Question Windows 11, a board that supports it, and a CPU that doesn't

mikeymikec

Lifer
May 19, 2011
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I've built a few PCs with the ASUS PRIME B350M-A board (which ASUS claims it supports Win11) and a Ryzen 2200G CPU (which isn't on the CPU support list).

Will such a PC run Win11 (assuming the latest BIOS updates and BIOS configured correctly)?

My impression was that it had to be a CPU-based TPM (hence the CPU support list), however the other day I encountered another PC I built (3400G, B450M-A) which MS's "PC Health Check" claimed didn't support Win11 until I changed a BIOS setting from discrete TPM to firmware. I thought that setting was CPU = discrete and firmware = board, so I was quite surprised when it seemed to satisfy the PC health check.

As a result I'm wondering if the PCs I've built with the B350M-A board will support Win11 if the TPM setting is set to firmware.
 

TheELF

Diamond Member
Dec 22, 2012
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If you circumvent the installer either by copying the .esd/wim to an windows 10 installation media, editing the registry or installation file
or by using dism to just apply the install image to a clean partition,
windows 11 will run fine on unsupported hardware.
The only part that doesn't work is the installer.
 
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JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
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Assuming that you have whatever needed to first Install Win 10 on this new arrangement.

Install Win 10 and activate it.

Download Win 11 ISO from MS. https://www.microsoft.com/software-download/windows11 (choose the 3rd option)

Download Rufus 3.18 https://www.makeuseof.com/rufus-318-bypass-windows-11-tpm-restrictions-in-place-upgrades/

Make an USB WIN 11 install flash Drive (when doing it pull down the and choose the option to bypass install restriction).

Use the Flash Drive to do inplace Install of Win 11.
In 30 Min (give and take) you would have New Installed Computer with fully functional Win 11.

After the Install Run free version of ccleaner and use the general Clean and the Registry Cleaner.

Then, use Win 11 native Disk CleanUp (choose the Clean System files option).

The end result will be fully functional Win 11 and you even save fe GB of HD/SSD space,

In case of old MBR system there is a choice to use MBR in Rufus (pull down the parson scheme menu).

I tried it all the way down to 10 years old Intel Q9400 Core2Duo computer and it works very well.

Same for AMD Phenum x4 955 circa 2010.


:cool:
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
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Yeah there are a lot of cool workarounds to enable Windows 11 on systems where it is no supported, or even if you want to do a legacy boot. I used the method listed by TheELF to do an upgrade on my X99 system. It worked pretty well, installed with the upgrade no problem, though this was with the leaked beta ISO before launch. I since have restored back to Windows 10 from a backup, as I have no need for Windows 11 right now, until some substantial upgrade is released. (Such as better performance, new technology, etc.)
 

tcsenter

Lifer
Sep 7, 2001
17,907
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My impression was that it had to be a CPU-based TPM (hence the CPU support list), however the other day I encountered another PC I built (3400G, B450M-A) which MS's "PC Health Check" claimed didn't support Win11 until I changed a BIOS setting from discrete TPM to firmware. I thought that setting was CPU = discrete and firmware = board, so I was quite surprised when it seemed to satisfy the PC health check.
The Ryzen 5 3400G is supported processor model for Windows 11.

Discrete TPM that means a non-integrated TPM chip either soldered to the motherboard somewhere, or via plug-in module card (via pin header). If the board has neither, it will default back to firmware based TPM supported by the CPU/chipset.
 
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BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
15,312
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TPM!!! I was disgruntled as is, some years back, with the security feature for encryption set in the BIOS. In choosing NVME drives, I had a choice between Samsung -- which provides a security feature required by our national security apparatus -- and SK Hynix -- which doesn't. Maybe it's a personal calculation, but I don't want something in my system that could accidentally enable a feature depriving me of access to my own hardware. Of course, I wouldn't be deterred from buy Sammy drives, but the SK Hynix were highly touted, and the price was right.

I can understand MS and its decision -- partly. But they still might have enabled Win 11 for older systems and support those CPUs.
 
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