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Question Windows 10 and Xeon gold 6130

ksdst1

Junior Member
Jul 12, 2017
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Ordering a Dell Precision 7920 with Xeon Gold 6130 16C and I can't get good info whether I can run Windows 10 Education or Enterprise instead of their offered version, the newer Windows 10 Pro upto 4 core. Anyone know?
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
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Afaik, it seems like you may be mixing up the socket vs core limitations. Even W10 vanilla ('Home' or standard) can run 16 thread AMD and Intel CPUs. You need fancier variants for more sockets.

1 CPU W10
2 CPU W10 Pro/Enterprise
4 CPU W10 for Workstation

If you have a single 6130, you should have no problem.
 

ksdst1

Junior Member
Jul 12, 2017
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Tnx for the input Arkaign. Not mixed up with socket vs core. This processor is in a Dell Precision 7920 I'd like to order, where they list the chipset as the Intel C620 Series Chipset (C621), but haven't been able to get confirmation from Dell about Windows 10 Enterprise/Education and they only offer Windows 10 Pro pre-installed. I found an intel product brief for the processor that lists the W2016 and W2012 as supported (maybe not the most current brief). Today I found a Dell Precision 7920 owner's manual pdf that lists support for Win 10 Enterprise—64 bit.
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
20,724
1,354
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Ah, if you are running one or two CPUs (dual 6130s in this case), all versions of W10 you listed will work equally. The drivers listed on support . Dell . Com will be perfect in the event you wish to install yourself and ignore their preload.

If you want to fill 4 sockets, you will need the specific 'Windows 10 Pro for Workstation' designation.

Note : W10 Education *is* W10 Pro, just with some oddball stuff added in. Same 1 or 2 socket capability, up to 256 cores.
 

Topweasel

Diamond Member
Oct 19, 2000
5,398
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Just want to throw this out there . Windows 10 for Workstation is slightly different beast that supports a couple extra things like resilient file-system.

Microsoft for whatever reason charges more to OEM's for computers with 4 or less cores trying to use this version of Windows 10. Why I don't know.

I don't think there is an actual difference between the two Windows 10 for Workstation versions and seems to just be license difference and any customized machine from an OEM is just going to force you to change to Windows 10 for Workstation for up to 4 cores, if you select that an a 4 core I7 or Xeon. But if you upgrade to a 20 core CPU later, that install should support it and I don't believe you break the licensing (since 4 cores or lower is an increased priced feature).

The one thing I can figure is they want a little extra money from people who are trying to do a barebones File server with the reFS instead of using Server 2016.
 
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Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
20,724
1,354
126
Just want to throw this out there . Windows 10 for Workstation is slightly different beast that supports a couple extra things like resilient file-system.

Microsoft for whatever reason charges more to OEM's for computers with 4 or less cores trying to use this version of Windows 10. Why I don't know.

I don't think there is an actual difference between the two Windows 10 for Workstation versions and seems to just be license difference and any customized machine from an OEM is just going to force you to change to Windows 10 for Workstation for up to 4 cores, if you select that an a 4 core I7 or Xeon. But if you upgrade to a 20 core CPU later, that install should support it and I don't believe you break the licensing (since 4 cores or lower is an increased priced feature).

The one thing I can figure is they want a little extra money from people who are trying to do a barebones File server with the reFS instead of using Server 2016.
Yeah it's an odd situation for sure.

IMHO :

*IF* Dell is offering W10ProWS at no additional cost with the package. Take it and run, you're gold. If you should wish to upgrade to a 4 socket setup later, you are already ready to go.

*IF* Dell is wanting to charge extra for it, and you want to use W10 Pro, W10 Enterprise, or W10 Education, fine. Just use the drivers on their website, and you will be good with either 1 or 2 Xeon 6130s, and can upgrade to any other 1 or 2 CPU config in the future up to 256 total cores (so a hypothetical dual 128-core Xeon setup would work, should Intel release something in that socket, however unlikely or likely). If it happens that you later want to fill all 4 sockets, then at that time you will have to pony up for the W10WS license @ $309ish, or simply change operating systems to something else that does support 4 sockets.
 

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