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Will the overclocking be constrained by the motherboard and chipset?

hshen1

Member
May 5, 2013
70
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0
Hi,

Now I am going to buy a desktop with an unlocked processor(e.g.,i7-3770K).I am just wondering whether I need to pay special attention to the motherboard or chipset? For example, is it possible that that motherboard or chipset doesn't support the high voltage required by the overclocking?:wub:
 

Wall Street

Senior member
Mar 28, 2012
691
44
91
Yes, because overclocking runs the voltage regulator modules (VRMs) way out of spec, many people have investigated and formed different opinions on the number of VRM phases (4, 8, 12 or even sometimes more), analog vs. digital VRMs, VRM cooling. BIOS options including load line calibration (LLC), offset voltage and vcore adjustments also matter. Google any of those terms and you will find a ton more information than can be summarized in a single post.
 

PhIlLy ChEeSe

Senior member
Apr 1, 2013
962
0
0
Hi,

Now I am going to buy a desktop with an unlocked processor(e.g.,i7-3770K).I am just wondering whether I need to pay special attention to the motherboard or chipset? For example, is it possible that that motherboard or chipset doesn't support the high voltage required by the overclocking?:wub:

Since you don't post up what your buying we have no way of knowing anything, the only motherboard's which are not restraining on the CPU(usually)are top end Asus/Gigabyte motherboards. Long before that heat and voltage will come into play, usually a prebuilt will not have a good quality PSU or good enough to do what you want. Factory in the CPU cooling as well..........
 

hshen1

Member
May 5, 2013
70
0
0
Yes, because overclocking runs the voltage regulator modules (VRMs) way out of spec, many people have investigated and formed different opinions on the number of VRM phases (4, 8, 12 or even sometimes more), analog vs. digital VRMs, VRM cooling. BIOS options including load line calibration (LLC), offset voltage and vcore adjustments also matter. Google any of those terms and you will find a ton more information than can be summarized in a single post.
Ok. I will look into that.Thanks
 

hshen1

Member
May 5, 2013
70
0
0
Since you don't post up what your buying we have no way of knowing anything, the only motherboard's which are not restraining on the CPU(usually)are top end Asus/Gigabyte motherboards. Long before that heat and voltage will come into play, usually a prebuilt will not have a good quality PSU or good enough to do what you want. Factory in the CPU cooling as well..........
So if I am going to buy an Intel i7 3770K desktop on Ebay. I am just wondering whether the accompanied motherboard will work well or not(for example, this one MSI B75-MA-E33). My typically concern is whether the motherboard can supply high enough voltage for the overclocking.
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,494
220
106
So if I am going to buy an Intel i7 3770K desktop on Ebay. I am just wondering whether the accompanied motherboard will work well or not(for example, this one MSI B75-MA-E33). My typically concern is whether the motherboard can supply high enough voltage for the overclocking.
That motherboard with a K series will allow you to overclock, and will allow you to raise the CPU voltage if needed.
 

hshen1

Member
May 5, 2013
70
0
0
That motherboard with a K series will allow you to overclock, and will allow you to raise the CPU voltage if needed.
Thanks for your info.But I just have another question. Please take a look at my another post here:
http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2318925
I am just concerned whether there is a way to request a higher voltage in programming way? Or I need to do it in a "hard" way, such as I need to push some button on the motherboard. Because what I want is to overclock the processor in Linux on the fly by programming^_^
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,494
220
106
Thanks for your info.But I just have another question. Please take a look at my another post here:
http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2318925
I am just concerned whether there is a way to request a higher voltage in programming way? Or I need to do it in a "hard" way, such as I need to push some button on the motherboard. Because what I want is to overclock the processor in Linux on the fly by programming^_^
A higher voltage will fry the chip. You won't have that option because the manufacturer assumed that is not what you want to do.

And unless you were on LN2, more voltage would make the chip throttle like crazy (before its death) anyway.
 

hshen1

Member
May 5, 2013
70
0
0
A higher voltage will fry the chip. You won't have that option because the manufacturer assumed that is not what you want to do.

And unless you were on LN2, more voltage would make the chip throttle like crazy (before its death) anyway.
I see. Thanks:p
 

hshen1

Member
May 5, 2013
70
0
0
That motherboard with a K series will allow you to overclock, and will allow you to raise the CPU voltage if needed.
Hi,I am planning to order this machine:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Gaming-Desktop-PC-MM2-67-524-Intel-i7-3770K-3-5GHz-8GB-DDR3-1TB/400469904560?_trksid=p2045573.m2042&_trkparms=aid=111000&algo=REC.CURRENT&ao=1&asc=27&meid=7584359243482249241&pid=100033&prg=1011&rk=1&sd=400469904560&

It is configurable on the website. The base motherboard is MSI B75-MA-E33 and you can change it. Can you take a look and give me some suggestion on the motherboard selection?;)
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,494
220
106
Hi,I am planning to order this machine:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Gaming-Desktop-PC-MM2-67-524-Intel-i7-3770K-3-5GHz-8GB-DDR3-1TB/400469904560?_trksid=p2045573.m2042&_trkparms=aid=111000&algo=REC.CURRENT&ao=1&asc=27&meid=7584359243482249241&pid=100033&prg=1011&rk=1&sd=400469904560&

It is configurable on the website. The base motherboard is MSI B75-MA-E33 and you can change it. Can you take a look and give me some suggestion on the motherboard selection?;)
Sure. I have had very good luck with Gigabyte boards. They hold up well, have a good price, and come with everything you need. It looks like they offer this board:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813128550

which would do you well IMO. My advice would be to look up the motherboard models on a site like Newegg. That will give you some good direction on all the features of the boards they offer (rather than just a model name and a couple features listed) plus info on what other buyers think of them.

Have you considered building you on? Lots of sites out there have a guide on doing this, and the forums are always available.
 

hshen1

Member
May 5, 2013
70
0
0
Sure. I have had very good luck with Gigabyte boards. They hold up well, have a good price, and come with everything you need. It looks like they offer this board:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813128550

which would do you well IMO. My advice would be to look up the motherboard models on a site like Newegg. That will give you some good direction on all the features of the boards they offer (rather than just a model name and a couple features listed) plus info on what other buyers think of them.

Have you considered building you on? Lots of sites out there have a guide on doing this, and the forums are always available.
Great!Thanks.I will buy this motherboard(may need to do some overclocking stuff):rolleyes:
 

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