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Will windows 10 work on old dual core CPU

TheDudeAhmed

Junior Member
Mar 24, 2020
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My laptop's CPU is Legacy Intel Pentium Dual-Core T4400
however, at Intel's site the table shows that this series of processors does not support Windows 10
now may I know what's the cause that I processor won't support windows 10??
I've read many other sites claiming its completely normal to run windows 10 on any dual core processor that has 2.0+ GHz clock and decent amount of RAM (>3GB)

lastly, if I install windows 10, will it work?
CPU T4400
integrated graphics
4GB ram ddr2
 

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
16,130
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My laptop's CPU is Legacy Intel Pentium Dual-Core T4400
however, at Intel's site the table shows that this series of processors does not support Windows 10
now may I know what's the cause that I processor won't support windows 10??
I've read many other sites claiming its completely normal to run windows 10 on any dual core processor that has 2.0+ GHz clock and decent amount of RAM (>3GB)

lastly, if I install windows 10, will it work?
CPU T4400
integrated graphics
4GB ram ddr2
Try it and post back the results.
It should work, although somewhat slowly.
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
3,758
446
126
Your problem will not be your CPU itself, but the integrated graphics. All of the integrated IGPs possible for C2D* systems are effectively obsolete. That's not to say they will not work, but the end result will not be good.

Windows 10 really require a DirectX 11-capable GPU to run well. I'd recommend not installing Win10 on anything pre-Ivy Bridge. That's the Core 3000-series, along with certain Pentium/Celeron models.

*Which your Pentium shares silicon with.
 

Johnny Ringo

Member
Dec 6, 2012
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i have installed windows 10 on lots of c2d machines, no problems at all. from using them, cant tell a difference in speed between 10 and 7
I have Windows 10 installed on two AMD Phenom 720's with integrated motherboard graphics that are 10 plus year old platforms. The integrated graphics works fine for regular office types of applications, and for web browsing.

I have two Intel platforms with integrated graphics that are also older on Windows 10. An i5 3470, and a i3 4150. The i3 4150 has much better graphics performance than the i5. It is noticeable on watching high definition videos on YouTube.

All in all, Windows 10 has been great on these very old systems with an SSD, and at least 8 GB of RAM.

I would say it is worth trying on the older core 2 system.
 

balloonshark

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2008
4,143
604
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FWIW I updated an old dual core laptop and was able to find cheap RAM which I upgraded before moving to 10. I think they cost $12-$13 per 4GB sticks. I installed 8GB which was way better than the 3GB included from the factory. I also already had an SSD installed which I'm sure helps.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
46,947
4,590
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I have Windows 10 installed on two AMD Phenom 720's with integrated motherboard graphics that are 10 plus year old platforms. The integrated graphics works fine for regular office types of applications, and for web browsing.

I have two Intel platforms with integrated graphics that are also older on Windows 10. An i5 3470, and a i3 4150. The i3 4150 has much better graphics performance than the i5. It is noticeable on watching high definition videos on YouTube.

All in all, Windows 10 has been great on these very old systems with an SSD, and at least 8 GB of RAM.

I would say it is worth trying on the older core 2 system.
The thing is, those aren't actually that old a system. Ivy Bridge and Haswell are still (kind of) recent, in that they are minimally still supported (I think?) with Win10 Intel iGPU drivers.

The Phenom II 720's mobo iGPUs are HD4200 or somesuch, on a 780G mobo, and those are also at the very least minimally-supported.

Anything Intel iGPU Sandy Bridge or older, is not really that supported in Win10, and a Core2-era iGPU may require using the "MS Basic Display Adapter", which is VERY basic, and AFAIK, does not support any sort of GPU-level acceleration for video files, and CPUs of that era don't have much grunt for more than 360P videos, if that, when streamed over the internet. (If their 'B' or 'G' wifi can even handle that.)

Edit: That said, it will probably function (compute, disk, and video, will boot), but the results may not be satisfactory.
 
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Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
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The thing is, those aren't actually that old a system. Ivy Bridge and Haswell are still (kind of) recent, in that they are minimally still supported (I think?) with Win10 Intel iGPU drivers.
Everything considered they're quite well supported. Latest drivers are from January, the whole Intel GPU security debacle forced them to update drivers from the 3rd gen and up.

