, and samba is typically a bit faster then Windows, especially for Linux to Linux since it's able to skip some windows compatability stuff)

Encfs - Encrypted file system. You setup a empty directory (personally it's on my file server) and mount it using encfs. You choose what sort of encryption you want (AES or Blowfish with a veriaty of key sizes) or choose 'normal' or 'paranoid' defaults. Protected by a password... Copy anything you want into there, then umount it and it's safely encrypted. You can copy it around, move that directory from computer to computer and as long as you have that password you can decrypt it easily.

Then there are other systems. People write file systems in C, C++ or even Python or Perl. There are oddballs like Gmail FS (mount files based on google's gmail). Also stuff that may be usefull for web developers or bloggers. Stuff like Fusedev were you can mount a file system using the Webdev API locally. HTTP-Fuse, use http-based file system. BlogFS.. this allows you to mount blog entries and such from Wordpress-based blogs (and maybe a couple other types of blogging software). Things like that. Mount smb shares. Mount ntfs, that sort of thing.

Exciting, I know.

Otherwise you have niceties in Linux in ragards to Free software. It's it's principal advantage. (all mentioned above is Free software items also).

I can use apt-get to install a veriaty of programs. 3d game/motion picture development. Electrical engineering cad stuff. Childrens games. Video editors. Vector based drawing items. Math stuff. Scientific programming libraries. A veriaty of office suites. Audio production items. DJ stuff. Photo editing/painting stuff. Prorgramming tools. veriaty of IDEs. Server stuff (apache, samba, etc etc. No per seat licenses. No limits on performance, no limits on connections, no limits on users, no limits on anything, besides technical). Astronomy items. etc etc etc etc.

All of it is kept more or less up to date. Everything is updated in one go with 'wajig update && wajig upgrade' or whatever tool you like to use. Not just core items, like with MS, but everything you install via the package managers.

I can use Asterix-at-home to build a enterpise-level VoIP solution that has been scaled down for home use. It's actually used by some phone companies. Completely free software, lots of related not-very-free-at-all (but not that expensive either) hardware and such. Halafax does the same thing, more or less, with faxes. Email faxes to people, receive emails as PDFs, that sort of thing. For corporate, SOHO, of ultra-geek home.

Boot a entire operating system off of a USB drive.
Boot a entire operating system off of a cdrom.
Boot a entire operating system off of a newtork from a completely diskless system. (floppies are cheating)
etc etc.

Mount /usr/local or something else on a network share to distribute applications to a veriaty of end users. I use that for Doom3 and other games, for instance. Run them directly from my server so that I don't have to install them on 2 machines. About as fast as local access when run over NFS on gigabit switched network.

Mirror my home directory using Unison. All of my user's files, all my application preferences, email, browser history, bookmarks, game scores, all my files, etc etc is semi-automaticly kept in sync between my laptop and desktop. Even desktop themes and backgrounds.

I can give copies of 'linux' distros to my mom. To my friends, my brothers and sister. I can use them at work, at home, or whatever. Sell them on Ebay. Give them away. Post links to bittorrent downloads on web forums. No activation things, no cd keys. Install them on people's computers. I don't have to worry about being sued, or being called a pirate or whatever. There is no 'software assurance' hoop I have to jump through. Don't have to deal with ending up with a blacklisted key or whatnot. I can change out my motherboard fairly easily, don't even have to prepare ahead of time or re-activate anything. etc etc.

I can run it on a PowerPC computer, or a POWER computer. Probably will be able to do it on a PS3. Also can run it on a Xbox. It's portable. I have it running on a dual-proccessor ARM handheld computer. If I was a multinational corporation and wanted to use it on potentionally millions of 'feature' phones, I could do so and obtain complete access to source code and applications without having to pay license fees. Crazy stuff like that.

Probably got ten, I guess.
 

Seeruk

Senior member
Nov 16, 2003
986
0
0
Holy Crap Drag you flew into that one didnt you :)

But... (you knew there had to be a 'but' from me didnt you? :) )

He didnt say anything about cost.

The point he was making is that there is stuff that you can do on Linux that you cant do with Windows.

Frankly I call FUD

Most of your list I can think of identical similar things I personally have been involved in setting up and configuring in Windows based environments, like wise in Linux Environments, and particularly on the Oracle and NAS points in mixed environments.

We have the same arguments everytime... so lets just paraphrase to

"Both OS's can do anything you set your mind to"
"One costs money for a license and one doesn't"
"Big deal, pick your poison but remember its software and not life definition"
 

doornail

Senior member
Oct 10, 1999
333
0
0
Originally posted by: Seeruk
The point he was making is that there is stuff that you can do on Linux that you cant do with Windows.

To be accurate, he was replying to someone else's claim that Linux/BSD has less than 1/10th of the functionality of Windows. You neglected to correct that pro-Windows FUD for some reason.

Nether OS is a drop-in replacement for the other but Linux is more flexible and can address a wider range of computing challenges. Not a selling point to the AoL crowd, I know. Windows is simpler to use -- especially since out-of-the box there's very little there.
 

hardcandy2

Senior member
Feb 13, 2006
333
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0
1. I can view a NTFS filesystem and even write to it if I so desire from a Linux installation. I cannot view or write to a linux partition.from a WinXP installation
2. I can have 10 people each with their own console and their own keyboard and mice on the same machine in Linux. I cannot do this in WinXP.
3. I can add a driver to a running kernel in Linux, and keep it going. I have to stop and reboot in Windows.
4. I can view Word documents from several word processors available in Linux. I cannot view open office docs from Word.
5. I can write code to supplement or improve a program in Linux. I am not legally allowed to alter the program code in Windows.
6. I can run a linux distro off a usb key or a floppy in Linux. How big is WinXP again?
7. I can update and add security patches in Linux and keep working. Again, I have to reboot WinXP.
8. I can choose to use more than one filesystem for a Linux installation (/boot is ext2, / is reiserfs, /home is ext3, etc). WinXP only allows either NTFS OR FAT32, not both.
9. I can run Linux with a GUI or without a GUI. WinXP does not give me that choice.
10. I can smile at the folks who rundown Linux because they do not know what they are talking about. With WinXP I have to agree with them because I am ignorant as well. :)