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Windows 10 Professional - Not professional at all

akugami

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2005
4,618
32
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That's it. We're done with Windows. The company I work for has already started moving to Android. We produce software and systems for other businesses, so it's nothing an end-user would see, and I'm not here to shill anything.

Our problems started with Windows started with Windows 10. Specifically, the Windows 10 Professional version not being able to disable automatic Windows Updates. There has been more than one occasion where forced updates has caused issues with hardware peripherals. Some catastrophically since some of these devices do not have drivers compatible with the latest version of W10, such as kiosk touchscreens not working due to a forced Windows Update. And many industry specific devices still don't. Not to mention complaints of unprofessional looking systems with games being automatically downloaded to Windows 10 Professional systems.

We're sort of in that "in between" stage where we're not big enough to have our own custom systems, but large enough where we've lost untold hours doing manual labor cleaning up Windows and configuring it for what our customers want. Windows 7 was never this problematic. We could go with embedded versions of Windows 10, but those dramatically increase our costs, because they usually require purchasing very vendor specific hardware.

We've lost untold support hours troubleshooting and fixing issues caused by forced Windows Updates. The latest fiasco caused our software to crash and have printing issues. Hopefully fixed with Update KB5001649. But it should NEVER have come to this. We purchase systems with W10 Pro for a reason dammit. Not to mention I've left some work open, only to come back the next day and greeted by a reboot due to Windows Updates. You win Microsoft. We give up. We're leaving your house.
 
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mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
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813
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Your IT dept is not doing its job. As @UsandThem pointed out, use Group Policy to stop automatic updates or use a different version (LTSC) of Windows.

==

So what Android devices your company are going to use?
 
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akugami

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2005
4,618
32
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My understanding is, with all methods, even using gpedit, it's only delaying the updates and not stopping the updates. We've had to do things such as replace older, but perfectly usable peripherals, with newer models, just because it does not work with the current version of W10 Pro. This is a delaying tactic, which we've used, but ultimately, not a solution. Short of blocking the IP addresses, which we don't want to do. Basically we are not against Windows Updates, just in a controlled manner and at our choosing.

Windows 10 does come in an Enterprise/Embedded version, but now we run the added headache of dealing with W10 installation if we purchase computer and Windows separately, or costing us more money per system deploy if we get systems already with W10 Enterprise. It's cheaper to purchase a system such as Dell's Optiplex line vs buying systems already with W10 Enterprise. So yes, this is a solution, but now we add from about $200+ per station deploy vs a standard "off the shelf" computer meant for business use.

@mxnerd, We're still in the exploratory phase, but using a ChromeOS and/or Android device may suffice in our product mix. You can largely use an unmodified Android app on ChromeOS these days, which is great. Linux was considered, but comes with its own challenges along with spotty peripheral support, and MacOS was a definite no-no due to an extreme lack of peripheral support.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
29,151
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On the other hand if your customers would not be pleased with limited flexibility of the "other solution", then you are back to square one, and might be losing customers.

:cool:
 

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
5,935
813
126
See if the following posts help.


 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,811
593
136
Unless Microsoft has changed it, one simple potential workaround is to set your network connection (either Ethernet or WiFi, whichever you use on your internal network) as being a metered connection. Then, under Windows Update advanced options, make sure the setting for "Download updates over metered connections (charges may apply)" is turned off.

This will permanently stop Windows from downloading any updates unless you manually tell it to do so. There is one exception for this, which is updates Microsoft deems too urgent to be delayed for an unmetered connection, but in my experience it is rarely used (mainly for Defender antimalware updates and things like Flash updates - which aren't an issue anymore since Flash is gone).

Do be aware that doing this can affect bluetooth connectivity (Windows won't download bluetooth drivers when set to metered); however, there is (or at least was) a workaround for it.
 
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