I'm not sure if the updated drivers have a performance impact though. If that's even relevant. The difference in 3D performance between ultra slow and slideshow isn't going to make much difference.

Anything Intel iGPU Sandy Bridge or older, is not really that supported in Win10, and a Core2-era iGPU may require using the "MS Basic Display Adapter", which is VERY basic, and AFAIK, does not support any sort of GPU-level acceleration for video files, and CPUs of that era don't have much grunt for more than 360P videos, if that, when streamed over the internet. (If their 'B' or 'G' wifi can even handle that.)
This^^

C2D-era IGPs will put a picture on the monitor, and that's about it. For office type applications I doubt no one would notice, but browsing the web will be a bad experience if everything has to be handled in software.

...and the regular Windows maintenance just murder older 2.5" 5400RPM HDDs. Which this laptop very likely has. Been there, and been sorely tempted to throw said laptop out the Window(s). (Pun intended)
 

TheDudeAhmed

Junior Member
Mar 24, 2020
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okay this turned out to be a nice discussion, appreciate your replies
but, in the end:
for regular use like MS office, old Autocad like Autocad 2013 (should work fine based on system requirements on AutoDesk website, surfing web (videos running fine as I tried) will it suffice with Windows 10 64-bit? work smoothly?

if not, would you suggest upgrading to windows 8 or 8.1 64-bit or windows 10 32-bit?

I could've gone 8GB but maximum RAM supported for this chipset is 4GB (yeah very old stuff), only thing to do is install an SSD but it have SATA II I guess not SATA III (as PC wizard 2015 says) will that be a problem?
 

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
4,957
513
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Just buy a new laptop with Windows 10. Don't waste your time trying to revive the old laptop. Intel is not even providing graphics driver for Windows 8.x

 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
3,758
446
126
for regular use like MS office, old Autocad like Autocad 2013 (should work fine based on system requirements on AutoDesk website, surfing web (videos running fine as I tried) will it suffice with Windows 10 64-bit? work smoothly?
You'll have to try it. If you find it acceptable, fine. I doubt it will be smooth though.

However, I don't think it's worth the time (or money) you put in. You'd be much better of with even the cheapest laptop which features Windows 10. Just make sure you either get one which uses either an SSD or eMMC in a pinch. HDDs are dead for boot drives.

For basic usage, even my own Celeron N3350 craptop is perfectly useable.

if not, would you suggest upgrading to windows 8 or 8.1 64-bit or windows 10 32-bit?
If you absolutely cannot get a new laptop, I'd advise some lightweight flavour of Linux, if you have to use the internet. Linux has much better support for older hardware, if it's not too exotic.

Running a 32bit version of Windows 10 should only be done in very specific circumstances. Where you know exactly what you're getting into.

If you can use the internet from another PC, staying with 7 is perfectly acceptable.
 

RLGL

Golden Member
Jan 8, 2013
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Autocad 2013 is 32 or 64 bit. Makes a difference when installing windows version.
 

TheDudeAhmed

Junior Member
Mar 24, 2020
6
0
6
You'll have to try it. If you find it acceptable, fine. I doubt it will be smooth though.

However, I don't think it's worth the time (or money) you put in. You'd be much better of with even the cheapest laptop which features Windows 10. Just make sure you either get one which uses either an SSD or eMMC in a pinch. HDDs are dead for boot drives.

For basic usage, even my own Celeron N3350 craptop is perfectly useable.



If you absolutely cannot get a new laptop, I'd advise some lightweight flavour of Linux, if you have to use the internet. Linux has much better support for older hardware, if it's not too exotic.

Running a 32bit version of Windows 10 should only be done in very specific circumstances. Where you know exactly what you're getting into.

If you can use the internet from another PC, staying with 7 is perfectly acceptable.
I acknowledge what you're saying, if I had the money to buy a new laptop I certainly would, I know there are cheap laptops but most of them if not all are of Intel U CPUs or other power-saving performance murdering stuff, which is what I don't want to waste money on because in maximum 2 years it'll be much like garbage (sorry for that word)

if I want to buy a new laptop I make sure to buy at least an Intel 8th gen i5 or i7 H,HQ,MQ or these performance favouring stuff with dedicated good GPU of course, it's just not worth wasting money on power-saving CPUs and low end or integrated graphics

finally, if windows 10 was a no no, then I'd just stay with this "extinct" laptop =)) until God facilitate livelihood
 

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
4,957
513
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Walmart Laptop. It's $279 now though.

