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Question Win 11 check said my cpu does not qualify

Pghpooh

Senior member
Jan 9, 2000
791
1
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I used the win 11 verification to check my laptop and it said everything is ok but the cpu. Th cpu does not qualify. I followed up digging into the info posted on the win 11 site and my cpu is listed as ok.
Is this a glitch or???
 
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fralexandr

Platinum Member
Apr 26, 2007
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While it's not officially supported, windows 11 can be installed on it. Some sites may list it as compatible since that processor supports tpm 1.2 or newer. That means windows 11 can technically be installed using some workarounds to bypass parts of the windows 11 install.

I don't see much point to it, since by the time windows 10 becomes end of life, most of the unsupported hardware will be >8 years old. At that point, while the hardware may still be useable, it will be showing it's age.
 

Micrornd

Golden Member
Mar 2, 2013
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Interesting !
My wife's Gigabyte Brix GB-BKi7HT2-7500 (little square box 4.5"x4.75"x2"tall) uses a i7-7500U, supports Secure Boot, and gives the choice of supporting TPM 1.2 or 1.3 physically.
When either of the TPM choices is activated, it then shows TPM 2.0 as present.
On a bare metal install Windows 11 just breezed through install, without the slightest hesitation, and activated (she already had had W10 activated), no workarounds required.
So my guess would be that it depends highly on the bios and whether it accesses or makes available all the cpu's functions, especially since the i7-7700HQ is an arguably newer, slightly more advanced cpu that the i7-7500U .
 

Pghpooh

Senior member
Jan 9, 2000
791
1
81
Interesting !
My wife's Gigabyte Brix GB-BKi7HT2-7500 (little square box 4.5"x4.75"x2"tall) uses a i7-7500U, supports Secure Boot, and gives the choice of supporting TPM 1.2 or 1.3 physically.
When either of the TPM choices is activated, it then shows TPM 2.0 as present.
On a bare metal install Windows 11 just breezed through install, without the slightest hesitation, and activated (she already had had W10 activated), no workarounds required.
So my guess would be that it depends highly on the bios and whether it accesses or makes available all the cpu's functions, especially since the i7-7700HQ is an arguably newer, slightly more advanced cpu that the i7-7500U .
 

Pghpooh

Senior member
Jan 9, 2000
791
1
81
I followed the links provided by the win 11 test an ended up with this.
Went to the 21h1 and found my processor to be ok.
BUT,,, that list was made or updated in June.
The list provided here was updated this October. Thus,, my cpu is not on the new list. :(
As another person said my hardware will be 8 years old,, by that time I will be 84!!!! We'll both be slowing down a lot!!!!! LOL
Thanks for the help.
 

Linflas

Lifer
Jan 30, 2001
15,392
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91
I'm holding off on my 2 I7-7700 devices to see if they relent on not providing updates otherwise they will just stay at 10. That is really my only concern with using the registry key to allow installation.
 

Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
565
59
91
My does not qualify either so I wait patiently to buy a brand new desktop as soon as they release pre-build desktops into the marketplace. Hoping for November 4-5 time frame. May wait for Black Friday maybe but all sources say buy and not wait since chip shortage and limit supply, etc...
 

Johnny Ringo

Member
Dec 6, 2012
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I'm holding off on my 2 I7-7700 devices to see if they relent on not providing updates otherwise they will just stay at 10. That is really my only concern with using the registry key to allow installation.
I have a spare machine that I could use as a test workstation. If it did not work, nothing truly lost--just reinstall Windows 10 and 4 more years of updates.

It is an old i5 3570 that is in a Dell Optiplex 3010 SFF. The computer meets zero of the Windows 11 requirements, and I was able to install Windows 11 via a Rufus bootable USB with a generic Windows 11 iso file on the Rufus USB stick.

Despite not meeting any of the requirements it continues to get Windows Updates daily. Including the most recent monthly Windows 11 update. This appears to be working extremely well for now.

Waiting a year or two to see if it continues to get updates, and if it does, then I will update the rest of my PC's that are all on Windows 10 without issue.

None of my PC's meet the Windows 11 ridiculous requirements but all are extremely snappy for general web surfing/office work on Windows 10 or 11. Even a 10 year old PC with at least 8 GB of RAM, a quad core i5 or better, and a SSD, things are extremely snappy.

All things considered Windows 11 is very snappy, even on a 9-10 year old PC.
 
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VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
52,623
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I just ran into this today. I had purchased an EVOO laptop from ebay or Walmart, for my Mom. It has 4GB of RAM, 64GB of eMMC, meets the requirements for TPM2.0 and Secure Boot. Only, apparently, the CPU, an Intel Celeron N3350 (Atom) was "unsupported".

So, in Win10, after the Win11 installer USB refused to install, I did the registry edit to allow unsupported CPUs and TPM, and the re-ran the installer. It eventually got to a screen, saying that I had to accept a disclaimer that basically MS wasn't reponsible for bug, crashes, or eventual self-destruction of the PC, should I choose to continue installation with an "unsupported" CPU. Big whoop. :p

So, it's installing, I'll probably know in an hour whether it "worked". Making sure that it gets updates, is another question entirely. If it doesn't, then I'll either have to remote in and manually install from MS catalog update site, or figure something out.
 
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