Question Windows 11 (the upgrade) Questions & Yes, Win10

PondScum

Junior Member
Dec 8, 2021
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I haven't been able to find this info anywhere, so I joined and now here I am, for what it's worth.

Windows 11: If I upgrade from Windows 10, will Windows 11 keep my old event logs from Win10, or are those wiped, starting over with new event logs for Windows 11? How about the same with my registry keys?

Secondly, I've got all of these MS Office docs, and audio files from over the years, and I like that it shows when they were created, and modified, etc. The Windows 11 "upgrade" shouldn't alter any of this data (metadata?) should it? I like my timestamps as historical records.

Lastly, I suppose it's roughly the same question for my apps. Will my app installation date remain the true installation date that I installed it on Win10?

Thank ya!
 

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
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If you upgrade from Win 10 to 11 the Entire Windows 10 is saved in a folder called Windows Old. There is where the Windows 10 Event Logs will be.

I do not know about the date stamps etc....

What I would do is make a good hard drive image of my Windows 10 drive. Then upgrade to Windows 11 and see if you like it and it does what you want. If it does fine. If it doesn't image back to the backup drive image you created.

Nothing lost and you will have your answers for certain other than relying on a random stranger on the internet for an answer that may or may not be correct.
 

PondScum

Junior Member
Dec 8, 2021
2
1
6
Nothing lost and you will have your answers for certain other than relying on a random stranger on the internet for an answer that may or may not be correct.
Ha! Right! Thank you for your answer. I didn't think that logs were stored in the Windows.old folder, but I could very well be mistaken, myself.

But yeah, you're right; making a backup would be good. My understanding is that the Windows.old folder only lasts for 10 days, so a good backup is always in order.

Past versions of Windows would have different log IDs for events, so I wonder if old logs are even compatible. I just can't remember how it was from Win8.1 to Win10, if I had the old logs are not.

I'm curious if anybody else has some comments, though, or a bit more insight. I'm certainly thankful for your reply.
 
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OlyAR15

Senior member
Oct 23, 2014
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Not sure why any of this matters,but event viewer only shows events after the upgrade. Files retain their metadata, including app install date (or at least, most of them do). I have no idea what you mean by registry keys. Some will change, others won't.
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
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Sep 13, 2008
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Is there a particular reason you want to upgrade to windows 11? IMO, for many users including myself, there isn't really a reason to right now, especially depending on certain hardware. If there is a reason you want/need to upgrade that is fine, just be aware that there are some issues with Windows 11, and it may not be worth it. I hope this helps in making your decision, and feel free to ask more questions.
 
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BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
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Is there a particular reason you want to upgrade to windows 11? IMO, for many users including myself, there isn't really a reason to right now, especially depending on certain hardware. If there is a reason you want/need to upgrade that is fine, just be aware that there are some issues with Windows 11, and it may not be worth it. I hope this helps in making your decision, and feel free to ask more questions.
Replying to your post, because you address the issue of the moment -- the same transitional misgivings we had about migrating to 10 from 7.

I have questions.

I understand that older systems before my Skylake and Kaby Lake machines will not upgrade to Windows 11. I've also learned something about the MS Office suites, particularly the 2010 and 2013 versions. First of all, you cannot make a fresh install of MS Office Home and Business 2013 to a Win 11 system. So I'm wondering whether upgrading a Win 10 to Win 11 will render Office similarly unusable.

I refuse to pay full price for the very latest MS Office suite. 2010 and 2013 are just fine. We're on a budget; we make practical decisions about software upgrades.

I just purchased a (last year's) Acer Nitro 5 AN515-55-53E5 Gaming Laptop for my brother -- it's "that season" and he's unhappy with his desktop PC. The Nitro 5 is fitted with an i5-10300H, an nVidia RTX-3050 and 8GB of RAM. A RAM upgrade may only cost about $40 and should be easy to perform. We all use Office Outlook as an e-mail browser/calendar/contact-manager. The Win 10 Home on the Nitro comes outfitted with their hooks to prod you into a subscription for Office 365 -- which must be uninstalled (64-bit) before installing a 32-bit version of Office. I always seem to forget about these 64-bit/32-bit distinctions, but the 32-bit version works just fine for me -- or for anyone else in the household. I got the Office Home And Business 2013 for about $80 from My Choice Software, a reseller that has proved reliable for at least five years.

So . . . . how long will they keep Windows 10 alive? I'm still running Win 7 on a couple machines here in the house. They don't get infected; nothing goes wrong; we just have to deal with the occasional light-blue screen that informs the user of discontinued support.
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
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Windows 10 will be supported till October 14th, 2025.

Afaik, you CAN upgrade older systems to Windows 11, using various workarounds. I just don't see the point for Windows 11 at the time being.
 
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BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
15,216
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Outside someone being an early 12th gen Intel builder, there's no other reason I could see updating from 10 to 11.
Answering Schmee as well . . .

I've been fiddling with "micro-computers" since 1983. I've probably used every version of MSDOS until the first version of Windows, moving to Windows with version 3.0. I've had Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT, Windows XP . . . 7 and then 10. I'm tired of this s***. I've still got two Windows 7 machines that function daily.

We got from MSDOS and Windows 3.x to an operating system that behaves like an advertisement agency. Pop-ups, "news and weather" updates that you don't want to see.

I am just now -- oh, I already said it! -- moving my brother from Win 7 to Win 10. I wouldn't know what "Mainstreamers" do or how much they spend on average annually to stay plugged in. But I use my computer for labor-saving functions that were once time-consuming. If I'd even had Quicken Home & Business in 1980, my retirement nest-egg today would've been much bigger.

So -- yeah -- the only reason to upgrade I can imagine might be a hardware changeover which won't support an existing version of Windows.

I liked MS better when Bill Gates was at the helm . . .
 

KentState

Diamond Member
Oct 19, 2001
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Outside someone being an early 12th gen Intel builder, there's no other reason I could see updating from 10 to 11.
I've upgraded all 6 of my Windows 10 machines to 11. At some point it would need to be done and wanted to get it out of the way. So far no noticeable difference after the upgrades besides some of the newer features. I did end up using a third part start menu program like I did when Windows 8 launched.
 

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