Forget about getting dedicated GPU if you can't even afford a cheap new laptop


 
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TheDudeAhmed

Junior Member
Mar 24, 2020
6
0
6
Walmart Laptop. It's $279 now though.

Forget about getting dedicated GPU if you can't even afford a cheap new laptop



what is this garbage? 4gb ram? who the hell is MOTILE anyway?
anyways, I didn't say I can't afford a cheap new laptop, in fact, thanks God, I can
BUT it's a waste of money, why would you get something with capabilities only slightly better than a damn 10+ years old laptop, just forget about that laptop

anyway, right now, I can spare 600$ for a laptop but should not have a power consumption saving stuff like Intel U or Y or T or that sort of stuff or without dedicated GPU

I say 8th gen Intel i5-8400B and 1050Ti would be decent or anything above (if that fits :sweatsmile:)
 

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
4,957
513
126
You can easily buy a 16GB RAM to replace that 4GB module any time.

If you can spare $600, why trying to revive that T4400 CPU with DDR2 laptop in the first place? 🙄 You were giving people the impression that you don't even have the money to buy a cheap new laptop.

$600 makes your choice much easier.

 
Last edited:

TheDudeAhmed

Junior Member
Mar 24, 2020
6
0
6
You can easily buy a 16GB RAM to replace that 4GB module any time.

If you can spare $600, why trying to revive that T4400 CPU with DDR2 laptop in the first place? 🙄 You were giving people the impression that you don't even have the money to buy a cheap new laptop.

$600 makes your choice much easier.

What’s this company reputation? Previous user experiences, support, reliability etc all this have to be checked before buying

I didn’t intend to give that impression, I was just seeking out maximum possibilities (if there’s any) so that if the thing fits maybe it can give me a time boost to spare more $$ for a new laptop, sure, its basic information that you can’t get what you desire in 10+ years old machine

Anyway thanks for the link, gonna review it and see
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
3,758
446
126
I acknowledge what you're saying, if I had the money to buy a new laptop I certainly would, I know there are cheap laptops but most of them if not all are of Intel U CPUs or other power-saving performance murdering stuff, which is what I don't want to waste money on because in maximum 2 years it'll be much like garbage (sorry for that word)
I think you'll find those performance murdering power saving new chips are significantly faster then any C2D/Q. That's what 11 years worth of improvements from Penryn do. Don't mistake a 15W TDP with "slow". Especially when coupled with an NVMe SSD.

Even the lowest-end Gemini Lake parts are already on par with C2D and C2Qs for the 4 core versions. In a 10W envelope.

Also, don't mistake modern IGPs with Intel's old GMA ones. The HD500/(U)HD600 series are quite capable for desktop work, since they have hardware acceleration for everything. Even simple JPEG decoding is done in hardware.
 
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TheDudeAhmed

Junior Member
Mar 24, 2020
6
0
6
I think you'll find those performance murdering power saving new chips are significantly faster then any C2D/Q. That's what 11 years worth of improvements from Penryn do. Don't mistake a 15W TDP with "slow". Especially when coupled with an NVMe SSD.

Even the lowest-end Gemini Lake parts are already on par with C2D and C2Qs for the 4 core versions. In a 10W envelope.

Also, don't mistake modern IGPs with Intel's old GMA ones. The HD500/(U)HD600 series are quite capable for desktop work, since they have hardware acceleration for everything. Even simple JPEG decoding is done in hardware.
yeah sure I know what you're saying, of course Core 2 series is like an 'extinct' series, tbh even old i3s and i5s from Intel first generation are considered useless now, anything dual core will not suffice any more, quad core is the minimum standard right now and in the next few years they'll probably be less and less efficient

so if I'm investing in some hardware, I advise myself to get a 6-core CPU

new integrated GPUs may be good but and will never be as good as a mid
 

Charlie98

Diamond Member
Nov 6, 2011
6,204
38
91
First replace the HD with SSD.
Be aware that HDD might be PATA, not SATA. My Dell laptop from around 2006 was PATA. A quick check with CrystalDisk will tell you what you have.


Question: I'm currently installing W10 on my old i5 2500K (Sandy Bridge, for those of you who have forgotten about the trusty old 2500K... ;) ) and it seems to be working well enough. It will eventually go into my HTPC, replacing an i3 2100... but it will have a GTX950 as well, does this negate the video issues with older chips? I've not tried to stream anything on it just yet, but I wasn't aware until I saw this thread that there was any issues...
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
3,758
446
126
yeah sure I know what you're saying, of course Core 2 series is like an 'extinct' series, tbh even old i3s and i5s from Intel first generation are considered useless now, anything dual core will not suffice any more, quad core is the minimum standard right now and in the next few years they'll probably be less and less efficient
I think you're missing the point. Any Nehalem and later CPU is perfectly adequate for office work. It's the old IGPs that that are useless.

If you pair a C2D with something like a GT710 (or perhaps even GT1030), that still has driver support, you have a perfectly acceptable system.

Trouble is you can't upgrade an IGP in a laptop, so the IGP renders the whole laptop unusable.

new integrated GPUs may be good but and will never be as good as a mid
An integrated Vega11 is already a good deal faster then most older midrange cards. The Ryzen 4000 series should be even better. If you mean within the same generation of hardware, certainly.

However, none of that matters for desktop work. Even AutoCAD will run happily on a modern IGP, barring driver issues.

Question: I'm currently installing W10 on my old i5 2500K (Sandy Bridge, for those of you who have forgotten about the trusty old 2500K... ;) ) and it seems to be working well enough. It will eventually go into my HTPC, replacing an i3 2100... but it will have a GTX950 as well, does this negate the video issues with older chips?
Completely. See first paragraph above.

A 2500K + GTX950 makes for a fine HTPC IMHO.
 
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DAPUNISHER

Super Moderator and Elite Member
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Aug 22, 2001
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The thing is, those aren't actually that old a system. Ivy Bridge and Haswell are still (kind of) recent, in that they are minimally still supported (I think?) with Win10 Intel iGPU drivers.

The Phenom II 720's mobo iGPUs are HD4200 or somesuch, on a 780G mobo, and those are also at the very least minimally-supported.

Anything Intel iGPU Sandy Bridge or older, is not really that supported in Win10, and a Core2-era iGPU may require using the "MS Basic Display Adapter", which is VERY basic, and AFAIK, does not support any sort of GPU-level acceleration for video files, and CPUs of that era don't have much grunt for more than 360P videos, if that, when streamed over the internet. (If their 'B' or 'G' wifi can even handle that.)

Edit: That said, it will probably function (compute, disk, and video, will boot), but the results may not be satisfactory.
Win 10 support is not necessary my friend. At least not with an 11yr old GeForce 7025/nForce 630a chipset using the IGP. Of course it is not going to decode VP9, AV1, or such, but the Phenom II 960T @ 4GHz that I just tried with it, can handle Youtube 1080p60 itself. Barely, but it can do it, drops about 15-20 percent of the frames but the video is still very watchable. 720p or 768p? is a better option for playback on an old laptop. I think the dual core could handle decoding that res well enough.

Back to my point: I picked legacy win7 64bit drivers for the Asus M2N68-AM SE2 and win 10 pro 1909 installed them like they were native. Every legacy game and software I have tried on this old PC works automatically in 1909 so far. I do not even have to compatibility troubleshoot anything. I am posting from the IGP setup via VGA 1080@60 and it is a bit blurry on a 1440p monitor. And for the lulz I fired up GTA: San Andreas and it played it@720p 20fps average. Had to turn the ceiling fan on high, my ir temp gun read 67c for the heatsink on the MCP68SE after only a couple of minutes of game play. That brought temps down to 54c max so far. I added VRM cooling by taking the VRM heatsink from a dead MSI z87 G45 Gaming, so they are handling the OC and gaming no problem.

Based on my experience, someone should be able to pick old win 7 64bit drivers and 1909 will make them work.
 

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